donald glover this is america meaning

I believe that this refers to the widespread belief in African American communities that young men must do whatever it takes to become. Dropping amid ongoing political and cultural tumult and turmoil, Childish Gambino's “This is America” appears to be a commentary on black. “The fact that Childish Gambino's 'This is America' tackles police brutality, gun violence, media misdirection, and the use of African Americans. donald glover this is america meaning

Donald glover this is america meaning -

Childish Gambino – This Is America Lyrics Meaning

The George Floyd incident in May of 2020 has reignited the long ongoing war between race and the remembrance of the song “This Is America” by Childish Gambino. Hello everyone, this is Laviasco. You can find me on Twitter @laviasco as well. Today we are going to look at the deeper side of the song which has been taken for granted for so long. Black Lives Matter and it is not a drill. Let’s learn the meaning behind the lyrics of the song “This Is America” by Childish Gambino where we can see passive-aggressive psychology playing into the future.

The song “This Is America” by Childish Gambino is by far the most accurate representation of human psychology in the USA. In the totality of the song, the lyrics, and the music video go sideways in a passive-aggressive way to represent people’s inability to express their anger openly.

Introduction: This Is America Lyrics

The lyrics of “This Is America” is mostly passive-aggressive. As police brutality becomes more relatable than ever with endless political and cultural chaos and riot, the song seems to be an analysis of black existence in America and American civilization as an entirety. It differentiates the prominent community’s awareness of black ordeal and its continual inhumane actuality by juxtaposing delighted, indifferent choruses and dark, passive-aggressive verses.

Psychology Behind Passive-Aggressive Behavior In “This Is America” Explained

While being passive-aggressive isn’t necessarily a psychological disorder, it can represent the pain and discomfort people are trying to hide to protect themselves. The passive-aggressive attitude expressed in “This Is America” can be interpreted as a coping mechanism to show anger towards the things that people are scared of the most. In this particular scenario, people are scared to stand up for Black Lives Matter as they fear America paying policemen to hurt their own citizens for having a voice.

This is America Lyrics Meaning

Let’s dissect the meaning behind the lyrics of the song “This Is America” by Childish Gambino section-wise in detail.

[Intro: Choir]

The guitarist and gospel choir presented at the beginning of “This Is America” spot it within a protracted myth of black theme and painting. It has been an issue in American history. This song behaves as both an answer and an ointment for discomfort. An ensemble can furthermore exemplify a faction appearing jointly as well as completing as a sole body. The singer underlines that the black community will breathe and perish together in their battle against mistreatment.

In the official music video for “This Is America,” the guitarist is depicted with a pouch over his head only before going for the Chorus, and then Childish Gambino takes a different turn. There are multiple layers of violence in the music video. Over these actions, the singer exemplifies America’s brutal narrative of muzzling African-Americans and their melodious and artistic tributes to the nation.

[Bridge: Childish Gambino & Young Thug]

The lyrics of “This Is America,” and the music video as an entirety, analyze the friendship between having fun and turmoil that join to consist of a lot of both festivity and black existence in the USA. Gambino characterizes how a few individuals are ready to persuade other people only to climb the ladder of life moving forward. They do this by coming to be impassive with the biological and cognitive mourning around themselves.

[Chorus: Childish Gambino]

Childish Gambino is attempting to accentuate the turmoil in the USA with the “This Is America” song. He is trying to represent multiple instances of barbarity from authoritative people in America where sufferers are not treated well after having perpetrated small or no offense. The music video for the song shows the weapon used being carefully held up, which is exemplifying the impression that firearms are dealt with better care than human beings.

[Verse 1: Childish Gambino, Young ThugBlocboy JB & 21 Savage]

Likewise in the lyrics for the first verse of “This Is America,” a widespread conception is mentioned. It is that the officers carefully behave badly towards people with color. Some officers might get at it as a tough thing to digest that a person of color is attaining elevated degrees of prosperity and prestige when they clench biases towards the race considered as superior to the others. The phrases “cold” and “dope” might characterize apathy and an absence of sentiment in a violent environment as a preferable characteristic.

[Refrain/ Outro: Choir & Childish Gambino]

In “This Is America” Childish Gambino appears to be indicating that, simply as the dancing takes people away from the turmoil around us. The rivalry of wealth, and straight to a few extents of achievement and recreation on their own, divert people from the hardship and planned unevenness that persists. At a similar moment, he understands that withstanding planned imbalance is a portion of what gives rise to the wealth (and the entertainment) so attractive.

[Verse 2: Childish Gambino, Quavo, Young Thug, 21 Savage & BlocBoy JB]

Childish Gambino mimes individuals who are effortlessly diverted from public problems by temporal commodities and social prestige in “This Is America.” He fits these verses with his creation of the music video perfectly. Several of the responses to the music video indicated the dance steps to confuse them from what was actually active in the background of the song. This is the fact the singer wishes to spread from his art. Individuals are better anxious with the upcoming episode of a TV show than public problems.

[Outro: Young Thug]

Conclusion: This Is America Meaning

The difference in skin color might as well attribute to the cyclical changes in personality whenever there is violence in America. At one instant, the whole country is in a rebellion, at the next, they are comfortable and untroubled, controlled by pop-culture sensations. People look scared when the violence happens and they forget about it a few moments later. What do you think is the meaning behind the lyrics of the song “This Is America” by Childish Gambino? Let us know in the comments section below or on Twitter @laviasco.

“This Is America” Official Music Video

In the official music video for “This Is America,” Childish Gambino depicts this injustice by dancing happily with small kids, clearly unbothered by the violent events of turmoil in the scene. Nevertheless, in the ending set, the singer is discerned fleeing desperately via an overshadowed repository striving to avoid the crowd that presently hunts him. It is an indication that if America prefers to stay willfully innocent of its crises, it will certainly be the nation’s failure.

Read the meaning behind the lyrics of the song “This Is America” on Genius in detail.

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This Is America (song)

2018 single by Childish Gambino

This article is about the 2018 Childish Gambino song. For other uses, see This Is America (disambiguation).

2018 single by Childish Gambino

"This Is America" is a song by American rapper Donald Glover, under his musical stage name Childish Gambino. Written by Glover, Ludwig Göransson, and Jeffery Lamar Williams,[5] and produced by Glover and Göransson, it was released on May 5, 2018, at the same time that Gambino was hosting an episode of Saturday Night Live. The song features background vocals by American rappers Young Thug (who also has writing credit as Williams), Slim Jxmmi of Rae Sremmurd, BlocBoy JB, Quavo of Migos, and 21 Savage.[6][7] The song addresses the wider issue of gun violence in the United States, the high rate of mass shootings in the United States, along with other social issues that are presumed to be aftereffects of historically prevalent systemic racism and discrimination.

The song's accompanying music video was directed by filmmaker Hiro Murai, a frequent Gambino collaborator.[8][9] "This Is America" became the 31st song to debut at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100, becoming both Gambino's first number one and top ten single in the country. It has also topped the charts in Australia, Canada, and New Zealand. The song won in all four of its nominated categories at the 61st Annual Grammy Awards: Record of the Year, Song of the Year, Best Rap/Sung Performance and Best Music Video. This made Gambino the first hip-hop artist to win Record of the Year and Song of the Year, and "This Is America" the first rap song to win these awards.[10]

Composition[edit]

The song features a gospel-style choir and background contributions from various American rappers. Young Thug, Slim Jxmmi, BlocBoy JB, 21 Savage and Quavo each deliver an ad-lib.[9][11] Young Thug returns to supply the song's outro.[7] The lyrics primarily address black culture in the United States and gun violence in the country.[12] It also touches on the subject of police brutality and misconduct.[13][14]Pitchfork's Stephen Kearse described the song as a representation of the "tightrope of being black", with the song "built on the sharp contrast between jolly, syncretic melodies and menacing trap cadences".[15] Bryan Rolli of Forbes calls it "a vicious, urgent take on modern trap music, as Glover adopts the clipped, percussive flow of his contemporaries atop crackling 808s and rumbling bass."[3]

Media outlets reported that a number of listeners accused Gambino of plagiarism over "This Is America", pointing out the similarities between the song and "American Pharaoh" by Jase Harley.[16][17]CBS News stated, "The tracks have a similar sound, and share similar themes in the lyrics." Harley stated that he felt "This Is America" was influenced by his song, but that he does not have an issue with it. Glover's manager, Fam Rothstein, denied any plagiarism.[18]

Music video[edit]

In the music video, Gambino assumes a stance similar to the Jim Crowcaricature

The music video was directed by Hiro Murai and released on YouTube simultaneously with Gambino's performance of the song on Saturday Night Live. The video received about 12.9 million views in 24 hours,[19] and has over 800 million views as of November 2021.[20] In an interview with the New York Times, Murai discussed his upcoming season for Atlanta, a show created by and starring Glover. He stated, "There's sort of a world-weariness in both this season and the music video. They're both reactions to what's happening in the world."[21]

The video contains many scenes involving violence. It starts off with a shirtless Gambino dancing through a warehouse, interacting with a series of chaotic scenes. According to Murai, the video was inspired by the films Mother! and City of God. Prettyman states "The video tests us, taunting us to keep pace as we try to decode every gesture and calculation".[22] Choreographed by Sherrie Silver, Gambino and his entourage of young dancers perform several viral dance moves including the South AfricanGwara gwara and "Shoot" popularized by BlocBoy JB, who is one of the ad-lib contributors on the song. Gambino's dancing is contrasted against moments of violence. Only 53 seconds into the video, Gambino shoots a man in the back of the head with a handgun, while assuming a comical stance similar to a Jim Crow caricature. The first person depicted as being shot in the video, a guitarist who had been accompanying Gambino's singing up to that point, was musician Calvin the Second, but was initially mistaken by many viewers to be the father of 17-year-old gun violence victim Trayvon Martin. This first shooting also marks a transition in the music, from an African "folk-inspired melody" to "dark, pulsing trap".[23]

At a later point, Childish Gambino uses a Kalashnikov patternedautomatic weapon to gun down a church choir, which viewers have interpreted as a reference to the 2015 Charleston church shooting. In both instances, a child appears from off-screen holding a red cloth, on which Gambino gently lays the weapon used, while the bodies are simply dragged away, which viewers have interpreted "as a reference to Americans' willingness to protect gun rights over people". A group of children in school uniforms join Gambino in dancing, only to panic and scatter when the music imitates the sound of gunfire and Gambino positions his arms as if firing a gun, after which he lights a joint; this has been interpreted as a reference to school shootings, as well as a possible comparison of the demonization of marijuana users compared to the celebration of gun owners. Other schoolchildren are seen on a catwalk above, using their cell phones to record the chaos happening in the video as Gambino sings the lyrics "This a celly / That's a tool". Martha Tesema, writer for website Mashable, stated that "cell phones have been used as tools to broadcast police shooting, rioting against, or choking black people in this country". Throughout the video, numerous vehicles from several decades ago are featured, many of them with their hazard lights flashing and the driver's side door ajar, which critics interpreted as representing fatal police shootings during traffic stops, particularly the shooting of Philando Castile, who was shot while in a 1997 Oldsmobile; others have interpreted that the older model cars represent the relative lack of upward mobility of African Americans. American singer SZA makes a cameo appearance towards the end of the video, seated atop one of these vehicles. The video ends with Gambino in a darkened portion of the warehouse, fearfully running towards the camera while being chased by several white people. Viewers have said this resembles scenes from the 2017 film Get Out.

The dance moves were choreographed by Rwandan-born Sherrie Silver based on various African dances such as the Ghanaian Azonto, Nigerian Shoki the South African Gwara gwara as well as gyration or walking moves from Angola and Ivory Coast.[24]

Critical reception[edit]

Spencer Kornhaber of The Atlantic described the initial reaction on Twitter as "a gushing river of well-deserved praise" and the video as "the most talked-about music video of recent memory."[9] Daniel Kreps of Rolling Stone commented that the video "is a surreal, visceral statement about gun violence in America".[25]Pitchfork awarded the song the distinction of "Best New Track".[15]Billboard critics ranked it 10th among the "greatest music videos of the 21st century."[26] Mahita Gajanan of Time quoted music history professor Guthrie Ramsey at the University of Pennsylvania:

He's talking about the contradictions of trying to get money, the idea of being a black man in America. It comes out of two different sound worlds. Part of the brilliance of the presentation is that you go from this happy major mode of choral singing that we associate with South African choral singing, and then after the first gunshot it moves right into the trap sound.[27]

Will Gompertz, arts editor of the BBC, asserted that "This Is America" was a "powerful and poignant allegorical portrait of 21st Century America, which warrants a place among the canonical depictions of the USA from Grant Wood's American Gothic to Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, from Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware to America the Beautiful by Norman Lewis".[28]

In December 2018, Billboard ranked "This Is America" as the 6th best song of the year.[29]

The music video won the International Film Festival of the Art of Cinematography Camerimage Award for Best Cinematography in a Music Video,[30] as well as the Grammy Award for Best Music Video at the 61st Grammy Awards.

Cover versions and media appearances[edit]

Glover hosted the May 5 episode of the 43rd season of Saturday Night Live, and performed two new songs as Childish Gambino on the same episode, the second of which was "This Is America". Daniel Kaluuya, best known as the star of the film Get Out which the music video reportedly references, introduced the song's performance.[31][32]

Several artists attracted attention and millions of views for creating covers of the song and music video with altered lyrics and themes, retaining the song's instrumental and the general structure of its music video.[33][34] Nigerian rapper Falz released "This Is Nigeria" on May 25, highlighting the nation's issues with corruption and organized crime among others.[35][36]

The music video also spawned popular Internet memes, particularly those in which the audio was replaced so that Childish Gambino appeared to be dancing in time to another song. Versions using Carly Rae Jepsen's "Call Me Maybe" and Earth, Wind & Fire's "September" were some of the most viewed.[37][38]

The song is interpolated into a scene in the film Guava Island.

Chart performance[edit]

"This Is America" debuted at number one on the US Billboard Hot 100, becoming the 31st song to do so in the chart's history. It debuted with 78,000 downloads sold and 65.3 million US streams in the first week. Its music video accounted for 68% of the song's streaming total. "This Is America" is also Gambino's first top 10; he previously reached number 12 in August 2017 with "Redbone". "This Is America" overtook Drake's "Nice for What" from the top position for two weeks. Gambino is also the second Emmy Award-winning actor to reach number one on the Hot 100, the first being Justin Timberlake, who topped the chart with "Can't Stop the Feeling!" in 2016.[39] It topped the Hot 100 for two weeks, and left the top ten after five weeks.

Credits and personnel[edit]

Credits are adapted from Tidal.[4]

Charts[edit]

Weekly charts[edit]

Year-end charts[edit]

Certifications[edit]

Release history[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^Cornish, Audie (May 7, 2018). "Donald Glover's 'This Is America' Holds Ugly Truths To Be Self-Evident". NPR. Retrieved May 9, 2018.
  2. ^Jenkins, Craig (May 17, 2018). "The Internet Has Already Devoured 'This Is America'". Vulture. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  3. ^ abRolli, Bryan (May 9, 2018). "'This Is America' Is Childish Gambino's Most Authentic Musical Evolution Yet". Forbes. Retrieved 10 November 2020.
  4. ^ ab"This Is America / Childish Gambino". Tidal. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  5. ^"61st Annual GRAMMY Awards". GRAMMY.com. 6 December 2018.
  6. ^Arcand, Rob (May 6, 2018). "Childish Gambino Debuts Politically-Charged New Song "This is America" on SNL: Watch". Spin. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  7. ^ abGuan, Frank (May 7, 2018). "What It Means When Childish Gambino Says 'This Is America'". Vulture. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  8. ^
  9. ^ abcKornhaber, Spencer (May 7, 2018). "Donald Glover Is Watching You Watch Him". The Atlantic. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  10. ^"2019 GRAMMY Awards: Complete Nominations List". 7 December 2018. Retrieved 26 December 2018.
  11. ^Espinoza, Joshua (May 6, 2018). "Here Are the Rappers Who Contributed to Childish Gambino's "This Is America"". Complex. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  12. ^Tesema, Martha (May 6, 2018). "Donald Glover tackles gun violence in powerful video for 'This Is America,' his new single". Mashable. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  13. ^Holland, Jesse J. (May 9, 2018). "'This Is America' seals Glover's rep as protest artist". AP News. Retrieved May 10, 2018.
  14. ^France, Lisa Respers (May 7, 2018). "'This Is America': The Childish Gambino video explained". CNN. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  15. ^ ab""This Is America" by Childish Gambino Review

    Donald Glover has been ignoring 'This Is America' critics: 'I'm really sensitive'

    Donald Glover hasn’t really addressed his provocative new music video for “This Is America,” apart from a few words to Entertainment Tonight: “I just wanted to make, you know, a good song. Something people could play on Fourth of July.” As of right now at least, the performer, known as Childish Gambino, just can’t deal with the hot takes.

    Glover appeared on Thursday’s Jimmy Kimmel Live Thursday to talk all things Solo: A Star Wars Story, in which he plays a young Lando Calrissian, but he also spoke briefly about how he’s been ignoring all the critics of “This Is America.”

    You’ve probably seen a fewof theseanalyses online, or the Twitter thread from Dear White People creator Justin Simien dissecting the imagery, but apparently Glover hasn’t dived in. “Some friends have sent a couple, but to be real, I haven’t been on the internet since Thursday night before the Saturday Night Live,” said Glover, who hosted the NBC sketch comedy series this past weekend. “Yeah, just ’cause it’s like I don’t want to be in all the mix. It’s bad for me. I’m really sensitive, so I’m like I’ll just let it be.”

    “I see one negative thing and I track that person down,” he joked. “I will go into their Instagram and be like, ‘You’re not so great! That baby isn’t even that cute!'”

    Directed by Hiro Murai, “This Is America” has amassed more than 75 million views on YouTube since it dropped on Saturday night. The video features a chaotic assemblage of images that reflect topics affecting the black community in America, including police brutality and gun violence.

    But there’s little rest for Glover in this business. His mind now seems to be on Solo: A Star Wars Story, which is hitting theaters this May 25. He dished to Kimmel about the experience playing Lando, walking around with his Star Wars fan father on the film’s set, and chatting with original Lando actor Billy Dee Williams.

    “I called my dad first and told him, and that was a big moment,” Glover said of when he first found out he got the job. “He was proud. And then I went and got a large cheese pizza and then went home and watched Empire Strikes Back. That was it. It was like research.”

    Watch the clips of Glover on Jimmy Kimmel Live above.

    ABC's "Jimmy Kimmel Live" - Season 15

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    Источник: https://ew.com/music/2018/05/11/donald-glover-this-is-america-critics-jimmy-kimmel/

    The night I watched Childish Gambino’s video for “This Is America,” I was scared. Having skipped the song’s premiere on Saturday Night Live, I’d seen the images and their deconstructions on the internet all weekend. And when I finally sat down to watch the full product, as opposed to just a collection of GIFs and clips, I didn’t even have it in me to turn on the sound.

    When it comes to “what people on the internet say about black [insert word here],” I am instantly leery. And, as a matter of course, I’m instantly fearful of any form of black public expression that white people either identify as something they can’t live without or pull away from. With zero sound, the images from Donald Glover’s latest musical project felt like monsters under the bed.

    I had a nightmare that night.

    The next morning, the headlines were predictable, analytical and, in a basic way, accurate. Yes, Glover’s new work combines (insert description for juxtaposition of serious and jovial that represents how black people either stay sane, or don’t). And the new work certainly was designed to provoke (insert group of people here who don’t want to believe that the symbolism of black people killing other black people is ever effective). It is all of these things, certainly.

    The specific mimicry of deplorable stereotypes that call back to an era we try to forget.

    It wasn’t that I needed someone else to show me in video form exactly what’s torn our nation apart. It’s that with no real major tricks or magic, he could scare me enough into remembering that I won’t see this disaster alleviated in my lifetime. Which, in itself, compounds the original fear, which is why this video is keeping me up at night. As the kids say, I’ve never felt more seen in my life.

    Sometimes I don’t automatically wake up from a nightmare, even when I know I’m having one. There’s a weird part of me that knows I’m sleeping and wants to explore whether or not I can tackle the specific fear. In this video, there’s an eerily similar pace: Things come and go, and images from the recesses from your brain pop up in ways you never imagined.

    You’ve already read about the guns. The choir. The white horse. The cars. The African dance influences. And, of course, SZA. But those are specifics in a deliberate and detailed oeuvre already witnessed by likely more than hundreds of millions of people.

    But to be clear, this isn’t about anointing Glover/Gambino as some saint. We’ve all seen how problematic that turns out in many cases, and it’s also unfair to the artists themselves. The “genius” category puts everything in a spotlight that is skewed and often pointless — and this is not to discredit Glover’s work by any means.

    However, Glover is not without his wild statements that some may find problematic. He’s said a few things about women of color, specifically Asian women, that are gross on every level. There are a slew of other things — about rape, about the Black Lives Matter movement — that would make some immediately write him off. He believes, specifically with regard to comedy, that “nothing is off-limits.”

    The difference between Glover and, say, Kanye West (who is completely outta control; these theories of performance art, while perhaps buyable, are stupid on his part) or Kendrick Lamar or any other number of black male artists who’ve been elevated as creative stalwarts is that Glover’s done it almost completely from the inside. He was a writer for the beloved 30 Rock, and then Tina Fey turned around and embarrassed everyone. He starred on Community, a show that, while not a ratings monster, was beloved by an interesting sect of America. You might recall that comedy legend Chevy Chase, whose character was noted for his “curmudgeonly racism,” was booted off that program.

    FX’s Atlantaspeaks for itself in terms of impact, scope and influence, but the fact that he got such a plum gig at all is an indication of exactly how much Hollywood loves him. And that’s before we even get to the Grammy nominations, his movies and his historic role as Lando Calrissian in the upcomingSolo: A Star Wars Story. Glover is an insider who’s been allowed to influence within the real framework of the Hollywood system, as opposed to crash-landing as an outsider.

    Which is important to take into consideration when we view “This Is America.” Glover’s been making content in many forms for years, and what the new song and video represent is a magnum opus-like culmination of all of that. The sequencing of the video alone is incredible. What the artist presents as chaos is less about being happenstance and random and more about being inevitable and ever-present. That’s a reality that’s hard to portray in such a short space of time. It’s also scary.

    The inevitability of destruction. The specific mimicry of deplorable stereotypes that call back to an era we try to forget. Watching him dance the Jim Crow dance is jarring and familiar, which is both equally bizarre and, again, frightening — the real scope of the black experience in this country. It replays over and over again on television, movies, the internet and, yes, music videos. Glover/Gambino is not exploiting as much as he’s reminding us how well-woven all of it is into our consciousness. And, just like in a dream, where you’re never really sure what’s real and what’s a perverse version of your brain creating a reality you don’t know you can trust, this video makes you ask questions. How am I supposed to know what everything means if it’s all free-flowing, dangerous and unstoppable? That’s the reality of being black in this country in 2018.

    We live in a nation where we have to create apps in order not to waste food. School administrators get violent with kids who are just looking to celebrate their educations. The Ku Klux Klan is legit making a comeback. Police officers are outfitting their cars with the words popo, so we can apparently feel better about fearing for our lives because the tormentors appear with a familiar name. Even with that being well-known, our generational trauma somehow allows us to make fun of the very specific way that we choose to kill each other. It’s insane on every level.

    We’ve got 4-year-olds who are adept at handling guns.

    They do so in front of women appropriating cultures they don’t respect. Yet, all the while, these presentations of Gambino’s are somehow inspirational because it’s all we’ve ever had.

    The final part of this video is the most harrowing because it’s an indication of what I believe to be Glover’s real message: that the capitulation to actual fear results in a flight response that only descendants of slaves can understand. While running for his life from what appears to be a mob of people, the look on his face says it all. Trying to escape in a dark hallway to nothing, the people are gaining on him. He appears to be losing steam but is determined not to stop. The examination of that inner feeling of helplessness that is so often the black experience is what’s most important here. Glover taps into that sentiment in a way that’s hard to grasp if you’ve never lived it.

    I’m instantly fearful of any form of black public expression that white people either identify as something they can’t live without or pull away from.

    Sure, we all know this is a barbaric and screwed-up place on many levels. But it’s also a place where we’ve found a way to thrive in the worst of conditions: shirtless, deliberate and composed. He can sing about staying woke and its importance of that until he’s blue in the face, but “This Is America” reminds us that the reality is actually scarier than the nightmare we’ve been trapped in since we got here. Waking up might not get you anything but more pain, more despair and, thus, fewer years to enjoy the rights and privileges of life.

    That is America. And that’s exactly what it was created to be.

    Clinton Yates is a tastemaker at The Undefeated. He likes rap, rock, reggae, R&B, and remixes — in that order.

    Источник: https://theundefeated.com/features/childish-gambinos-this-is-america-video-is-a-beautiful-nightmare/

    Why is Donald Glover shirtless in this is America?

    Why is Donald Glover shirtless in this is America?

    He’s shirtless for a reason. Glover’s exposed torso is there to remind us that he is black and vulnerable, according to Yahoo’s Ken Tucker.

    Why the dancing makes this is America so uncomfortable to watch?

    Why The Dancing In Childish Gambino’s ‘This Is America’ Is So Uncomfortable To Watch. It’s our own kinesthetic empathy – the action of mirror neurons in the brain that makes us want to move along as we see someone else dance. “An internal struggle begins in the viewer’s body, which is pulled between joy and horror.

    What does the white horse in this is America mean?

    In the Bible, Revelations 6:8 (KJV) reads: “And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and the name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him.” According to the scripture, the appearance of four horsemen signifies the oncoming apocalypse – with death represented by the final, white one.

    What do the old cars symbolize in this is America?

    People on social media have largely drawn two conclusions, the first being that the empty cars represent the news stories of black men killed by police during traffic stops. The second, is that the empty and abandoned cars could represent the stalled economic mobility of many black Americans.

    Why does Childish Gambino dance like that?

    In the layered messaging of the video, the dancing has been seen as a distraction from the violence and disturbing symbolism all around Glover’s musical alter-ego Childish Gambino. “There are a lot of dark themes in it, so they wanted us to be the light of the video,” Silver told Pigeons and Planes.

    Why is it called Childish Gambino?

    Donald Glover confirmed in an interview with Fuse that his name came from The Wu-Tang Name Generator, he even spoke to RZA about it. The Wu-Tang Name Generator is a fun computer name app that creates you a rap name based on your real name. Donald entered his name into the generator and thus, Childish Gambino was born.

    Why is dance so important in Africa?

    In Africa, as with other parts of the world, ceremonial dance tells a story. More than mere entertainment, it recounts history, conveys emotion, celebrates rites of passage, and helps to unify communities. “African dance” is usually associated with sub-Saharan and Western Africa.

    Who are the dancers in this is America?

    Two of the four young dancers are Bakersfield siblings Trinity and Devin Penn, who were cast as dancers in Gambino’s music video and recent “Saturday Night Live” performance.

    Who is the girl in this is America?

    Nicole Arbour

    Who is will in this is America?

    The song features background vocals by American rappers Young Thug (who also has writing credit as Williams), Slim Jxmmi of Rae Sremmurd, BlocBoy JB, Quavo of Migos, and 21 Savage.

    What is Childish Gambino’s real name?

    Donald McKinley Glover

    What do the numbers mean Childish Gambino?

    The album, entitled “3.15. 20,” was officially released Sunday, March 22, but was named after the date it was dropped on a dedicated website before being pulled. Time is a concept woven into the album: Most of the songs have numbers in the title, which represent their time stamp on the album.

    Is Childish Gambino R&B?

    “Awaken, My Love!” is the third studio album by American rapper Donald Glover, under his stage name Childish Gambino. Consisting of tracks being sung rather than rapped, its fusion of psychedelic soul, funk and R&B influences was considered a bold departure from the predominantly hip hop style of his prior work.

    What was Childish Gambino’s last album on 3.15 20?

    Many of us have feared the day Donald Glover, also known as Childish Gambino, would release his final album. Gambino’s musical persona has pushed boundaries in the music industry for 15 years, and while “3.15.20” is his final creation, its many layers will keep the album compelling for years to come.

    What is the meaning of 3.15 20?

    what we thought was strong is weak

    Who produces for Childish Gambino?

    Ludwig Göransson

    Is Childish Gambino making more music?

    20 in March via a website, but on Friday he broke his social media silence to tweet an announcement of a new “music project.” He’s pretty excited about it: “last music project was probably my best,” he said of 3.15. 20, “but the one coming will be my biggest by far.” last music project was probably my best.

    Is human sacrifice on Childish Gambino’s new album?

    The album also features artists Ariana Grande, SZA and 21 Savage. Interestingly, the songs “Saturday” and “Human Sacrifice” were omitted from the track list. Glover has been adamant over the past several years that he will retire the Gambino moniker after the release of his next studio album.

    Who is on Childish Gambino’s album?

    20′ consists of mostly new music, and features collaborators including Ariana Grande, 21 Savage and Ludwig Göransson. Glover’s 2019 single ‘Algorhythm’, which he shared via an augmented reality app, also features. The music that was initially released last weekend included Gambino’s 2018 single ‘Feels Like Summer’.

    Who is featured on Childish Gambino’s album?

    Childish Gambino’s New Album Features Ariana Grande And 21 Savage — And Fans Are Loving It. Donald Glover’s peculiar countdown on donaldgloverpresents.com expired on March 22 and with the strike of zero came the release of 3.15.

    Will Childish Gambino make another album?

    Donald Glover details next Childish Gambino album to come, alludes to ensuing ‘Atlanta’ seasons. The impending project will follow Glover’s most recent release as Childish Gambino, 3.15. 20, which arrived in March.

    Does Childish Gambino still rap?

    But this is his first album-length release since 2016’s Awaken My Love—and it could be his last. He’s long promised to retire his Childish Gambino alter ego, and has said that this would be his final album. ‘” he told HuffPost in 2016 about his decision to end his music career.

    Is Childish Gambino retiring?

    Glover announced on Saturday at Governor’s Ball Music Festival in New York City that his next album will be his last album. “I’ll see you for the last Gambino album,” he said at the end of his performance.

    How much is Donald Glover worth?

    Donald Glover is a true multihyphenate, gaining fame as both a musician and actor. The “Atlanta” creator and star — also known as Childish Gambino — has racked up a net worth of $35 million through his numerous talents, according to Celebrity Net Worth. Here’s a quick look at Glover’s stats: Net worth: $35 million.

    16/08/2019Manon WilcoxFAQ

    Источник: https://colors-newyork.com/why-is-donald-glover-shirtless-in-this-is-america/

    ‘This Is America’: strengths and paradoxes of a critique of violence

    After it was released on 5 May 2018, the music video by Donald Glover (alias Childish Gambino) ‘This Is America,’ quickly went viral. It unleashed passionate debates across both social networks and traditional media. The video generated hundreds of discussions in newspaper articles, videos and blog posts, echoing thousands of tweets, images and comments posted on several social media. Aside from some texts that analyze the political dimension of the video by putting them in the wider context of Donald Glover’s artistic career, the majority of articles and videos promise to reveal the symbolism, references, “hidden meanings” or “theories” behind ‘This Is America’. These explanations, which consist of deciphering some of the historical or perceived references in the video’s images and words, are largely based on comments posted on Twitter or in other articles across the Internet.

    Childish Gambino’s exaggerated gestures and movements, his unassailable and unpredictable body, seem to be a cry of anger against the structural violence suffered by African-American citizens. The video clip is a strong criticism of gun worship in the United States, and for a few people Donald Glover’s virtuoso work renews the American tradition of protest songs. However his criticism of consumer society and the entertainment industry seems less obvious. If ‘This Is America’ was seen over two hundred million times on YouTube in three weeks, it also means tens of millions of online ads viewed by the same people and millions of dollars in advertising revenue. Paradoxically, the vast majority of articles on ‘This Is America’ are silent on Donald Glover’s activities in the entertainment industry and the political consequences of his participation in films produced by studios owned by the Walt Disney Company. The commodification of Glover’s body asks the fundamental question: to whom do our bodies belong? This post examines some of the strengths and paradoxes of ‘This Is America’, a provocative piece of art.

    Aesthetic distance and multiplicity of interpretations

    The richness and symbolic density of ‘This Is America’ encourage multiple interpretations, most of them with a strong political content: criticism of the violence generated by social injustice and racial discrimination; condemnation of the cult of arms in the United States; denunciation of the shameful legacy of segregationist laws.1 The execution of a black man, seated and with a cloth bag over his head, by a bullet in the back of his head could be seen as the denunciation of the armed violence in the United States on African-American citizens. Gambino’s gospel choir shooting could be a reference to the shootings perpetrated in the United States in a Methodist church in 2015 and in a Baptist church in 2017. The various dances performed by Childish Gambino accompanied by black girls and boys dressed in school uniforms would aim to divert our attention away from the violence that takes place in the background, similarly mass consumerism and social networks distract us from the violence endured by our fellow citizens. Gambino’s exaggerated movements and postures could be a reference to the racialized behaviour of the character of Jim Crow, whose name was given to laws legitimizing racial segregation in the southern states of the United States from the late 19th century until the mid-1960s. The knight who crosses the back of the post-industrial scene of the video on a white horse could be one of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse. Finally, the nightmarish chase at the end of the video could refer to the horror movieGet out.

    Donald Glover refuses to provide the media with a ready-made explanation of the meaning of his work. He insists that it is the viewers who must form their own opinion and, therefore, that all aesthetic and political readings are valid. In doing this, Glover introduces what the philosopher Jacques Rancière called the ‘aesthetic distance’, a form of art effectiveness based on “the suspension of every determinate relation correlating the production of art forms and a specific social function.”2 This assumed polysemy of the work allows its appropriation and mobilization by various actors in the political field in order to break the dominant consensus. According to Rancière, this makes it possible to create a political community where “the excluded is a conflictual actor […] carrying a right not yet recognized or witnessing an injustice in the existing state of right.”3

    Armed violence and sonic spaces

    When watching ‘This Is America,’ the viewer is surprised by the abrupt changes in the attitude of Childish Gambino, the character played by Donald Glover, which precede the performance of the African American guitarist and then the members of the church choir. The contrast between Gambino’s emotions and gestures before the executions and the moments of the act is brutal. Moreover, these outbreaks of armed violence seem arbitrary and inexplicable in the context of the actions shown to us. They are all the more incomprehensible as the people executed participated in the smooth running of a collective musical action. Before they were shot to death they were part of the music.

    Structurally and narratively, the moments of the performances mark the transition between lyrical sections, with voice-overs and/or the choir singing and dancing, with sections where Childish Gambino begins rapping in the first person with the phrase “This is America”. The perception we have of an acceleration of things happening in video is subtly driven by the mixing of two heterogeneous sonic spaces within the video clip. On the one hand there is the song itself: it was recorded, mixed and mastered in the studio (so the video is not a live recording of the song). On the other hand are the sounds that seem to come from the space where the video is filmed: screams, sounds of riots. The postindustrial hangar is first shown empty, then gradually fills up with people facing the police symbolized by a car, people running or dancing and even an ‘apocalyptic’ white horse.

    Sonogram of ‘This Is America’: structure and narrative elements

    Our attention is constantly held by the contrasts between the sections, the unpredictability of the narration and the growing presence of the hangar’s sonic space. Then suddenly, there is a 15-second break, when Childish Gambino shoots an imaginary weapon at an off-field target. We hear the sounds of people running and screaming, before he lights what appears to be a cannabis joint. Donald Glover gives us clues about this gesture in a recent interview published in The New Yorker, where he makes the link between the trauma caused by the violence suffered by African Americans and their use of cannabis, stating that the black characters of his TV series Atlanta “aren’t smoking weed all the time because it’s cool but because they have P.T.S.D.—every black person does.”4

    The politics of the black body and structural violence

    The silence of the long 15-second break sets in motion a transition that leads us to another space, a nightmarish reality where Gambino is pursued by a crowd of people who probably want him dead. He runs for his life while the voice-over sings “You just a black man in this world, You just a barcode, You just a black man in this world…”

    Throughout the video we are caught up in the gestures and movements of the bodies dancing in the foreground as well as the bodies moving, struggling and shouting in the background. They are black bodies that denounce through their gestures the historical violence to which they have been subjected, the null value of their lives in the face of firearms that take their existence away in a second. Childish Gambino’s body does not leave us indifferent, it seduces, surprises, frightens. He recalls the price to pay for centuries of oppression, this coming only a few days after rapper Kanye West, a vocal supporter of President Donald Trump, declared that 400 years of slavery seemed to him to be a choice for those who had suffered it. As Ta-Nehisi Coates says, “America understands itself as God’s handiwork, but the black body is the clearest evidence that America is the work of men.”5

    On the paradoxes of ‘This is America’: to whom do our bodies belong?

    Just as Donald Glover uses his body to denounce gun violence, the confusion of genres and contradictions of the entertainment industry are also manifestly embodied in his body and in the use that the Walt Disney Company can make of him. Glover asserts: “I’m scanned into ‘Star Wars’ now, my face and body.” He is aware of the consequences of Walt Disney owning the image of his body, not only for the purpose of marketing Star Wars products but also for producing other films based on his digital image. “Who’s to say that at some point they won’t take that scan and say, ‘Let’s make another movie with Donald. He’s been dead for fifteen years, but we can do whatever we want with him’.”6 Even dead, Glover’s body can generate capital for his owners. As Jason Stanyek and Benjamin Piekut asserted, “in late capitalism, the dead are highly productive.”7

    The contrast on how Donald Glover uses his body in this Star Wars ad and in ‘This Is America’ is striking. He embodies the paradoxes inherent in the neoliberal chaos of the United States, this ‘America’ of which he speaks. The considerable impact of ‘This Is America’ should not hide the issues raised by its commercial dimension and the appropriation of this work by the entertainment industry and web giants. Even if the mix of genres assumed by its author could be considered as a strategy of circumvention or symbolic inversion, ‘This Is America’ asks the question: to whom do our bodies belong? This question is fundamental because it is closely linked both to slavery – the power to dispose and destroy bodies – and to the consumerist enslavement produced by our neoliberal societies of control.

    Cite this article as: Luis Velasco-Pufleau, "‘This Is America’: strengths and paradoxes of a critique of violence," in Music, Sound and Conflict, 01/08/2018, https://msc.hypotheses.org/937.


    Источник: https://msc.hypotheses.org/937

    Childish Gambino 'This Is America': All of the hidden references in hit music video

    While Donald Glover was hosting Saturday Night Live this past weekend, he took the stage as his alter-ego Childish Gambino to debut his new single "This Is America." Following his dynamic performance, Glover released the track online alongside its official music video, which addresses the realities of America head-on. The music video left viewers with a lot to unpack as Glover put on a one-man show full of allusions to recent news items.

    From gun violence to a looming apocalypse, we've dissected the hidden meanings within Glover's latest visual masterpiece below.

    The man strumming the guitar - At the beginning of the video a man who looks like Trayvon Martin's father - portrayed by Calvin The Second - plays the guitar. It's a moment that gives a nod to 17-year-old Martin, who was fatally shot by George Zimmerman in 2012.

    Glover shooting the man playing a guitar - The seated man returns to the shot with a hood covering his head as Glover strikes a Jim Crow pose before shooting him.

    (Credit: YouTube

    The red cloth - This piece of fabric - brought out by a well-dressed man - is used to carefully and reverentially cover the gun Glover used to shoot the guitar-playing man. It alludes to the fact that guns seem to be prized above people to many Americans. As the dead man's body is dragged off-screen, Glover continues to smile and dance as if nothing is wrong: as if a black body isn't worth as much as the gun that was used for murder.

    The murder of the choir - Glover once again addresses gun violence by shooting an assault rifle at a harmless church choir. It's likely a reference to the 2015 massacre at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina.

    (Credit: YouTube

    The kids dancing - A group of kids who dance around Glover represent how the world consumes social media and entertainment as the world burns around them. It's unclear whether or not it's escapism or a coping mechanism, but it's the way life is. The kids' are seemingly clad in uniforms that South African students wear and are dancing to Blocboy JB's shoot dance to the gwara-gwara - a South African dance. The dancing also seems to be a sense of pride and protection from the chaos of the world.

    Older cars - At the end of the video, cars from two to three decades ago are front-and-centre: something that possibly references Philando Castile who was murdered in his '97 Oldsmobile, or just the long legacy of fatal police shootings.

    Students walk out of US schools to protest gun violence

    Show all 10

    Hooded figure on a horse - A hooded figure riding a white horse gallops across the screen so quickly you might miss it, but it is likely a reference to the Horsemen of the Apocalypse in the Bible. In other words, it refers to the end of the world. According to the Bible, the first horse was white, which mimics the imagery found in "This Is America."

    Источник: https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/music/features/childish-gambino-donald-glover-this-is-america-hidden-references-music-video-a8342031.html

    Donald Glover’s ‘This Is America’ Explained by 2 People Who Don’t Pretend to Understand It

    Since Donald Glover/Childish Gambino released the awe-inspiring video for his song “This Is America,” the internet has been filled with people explaining the symbolism of the imagery, subtext and subtle references contained in the music video.

    Those people don’t know shit.

    Instead of overwhelming you with bullshit phrases gleaned from an art-appreciation class, we decided to have two uniquely qualified critics explain the video in terms anyone can understand:

    • Michael Harriotis a staff writer at The Root. As someone who studied film as an undergrad and travels the country as one of the country’s top-ranked poets whose poems often include the word “motherfucker,” he has examined the video a total of at least three times.
    • Stephen A. Crockett Jr., a senior editor at The Root, was kicked out of the Museum of Modern Art when he alerted a security guard that someone had thrown up on one of the Jackson Pollock paintings.

    Michael Harriot: We can’t begin without addressing the subject of Childish Gambino’s decision to go topless in the video. I think this is a commentary on our obsession with perfect body images. His lack of a shirt symbolizes our need to see normalized bodies.

    Stephen A. Crockett Jr.: Nah, bruh. I think this nigga just doesn’t do pushups. Not to disparage him, but if I was rich, I wouldn’t work out, either. We also must remember that he just finished filming the new Star Wars movie as Lando Calrissian. His lack of definition could be explained by the fact that weights don’t work in space. They probably didn’t have Bowflex on the Millennium Falcon.

    MH: As someone who has never seen a Star Wars movie, I could be wrong, but I’m pretty sure they didn’t film it in space. So what do you think the man playing the guitar symbolizes?

    SAC: The man with the guitar clearly symbolizes slavery. As with most black art, slavery can be used to explain anything you don’t understand. Or Kanye. The man with the guitar is old Kanye, who is promptly executed by being shot in the head—e.g., new Kanye wearing a “Make America Great Again” hat. It is the execution of old Kanye and the death of string music.

    MH: So you’re saying Donald Glover wants to kill Kanye? Aight. I like how there is chaos in the background throughout the video. Is Childish the distraction, or are the harsh realities going on in the background the true distraction?

    SAC: I think the true distraction is Gambino’s dancing. He dances like someone donald glover this is america meaning thinks he can dance because he only dances when he’s around white people. Gambino is showing all his white friends that if he’s invited to their wedding, he will lead them in all the line dances they don’t understand.

    MH: But notice that the kid background dancers are the only pleasant part of the video who survive. That’s powerful commentary right there.

    SAC: Why did he have to shoot the choir, though?

    MH: Because their part in the hook was finished, which made them disposable. And guns. And the Charleston, Iboc church jobs, Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church massacre. And the police were coming.

    SAC: Notice that the police don’t chase the black kids who are smiling, dancing and dressed in uniforms. They don’t kill the harmless blacks. Wait . did somebody just ride through in a white horse?

    MH: Yep. I think it symbolizes heroin. Or that a hero on a white horse won’t save us. The really unrelatable part of the video is when he pulls out a joint. Who still smokes joints besides white people and rich people?

    SAC: That and Gambino’s disco chest hair were the oddest parts of the video to me. Joints are for black guys who ride longboards and wear surf shorts and pajama tops as regular shirts. I wonder if his chest hairs got caught in his space suit in Star Wars?

    MH: Bruh, I honestly don’t think the set was actually in outer space. Gambino is actually continuing the black tradition of woke black chest hair. In which black men liberate their taco meats . oh shit, Kanye’s back at the end! I really doubted your observation, but now I understand the Kanye symbolism. There’s a bag over his head, but he’s still singing! He has no idea what’s going on. Yeah, it’s definitely Kanye.

    SAC: Wait. Is that SZA? How penfed high interest savings account she just show up at the end?

    MH: Because, like this video, everyone pretends to understand what she’s saying, but no one really does.

    SAC: I really like her song “The Weekend,” though.

    MH: You listen to the Weeknd? I can’t listen to him. I can’t take a hood nigga serious if he sings falsetto.

    SAC: Not the singer the Weeknd. The song “The Weekend,” by SZA.

    MH: Ohhh! Yeah. I especially like the part where she says, “Oisrkjbe wrojgvfws the weekeeend.”

    SAC: I actually think it’s “Uerwg wsouhg saljhfs the weeeeekeeeend.”

    MH: My only criticism of the video is the full-body shot of him running at the end. It’s so unathletic. Now I understand why he cut away from that scene in Atlanta where he was going to race Michael Vick.

    SAC: You’re being too harsh. You don’t have to run in space. Maybe he was running like Lando would.

    MH: Bruh, Star Wars is not a documentary! I don’t think they shot it in real outer space!

    SAC: How do you know that? You just said you’ve never seen Star Wars! I bet that’s where he got the joint from. Some of that good Jedi weed. That’s probably why SZA is there. She wants to take a hit so she can compose more nonsensical lyrics. I always thought Lando Calrissian enjoyed a nice spliff with his Colt 45.

    MH: I don’t think you understand anything about how . anyway, the video is dope. I’m pretty sure everyone understands it now.

    SAC: I’m glad we could help.

    Источник: https://www.theroot.com/donald-glovers-this-is-america-explained-by-2-people-wh-1825858343

    ‘This Is America’: strengths and paradoxes of a critique of violence

    After it was released on 5 May 2018, the music video by Donald Glover (alias Childish Gambino) ‘This Is America,’ quickly went viral. It unleashed passionate debates across both social networks and traditional media. The video generated hundreds of discussions in newspaper articles, videos and blog posts, echoing thousands of tweets, images and comments posted on several social media. Aside from some texts that analyze the political dimension of the video by putting them in the wider context of Seth wadley chrysler dodge jeep ram pauls valley ok Glover’s artistic career, the majority of articles and videos promise to reveal the symbolism, references, “hidden meanings” or “theories” behind ‘This Is America’. These explanations, which consist of deciphering some of the historical or perceived references in the video’s images and words, are largely based on comments posted donald glover this is america meaning Twitter or in other articles across the Internet.

    Childish Gambino’s exaggerated gestures and movements, his unassailable and unpredictable body, seem to be a cry of anger against the structural violence suffered by African-American citizens. The video clip is a strong criticism of gun worship in the United States, and for a few people Donald Glover’s virtuoso work renews the American tradition of protest songs. However his criticism of consumer society and the entertainment industry seems less obvious. If ‘This Is America’ was seen over two hundred million times on YouTube in three weeks, it also means tens of millions of online ads viewed by the same people and millions of dollars in advertising revenue. Paradoxically, the vast majority of articles on ‘This Is America’ are silent on Donald Glover’s activities in the entertainment industry and the political consequences of new us bank mobile app participation in films produced by studios owned by the Walt Disney Company. The commodification of Glover’s body asks the fundamental question: to whom do our bodies belong? This post examines some of the strengths and paradoxes of ‘This Is America’, a provocative piece of art.

    Aesthetic distance and multiplicity of interpretations

    The richness and symbolic density of ‘This Is America’ encourage multiple interpretations, most of them with a strong political content: criticism of the violence ally financial cockeysville maryland address by social injustice and racial discrimination; condemnation of the cult of arms in the United States; denunciation of the shameful legacy of segregationist laws.1 The execution of a black man, seated and with a cloth bag over his head, by a bullet in the back of his head could be seen as the denunciation of the armed violence in the United States on African-American citizens. Gambino’s gospel choir shooting could be a reference to the shootings perpetrated in the United States in a Methodist church in 2015 and in a Baptist church in 2017. The various dances performed by Childish Gambino accompanied by black girls and boys dressed in school uniforms would aim to divert our attention away from the violence that takes place in the background, similarly mass consumerism and social networks distract us from the violence endured by our fellow citizens. Gambino’s exaggerated movements and postures could be a reference to the racialized behaviour of the character of Jim Crow, whose name was given to laws legitimizing racial segregation in the southern states of the United States from the late 19th century until the mid-1960s. The knight who crosses the back of the post-industrial scene of the video on a white horse could be one of the four horsemen of the Apocalypse. Finally, the nightmarish chase at the end of the video could refer to the horror movieGet out.

    Donald Glover refuses to provide the media with a ready-made explanation of the meaning of his work. He insists that it is the viewers who must form their own opinion and, therefore, that all aesthetic and political readings are valid. In doing this, Glover introduces what the philosopher Jacques Rancière called the ‘aesthetic distance’, a form of art effectiveness based on “the suspension of every determinate relation correlating the production of art forms and a specific social function.”2 This assumed polysemy of the work allows its appropriation and mobilization by various actors in the political field in order to break the dominant consensus. According to Rancière, this makes it possible to create a political community where “the excluded is a conflictual actor […] carrying a right not yet recognized or witnessing an injustice in the existing state of right.”3

    Armed violence and sonic spaces

    When watching ‘This What time does huntington bank close America,’ the viewer is surprised by the abrupt changes in the attitude of Childish Gambino, the character played by Donald Glover, which precede the performance of the African American guitarist and then the members of the church choir. The contrast between Gambino’s emotions and gestures before the executions and the moments of the act is brutal. Moreover, these outbreaks of armed violence seem arbitrary and inexplicable in the context of the actions shown to us. They are all the more incomprehensible as the people executed participated in the smooth running of a collective musical action. Before they were shot to death they were part of the music.

    Structurally and narratively, the moments of the performances mark the transition between lyrical sections, with voice-overs and/or the choir singing and dancing, with sections where Childish Gambino begins rapping in the first person with the phrase “This is America”. The perception we have of an acceleration of things happening in video is subtly driven by the mixing of two heterogeneous sonic spaces within the video clip. On the one donald glover this is america meaning there is the song itself: it was recorded, mixed and mastered in the studio (so the video is not a live recording of the song). On the other hand are the sounds that seem to come from the space where the video is filmed: screams, sounds of riots. The postindustrial hangar is first shown empty, then gradually fills up with people facing the police symbolized by a car, people running or dancing and even an ‘apocalyptic’ white horse.

    Sonogram of ‘This Is America’: structure and narrative elements

    Our attention is constantly held by the contrasts between the sections, the unpredictability of the narration and the growing presence of the hangar’s sonic space. Then suddenly, there is a 15-second break, when Childish Gambino shoots an imaginary weapon at an off-field target. We hear the sounds of people running and screaming, before he lights what appears to be a cannabis joint. Donald Glover gives us clues about this gesture in a recent interview published in The New Yorker, where he makes the link between the trauma caused by the violence suffered by African Americans and their use of cannabis, stating that the black characters of his TV series Atlanta “aren’t smoking weed all the time because it’s cool but because they have P.T.S.D.—every black person does.”4

    The politics of the black body and structural violence

    The silence of the long 15-second break sets in motion a transition that leads us to another space, a nightmarish reality where Gambino is pursued by pinnacle financial services careers crowd of people who probably want him dead. He runs for his life while the voice-over sings “You just a black man in this world, You just a barcode, You just a black man in this world…”

    Throughout the video we are caught up in the gestures and movements of the bodies dancing in the foreground as well as the bodies moving, struggling and shouting in the background. They are black bodies that denounce through their gestures the historical violence to which they have been subjected, the null value of their lives in the face of firearms that take their existence away in a second. Childish Gambino’s body does not leave us indifferent, it seduces, surprises, frightens. He recalls the price to pay for centuries of oppression, this coming only a few days after rapper Kanye West, a vocal supporter of President Donald Trump, declared that 400 years of slavery seemed to him to be a choice for those who had suffered it. As Ta-Nehisi Coates says, “America understands itself as God’s handiwork, but the black body is the clearest evidence that America is the work of men.”5

    On the paradoxes of ‘This is America’: to whom do our bodies belong?

    Just as Donald Glover uses his body to denounce gun violence, the confusion of genres and contradictions of the entertainment industry are also manifestly embodied in his body and in the use that the Walt Disney Company can make of him. Glover asserts: “I’m scanned into ‘Star Wars’ now, my face and body.” He is aware of the consequences of Walt Disney owning the image of his body, not only for the purpose of marketing Star Wars products but also for producing other films based on his digital image. “Who’s to say that at some point they won’t take that scan and say, ‘Let’s make another movie with Donald. He’s been dead for fifteen how to make cash advance using credit card, but we can do whatever we want with him’.”6 Even dead, Glover’s body can generate capital for his owners. As Jason Stanyek and Benjamin Piekut asserted, “in late capitalism, the dead are highly productive.”7

    The contrast on how Donald Glover uses his body in this Star Wars ad and in ‘This Is America’ is striking. He embodies the paradoxes inherent in the neoliberal chaos of the United States, this ‘America’ of which he speaks. The considerable impact of ‘This Is America’ should not hide the issues raised by its commercial dimension and the appropriation of this work by the entertainment industry and web giants. Even if the mix of genres assumed by its author could be considered as a strategy of circumvention or symbolic inversion, ‘This Is America’ asks the question: to whom do our bodies belong? This question is fundamental because it is closely linked both to slavery – the power to dispose and destroy bodies – and to the consumerist enslavement produced by our neoliberal societies of control.

    Cite this article as: Luis Velasco-Pufleau, "‘This Is America’: strengths and paradoxes of a critique of violence," in Music, Sound and Conflict, 01/08/2018, https://msc.hypotheses.org/937.


    Источник: https://msc.hypotheses.org/937
    Pitchfork". pitchfork.com. Retrieved May 11, 2018.
  16. ^Strauss, Matthew (June 25, 2018). "Childish Gambino Collaborator Denies "This Is America" Plagiarism Allegations". Pitchfork. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  17. ^Miller, Kai (June 25, 2018). "Childish Gambino Accused of Ripping Song for "This Is America"". XXL. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  18. ^Park, Andryea (June 26, 2018). "Childish Gambino's manager denies accusation of plagiarism over "This is America"". CBS News. Retrieved June 28, 2018.
  19. ^Klein, Jessica (May 9, 2018). "Childish Gambino's "This Is America" Clocks 55 Million Views In Just Four Days". www.tubefilter.com. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
  20. ^ChildishGambinoVEVO, Childish Gambino - This Is America (Official Music Video), retrieved 2019-01-08
  21. ^Coscarelli, Joe (2018-05-10). "Hiro Murai on the 'Atlanta' Finale and 'This Is America' Video". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019-01-08.
  22. ^Prettyman, Michele (2020). "The Persistence of "Wild Style": Hip-Hop and Music Video Culture at the Intersection of Performance and Provocation". Journal of Cinema and Media Studies. 59 (2): 151–157. doi:10.1353/cj.2020.0008. ISSN 2578-4919. S2CID 214502969.
  23. ^Amoako, Aida (2018-05-08). "Why the Dancing Makes 'This Is America' So Uncomfortable to Watch". The Antlantic. Retrieved 6 February 2019.
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External links[edit]

Awards for "This Is America"

Grammy Award for Record of the Year

1959−1980
  • "Nel Blu Dipinto Di Blu (Volare)" by Domenico Modugno (1959)
  • "Mack the Knife" by Bobby Darin (1960)
  • "Theme from A Summer Place" by Percy Faith (1961)
  • "Moon River" by Henry Mancini (1962)
  • "I Left My Heart in San Francisco" by Tony Bennett (1963)
  • "Days of Wine and Roses" by Henry Mancini (1964)
  • "The Girl from Ipanema" by Astrud Gilberto & Stan Getz (1965)
  • "A Taste of Honey" by Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass (1966)
  • "Strangers in the Night" by Frank Sinatra (1967)
  • "Up, Up and Away" by The 5th Dimension (Billy Davis Jr., Florence LaRue, Marilyn McCoo, Lamonte McLemore, Ron Townson) (1968)
  • "Mrs. Robinson" by Simon & Garfunkel (Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon) (1969)
  • "Aquarius/Let the Sunshine In" by The 5th Dimension (Billy Davis Jr., Florence LaRue, Marilyn McCoo, Lamonte McLemore, Ron Townson) (1970)
  • "Bridge over Troubled Water" by Simon & Garfunkel (Art Garfunkel, Paul Simon) (1971)
  • "It's Too Late" by Carole King (1972)
  • "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face" by Roberta Flack (1973)
  • "Killing Me Softly with His Song" by Roberta Flack (1974)
  • "I Honestly Love You" by Olivia Newton-John (1975)
  • "Love Will Keep Us Together" by Captain & Tennille (Daryl Dragon, Toni Tennille) (1976)
  • "This Masquerade" by George Benson (1977)
  • "Hotel California" by Eagles (Don Felder, Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Randy Meisner, Joe Walsh) (1978)
  • "Just the Way You Are" by Billy Joel (1979)
  • "What a Fool Believes" by The Doobie Brothers (Jeffrey Baxter, John Hartman, Keith Knudsen, Michael McDonald, Tiran Porter, Patrick Simmons) (1980)
1981−2000
  • "Sailing" by Christopher Cross (1981)
  • "Bette Davis Eyes" by Kim Carnes (1982)
  • "Rosanna" by Toto (David Hungate, Bobby Kimball, Steve Lukather, David Paich, Jeff Porcaro, Steve Porcaro) (1983)
  • "Beat It" by Michael Jackson (1984)
  • "What's Love Got to Do with It" by Tina Turner (1985)
  • "We Are the World" by USA for Africa (1986)
  • "Higher Love" by Steve Winwood (1987)
  • "Graceland" by Paul Simon (1988)
  • "Don't Worry, Be Happy" by Bobby McFerrin (1989)
  • "Wind Beneath My Wings" by Bette Midler (1990)
  • "Another Day in Paradise" by Phil Collins (1991)
  • "Unforgettable" by Natalie Cole with Nat King Cole (1992)
  • "Tears in Heaven" by Eric Clapton (1993)
  • "I Will Always Love You" by Whitney Houston (1994)
  • "All I Wanna Do" by Sheryl Crow (1995)
  • "Kiss from a Rose" by Seal (1996)
  • "Change the World" by Eric Clapton (1997)
  • "Sunny Came Home" by Shawn Colvin (1998)
  • "My Heart Will Go On" by Celine Dion (1999)
  • "Smooth" by Santana (Rodney Holmes, Tony Lindsay, Karl Perazzo, Raul Rekow, Benny Rietveld, Carlos Santana, Chester Thompson) featuring Rob Thomas (2000)
2001−2020
  • "Beautiful Day" by U2 (Bono, Adam Clayton, The Edge, Larry Mullen Jr.) (2001)
  • "Walk On" by U2 (Bono, Adam Clayton, The Edge, Larry Mullen Jr.) (2002)
  • "Don't Know Why" by Norah Jones (2003)
  • "Clocks" by Coldplay (Guy Berryman, Jon Buckland, Will Champion, Phil Harvey, Donald glover this is america meaning Martin) (2004)
  • "Here We Go Again" by Ray Charles & Norah Jones (2005)
  • "Boulevard of Broken Dreams" by Green Day (Billie Joe Armstrong, Mike Dirnt, Frank Edwin Wright III) (2006)
  • "Not Ready to Make Nice" by Dixie Chicks (Martie Maguire, Natalie Maines, Emily Robison) (2007)
  • "Rehab" by Amy Winehouse (2008)
  • "Please Read the Letter" by Alison Krauss & Robert Plant (2009)
  • "Use Somebody" by Kings of Leon (Caleb Followill, Jared Followill, Matthew Followill, Nathan Followill) (2010)
  • "Need You Now" by Lady Antebellum (Hillary Scott, Charles Kelley, Dave Haywood) (2011)
  • "Rolling in the Deep" by Adele (2012)
  • "Somebody That I Used to Americas best value inn tahoe city by Gotye featuring Kimbra (2013)
  • "Get Lucky" by Daft Punk (Thomas Bangalter, Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo) featuring Pharrell Williams & Nile Rodgers (2014)
  • "Stay with Me" (Darkchild version) by Sam Smith (2015)
  • "Uptown Funk" by Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars (2016)
  • "Hello" by Adele (2017)
  • "24K Magic" by Bruno Mars (2018)
  • "This Is America" by Childish Gambino (2019)
  • "Bad Guy" by Billie Eilish (2020)
2021−present

Grammy Award for Song of the Year

1959−1980
1981−2000
2001−2020
  • "Beautiful Day" – Adam Clayton, David Evans, Laurence Mullen & Paul Hewson (songwriters) (2001)
  • "Fallin'" – Alicia Keys (songwriter) (2002)
  • "Don't Know Why" – Jesse Harris (songwriter) (2003)
  • "Dance with My Father" – Richard Marx & Luther Vandross (songwriters) (2004)
  • "Daughters" – John Mayer (songwriter) (2005)
  • "Sometimes You Can't Make It on Your Own" – Adam Clayton, David Evans, Laurence Mullen & Paul Hewson (songwriters) (2006)
  • "Not Ready to Make Nice" – Emily Burns Erwin, Martha Maguire, Natalie Maines Pasdar & Dan Wilson (songwriters) (2007)
  • "Rehab" – Amy Winehouse (songwriter) (2008)
  • "Viva la Vida" – Guy Berryman, Jonathan Buckland, William Champion & Christopher Martin (songwriters) (2009)
  • "Single Ladies (Put a Ring on It)" – Thaddis "Kuk" Harrell, Beyoncé Knowles, Terius Nash & Christopher Stewart (songwriters) (2010)
  • "Need You Now" – Dave Haywood, Josh Kear, Charles Kelley & Hillary Scott (songwriters) (2011)
  • "Rolling in the Deep" – Adele Adkins & Paul Epworth (songwriters) (2012)
  • "We Are Young" – Jack Antonoff, Jeff Bhasker, Andrew Dost & Nate Ruess (songwriters) (2013)
  • "Royals" – Joel Little & Ella Yelich O'Connor (songwriters) (2014)
  • "Stay with Me" (Darkchild version) – James Napier, William Phillips & Sam Smith (songwriters) (2015)
  • "Thinking Out Loud" – Ed Sheeran & Amy Wadge (songwriters) (2016)
  • "Hello" – Adele Adkins & Greg Kurstin (songwriters) (2017)
  • "That's What I Like" – Christopher Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy, Philip Lawrence, Bruno Mars, Ray Charles McCullough II, Donald glover this is america meaning Reeves, Ray Romulus & Jonathan Yip (songwriters) (2018)
  • "This Is America" – Donald Glover, Ludwig Göransson & Jeffery Lamar Williams (songwriters) (2019)
  • "Bad Guy" – Billie Eilish O'Connell & Finneas O'Connell (songwriters) (2020)
2021−present
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Is_America_(song)

Unless your internet had cut out, there is no way you could have missed Childish Gambino’s new music video. The American jack of all trades dropped the controversial This Is America on Saturday Night Live this past Saturday, and not only is the view count on YouTube already at a staggering 63 million, but it seems like it’s the hot topic of the week all over the western world! Fans, music critics, and artists are all going to town with analyses of the music video.

Much has already been said about this new release, well, every frame has been analysed. But what surprises me is that almost nobody seems to have listened to the track properly! And it’s just as interesting* as the video…

Childish who?

Who is the man behind this maelstrom of protest? I’d never heard of Childish Gambino until the Grammy Awards this past January. That evening he received 5 (!) nominations and won one Grammy. From that point, I m 2 ssd 128gb convinced that he was definitely someone to keep my eyes (and ears) on.

Donald Glover a.k.a. Childish Gambino is an actor, writer, producer, comedian, and musician. He got his break with a role in the comedy series Community but stopped acting in 2012 to focus on his musical career under the pseudonym Childish Gambino. (If you’re wondering how he came up with this name, look no further! Glover donald glover this is america meaning the Wu-Tang Name Generator 😅).

His first two albums were widely disparaged by critics, after which he removed himself from the public eye. He did, however, remain active on social media, which did little good for his reputation. According to de Volkskrant this turned him into ‘the symbol of a soft and spoiled generation, the poster child of pathetic millenials’.

But he came back! Glover wrote and produced the series Atlanta and also played the starring role. This dramedy is about two rappers who are trying to make it in Atlanta, Georgia. During the series, many issues are touched on; the issue of race, relationships, poverty, status, and parenting. These aren’t street kids, but they also aren’t members of the glamourous elite. They are ‘normal’ Americans, and as a viewer you get to witness all of their everyday struggles.

The first season came out in 2016 and marked a definitive turning point for Gambino’s reputation. Atlanta was well-received by both his fans and his detractors. His album Awaken, My Love!, which was released the previous December, suddenly seemed fashionable- even amongst the same critics who had previously skewered him.

Taking the events of this week into account, this may well be the ultimate story of the underdog that rises above himself.

This Is America

Back to This Is America. What is it about? We are going to unravel its messages bit by bit.

The song opens with a gospel choir. At this point, the lyrics aren’t especially defined, but the fact that traditional African American music is used makes for a clear context.

Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Yeah, yeah, yeah, go, go away

‘Gospel’ comes from the old English goð (good) spell (news, message), so it literally means ‘good news’. Its roots lie in the cotton fields of the American South during the era of slavery. Religious music carries hopeful messages and has helped ethnic is ikea stoughton open today cope with the challenges of life for many centuries.

Jim Crow

This is followed by a cheerful sounding bridge in which Gambino describes his desires; parties, money, dancing. Not too out there for the average American Millenial.

We just wanna party
Party just for you
We just want the money
Money just for you
I know you wanna party
Party just for me
Girl, you got me dancin’ (yeah, girl, you got me dancin’)
Dance and shake the frame

In the video, we see Gambino dancing in a large, empty warehouse – representing the United States. At the end of the bridge, Gambino’s innocent dancing makes way for something much more shocking and sinister. He shoots a man in the head.

The pose that he adopts during the shooting is a reference to Jim Crow. Jim Crow is a racist caricature of an African American man; a slave that was the subject of a popular first united bank mortgage payment from the 1830s.

Childish Gambino neemt dezelfde pose aan als Jim Crow in This Is America - Nolala

Guns vs. bodies

Perhaps even more shocking than this scene is the fact that the weapon with which Gambino shoots the man is treated with more respect than the corpse.

Whilst the pistol is wrapped carefully in a silk cloth and carried away by a child, the corpse is disrespectfully dragged away.

Corrupt police, weapon ownership

In response to this, Gambino asks himself the question: ‘What is America?’ He describes it as follows:

This is America
Don’t catch you slippin’ up
Don’t catch you slippin’ up
Look what I’m whippin’ up

He makes it very clear in the chorus that you shouldn’t get caught when you slip up.

This is America (skrrt, skrrt, woo)
Don’t catch you slippin’ up (ayy)
Look at how I’m livin’ now
Police be trippin’ now
(woo)

The policeforce in the United States is known to be racist, and studies show that black men between the ages of 15 and 34 are a staggering 9 times more likely to be killed by the police than other Americans.

Yeah, this is America (woo, ayy)
Guns in my area (word, my area)
I got the strap (ayy, ayy)
I gotta carry ’em

Yeah, yeah, I’ma go into this (ugh)

I’m sure I don’t need to go into great detail about the fact that gun ownership is a very hot topic in the United States. Just this week, President Trump came under fire for his speech in support of the pro-gun lobbyists of the NRA.

Not only did he give a nauseatingly vivid description (‘Boom, come here! Boom, come here!) of the attacks on the Bataclan, but he also claimed that this bloodbath could have been prevented if the staff and audience at the show would have been armed. So…

Guerilla vs. gorilla

With Trumps gun policies in the back of one’s mind, the following line really falls into place:

Yeah, yeah, this is guerilla (woo)

Whilst it may seem obvious to interpret this as a reference to guerrilla warfare, there is also a theory which links this line to the Invisible Gorilla-experiment.

In this psychological study, test subjects see a video in which two teams of three players pass a basketball amongst themselves. Halfway through the experiment, a gorilla walks across the screen, even taking the time to vigorously beat his own chest. Guess what? Half of the test subjects who watched the video didn’t notice the gorilla at all! This experiment proved irrefutably that human beings are capable of missing something extremely obvious, even if it is right in front of you.

On one hand, this connection seems a bit spurious, but if you pay attention to the overarching theme of the song and music video, it’s actually spot on!

Meaningless rap

There has been much discussion about the following lines:

Yeah, yeah, I’ma go get the bag
Yeah, yeah, or I’ma get the pad

Perhaps ‘the bag’ could be a reference to a bag of coke or weed, and ‘the pad’ could refer to owning a house.

Or maybe it means that if Gambino doesn’t get a ‘bag’ of money, that he will have to grab his ‘pad’ – notepad, that is- in order to keep writing and earning his pay.

Whatever the case, it seems to be critical of the current rap scene, which many think lacks substance, with lyrics often only being about parties and money.

Yeah, yeah, I’m so cold like, yeah (yeah)
I’m so dope like, yeah (woo)
We gon’ blow like yeah (straight up, uh)

Charleston

After this, we once again see a gospel choir singing the following:

Ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh, tell somebody
You go tell somebody
Grandma told me
Get your money, Black man
(get your money)
Get your money, Black man (get your—Black man)

I believe that this refers to the widespread belief in African American communities that young men must do whatever it takes to become financially successful in order to gain respect. The fact that this advice comes from his grandma seems to point to the fact that he believes this to be an antiquated way of looking at things.

In the music video, Gambino then shoots the entire gospel choir dead, which seems to be a reference to the 2015 mass shooting in the Charleston Church, South Carolina.

Childish Gambino schiet een gospelkoor neer in This Is America

Watch it!

After the chorus comes a second verse in which Gambino criticises superficial, consumerist society.

Look how I’m geekin’ out (hey)
I’m so fitted (I’m so fitted, woo)
I’m on Gucci (I’m on Gucci)
I’m so pretty (yeah, yeah)
I’m gon’ get it (ayy, I’m gon’ get it)
Watch me move (blaow)

Gambino’s impressive dance moves in the music video make it extremely easy to miss what’s happening in the background: a riot breaks out and a man takes his own life.

Je moet goed opletten om alle betekenis uit de This Is America van Childish Gambino te halen

This chaos is filmed on the onlookers’ cell phones.

This a celly (ha)
That’s a tool (yeah)
On my Kodak (woo, Black)

Ooh, know that (yeah, know that, hold on)
Get it (get it, get it)
Ooh, work it (21)

Here, a ‘tool’ is slang for a weapon. With this line, Gambino is likely making a reference to the police officers who shot 22 year old Stephon Clark dead in his own back yard. They thought that he was carrying a weapon, when in reality it was only his cell phone.

At the same time, this points out the many instances where cell phones have been used to film or even live stream at police shootouts and riots, raising questions about violence against African Americans in general.

A play on words, Kodak is probably not only a nod towards the camera company, but also to rapper Kodak Black, whose music Gambino used in Atlanta.

Blocka

A man in a balaclava then gallops by on a white, or rather ashen, horse. Could this be the horse in Revelations 6 from the Bible?

‘I looked, and behold, an ashen horse; and he who sat on it had the name Death; and Hades was following with him.’

Gambino sings the following lyrics:

Hunnid bands, hunnid bands, hunnid bands (hunnid bands)
Contraband, contraband, contraband (contraband)
I got the plug in Oaxaca (woah)
They gonna find you like blocka (blaow)

A ‘band’ is a thousand dollars, so ‘hunnid bands’ equals $100,000. ‘Contraband’ is smuggled goods, often drugs. Oaxaca is a Mexican state which is infamous for its many drug cartels. A plug is a dealer and ‘blocka’ is an onomatopoeic word representing the sound of a gunshot.

Gambino also makes the universally recognisable is ginger ale good for you sign with his hands, and on that sign all of the dancers around him disappear. A long, icy, terrifying (!) silence follows, but in the end it turns out he’s only reaching for a joint from his pocket.

Social Media Bash

In the next shot, Gambino is dancing on a car. Whilst the newest and most expensive models are usually used in hip hop videos, this is an old pile of junk.

The chorus is prefaced by the following lyrics:

Ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh-ooh, tell somebody
America, I just checked my following list, and—
You go tell somebody
—you mothafuckas owe me

Rapper Young Thug – who has 2.7 million Twitter followers and 5 million Instagram followers – complains in these lyrics that that’s not enough for him.

Outro

Young Thug also takes care of the outro. It doesn’t matter how successful or rich an African American man is in America, he will still be ‘just a black man’. Racism is (still) the norm in today’s America.

You just a Black man in this world
You just a barcode, ayy
You just a Black man in this donald glover this is america meaning Drivin’ expensive foreigns, ayy

He even compares his position with that of a dog:

You just a donald glover this is america meaning dawg, yeah
I kenneled him in the backyard
No probably ain’t life to a dog
For a big dog
This Is America – Childish Gambino

At the end of the video, we see Gambino running from the police. Even though he seemingly gets away with several shootings, he is persecuted for smoking a joint.

Gambino’s message

So what exactly is the message that Gambino is trying to get across with This Is America? I think that he wants one united bank reviews 2016 to know that we shouldn’t be distracted by superficial entertainment, the trivial aspects of current (popular) culture – parties, money, social media.

He holds a mirror in front of us to open our eyes to the real problems facing American society – racism, violence and gun possession.

What do you think?

It’s clear that Gambino’s message has now been heard worldwide. It has been generally well received; artists are hailing him as a ‘genius’ and according to some fans he is a better version of Kanye West.

However, some people have called This Is America‘evil garbage’. They say the symbolism is ‘too basic’, that the song is cheap propaganda for the removal of the second amendment (the right to bear arms), claiming that that the lyrics are simply meaningless. What do you think? Let us know in the comments!

Want to read more?

Looking for more razor sharp commentary about American society? Kendrick Lamar and The Carters also have claim to commentary fame.

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*Disclaimer: The interpretation of lyrics is thankfully up for discussion and there are many very different (!) theories, so I am under no illusions that my opinions are gospel. My analysis is based on several articles (the links to which are below) as well as the discussion that has taken place about this song on Genius. If my interpretation has offered even a little bit of clarity or provided any food for thought, then I’ve achieved my goal. Do you have other ideas about the meaning of this song? Let me know!


– This Is America is written by Donald Glover / Ludwig Goransson © Kobalt Music Publishing Ltd., Warner/Chappell Music, Inc, 2018.
📸: Screenshot from music video.
Источник: https://www.nolala.com/en/current/an-analysis-of-the-meaning-of-the-lyrics-and-official-music-video-of-childish-gambino-this-is-america/

Why is Donald Glover shirtless in this is America?

Why is Donald Glover shirtless in this is America?

He’s shirtless for a reason. Glover’s exposed torso is there to remind us that he is black and vulnerable, according to Yahoo’s Ken Tucker.

Why the dancing makes this is America so uncomfortable to watch?

Why The Dancing In Childish Gambino’s ‘This Is America’ Is So Uncomfortable To Watch. It’s our own kinesthetic empathy – the action of mirror neurons in the brain that makes us want to move along as we see someone else dance. “An internal struggle begins in the viewer’s body, which is pulled between joy and horror.

What does the white horse in this is America mean?

In the Bible, Revelations 6:8 (KJV) reads: “And I looked, and behold a pale horse: and the name that sat on him was Death, and Hell followed with him.” According to the scripture, the appearance of four horsemen signifies the oncoming apocalypse – with death represented by the final, white one.

What do the old cars symbolize in this is America?

People on social media have largely drawn two conclusions, the first being that the empty cars represent the news stories of black men killed by police during traffic stops. The second, is that the empty and abandoned cars could represent the stalled economic mobility of many black Americans.

Why does Childish Gambino dance like that?

In the layered messaging of the video, the dancing has been seen as a distraction from the violence and disturbing symbolism all around Glover’s musical alter-ego Childish Gambino. “There are a lot of dark themes in it, so they wanted us to be the light of the video,” Silver told Pigeons and Planes.

Why is it called Childish Gambino?

Donald Glover confirmed in an interview with Fuse that his name came from The Wu-Tang Name Generator, he even spoke to RZA about it. The Wu-Tang Name Generator is a fun computer name app that creates you a rap name based on your real name. Donald entered his name into the generator and thus, Childish Gambino was born.

Why is dance so important in Africa?

In Africa, as with other parts of the world, ceremonial dance tells a story. More than mere entertainment, it recounts history, conveys emotion, celebrates rites of passage, and helps to unify communities. “African dance” is usually associated with sub-Saharan and Western Africa.

Who are the dancers in this is America?

Two of the four young dancers are Bakersfield siblings Trinity and Devin Penn, who were cast as dancers in Gambino’s music video and recent “Saturday Night Live” performance.

Who is the girl in this is America?

Nicole Arbour

Who is will in this is America?

The song features background vocals by American rappers Young Thug (who also has writing credit as Williams), Slim Jxmmi of Rae Sremmurd, BlocBoy JB, Quavo of Migos, and 21 Savage.

What is Childish Gambino’s real name?

Donald McKinley Glover

What do the numbers mean Childish Gambino?

The album, entitled “3.15. 20,” was officially released Sunday, March 22, but was named after the date it was dropped on a dedicated website before being pulled. Time is a concept woven into the album: Most of the songs have numbers in the title, which represent their time stamp on the album.

Is Childish Gambino R&B?

“Awaken, My Love!” is the third studio album by American rapper Donald Glover, under his stage name Childish Gambino. Consisting of tracks being sung rather than rapped, its fusion of psychedelic soul, funk and R&B influences was considered a bold departure from the predominantly hip hop style of his prior work.

What was Childish Gambino’s last album on 3.15 20?

Many of us have feared the day Donald Glover, also known as Childish Gambino, would release his final album. Gambino’s musical persona has pushed boundaries in the music industry for 15 years, and while “3.15.20” is his final creation, its many layers will keep the album compelling for years to come.

What is the meaning of 3.15 20?

what we thought was strong is weak

Who produces for Childish Gambino?

Ludwig Göransson

Is Childish Gambino making more music?

20 in March via a website, but on Friday he broke his social media silence to tweet an announcement of a new “music project.” He’s pretty excited about it: “last music project was probably my best,” he said of 3.15. 20, “but the one coming will be my biggest by far.” last music project was probably my best.

Is human sacrifice on Childish Gambino’s new album?

The album also features artists Ariana Grande, SZA and 21 Savage. Interestingly, the songs “Saturday” and “Human Sacrifice” were omitted from the track list. Glover has been adamant over the past several years that he will retire the Gambino moniker after the release of his next studio album.

Who is on Childish Gambino’s album?

20′ consists of mostly new music, and features collaborators including Ariana Grande, 21 Savage and Ludwig Göransson. Glover’s 2019 single ‘Algorhythm’, which he shared via an augmented reality app, also features. The music that was initially released last weekend included Gambino’s 2018 single ‘Feels Like Summer’.

Who is featured on Childish Gambino’s album?

Childish Gambino’s New Album Features Ariana Grande And 21 Savage — And Fans Are Loving It. Donald Glover’s peculiar countdown on donaldgloverpresents.com expired on March 22 and with the strike of zero came the release of walmart fortnite toys Childish Gambino make another album?

Donald Glover details next Childish Gambino album to come, alludes to ensuing ‘Atlanta’ seasons. The impending project will follow Glover’s most recent release as Childish Gambino, 3.15. 20, which arrived in March.

Does Childish Gambino still rap?

But this is his first album-length release since 2016’s Awaken My Love—and it could be his last. He’s long promised to retire his Childish Gambino alter ego, and has said that this would be his final album. ‘” he told HuffPost in 2016 about his decision to end his music career.

Is Childish Gambino retiring?

Glover announced on Saturday at Governor’s Ball Music Festival in New York City that his next album will be his last album. “I’ll see you for the last Gambino album,” he boone county wv at the end of his performance.

How much is Donald Glover worth?

Donald Glover is a true multihyphenate, gaining fame as both a musician and actor. The “Atlanta” creator and star — also known as Childish Gambino — has racked up a net worth of $35 million through his numerous talents, according to Celebrity Net Worth. Here’s a quick look at Glover’s stats: Net worth: $35 million.

16/08/2019Manon WilcoxFAQ

Источник: https://colors-newyork.com/why-is-donald-glover-shirtless-in-this-is-america/

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Hidden Meanings Behind Childish Gambino's 'This Is America' Video Explained

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