pokemon cards worth any money

These kiss cards make the most money, especially if you have a An auto usually sells for about the same price as any other sets of. Mark Shininger is selling off his grade school Pokemon cards for thousands “I kept them because I thought one day these might be worth. On opening the sealed box, the YouTuber was stunned to find that the Pokémon cards were counterfeit. Fortunately, the money was yet to be.

: Pokemon cards worth any money

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The 'insane' money in trading collectible cards

By JohnJo Devlin
Business reporter, BBC News

Image source, SuperDuperDani

"It's hard to put a value on it. but I would say my collection is worth around a quarter of a million dollars."

Dani Sanchez, known to her fans as SuperDuperDani, is showing me two first-edition Charizard cards. She's a Pokémon YouTuber in Los Angeles, and every week thousands of people watch her unbox multi-packs of these colourful collectibles.

To many millennials, the first Pokémon craze of the late 90s and early 2000s is a defining part of their youth. Pictures of these Japanese anime monsters were traded in schools across the world and what started as a video game ended up appearing in movies, Happy Meals and cereal boxes.

For Dani, a childhood interest in Pokémon turned into a 15-year long collecting obsession, and eventually a career. Pokémon cards have seen an unprecedented rise in interest over the last 18 months, she says.

"Vintage cards have skyrocketed in value. A sealed box of Pokémon cards from the early 2000s or late 90s retailed at around $100. [That same box would cost] $20,000, $30,000 or even $50,000 (£35,000) today. It's insane."

Image source, SuperDuperDani

As with other stay-at-home hobbies, demand for Pokémon cards increased when coronavirus pokemon cards worth any money. But Dani says the pandemic isn't the only apple ipad pro 1st generation case why these collectibles have made a comeback.

"Celebrities [have been] getting involved in it. Logic bought a Pokémon card, Logan Paul got in, Shawn Mendes, Steve Aoki. But there's another side: the financial angle. There's a whole group of people out there pushing the market up in the hope of making a profit later," she says.

And profit they have. Auction site eBay says sales of Pokémon cards in the US shot up 574% between 2019 and 2020.

But that's just the tip of the iceberg. In the same year, trade in football cards grew by a staggering 1,586%.

Across all types of cards, sales in Europe have more than doubled, and in the UK they've tripled.

The most valuable cards sell for hundreds of thousands of pounds. But physical cards have new competition for the hearts of collectors.

NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, are digital tokens - you can think of them as certificates of ownership for virtual or physical assets.

Typically, for a video clip, an image or a gif, the ownership of an NFT can be traced and verified.

In the world of sports memorabilia, an NFT might be a highlight.

For example, in the US, basketball highlights are being made into NFTs known as Moments by NBA Top Shot, a joint venture between the National Basketball Association, the NBA Players Association and Dapper Labs.

If you want to see Zion Williamson make a hard-hitting block, you could head to YouTube.

But if you want to pokemon cards worth any money one of his plays, in a way that no one else can, the league might just sell it to you for tens of thousands of dollars.

Image source, Yodough/BrownBearVisuals

Jesse Schwarz, the founder of Front Page, set a Top Shot record when he spent $208,000 on a LeBron James dunk. He says that the fact people can view or copy his NFT doesn't bother him. In fact, he's happy it's out there.

"Everyone knows there's one Mona Lisa. You can print out a picture of it, someone can paint you pokemon cards worth any money fake one. But there's only ever one," he argues.

"When people are using the Mona Lisa, whether in a meme or a postcard, that just increases the value [of the original] because it popularises the image. It's the same thing here. The more people that watch this highlight the better. Everyone pokemon cards worth any money see that I own this highlight," Jesse adds.

While the prices of some NFTs have soared, they should not be treated as an investment, according to Dr William Quinn, a lecturer in finance at Queen's University Belfast, and the co-author of Boom And Bust: A Global History of Financial Bubbles.

"As an investment there's nothing particularly appealing about them, apart from perhaps, the belief that you can sell them along to someone else for a higher price - which is the essence of a bubble," he says.

NBA Top Shot isn't the only firm capitalising on sports NFTs.

Image source, Felix Roumagnac

In France, the company Sorare is digitising football cards and has partnered with more than 125 clubs including Liverpool, Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich.

You can spend eye-watering amounts on individual cards. A Cristiano Ronaldo card recently sold for more than €83,000 (£71,000; $99,000), although most cost far less.

Beyond their value as an asset, these cards can be used as part of a game. Sorare has developed a fantasy football league, in which owners compete for prizes.

Grant Anderson, who goes by the nickname Hibee, found the concept so engaging that he decided to start The Sorare Podcast, and now acts as a UK ambassador for the company. He has fond memories of trading football cards as a child but says the social side of collecting was lost along the way.

"I don't think that really exists in the eBay trading world. You spend a couple of hundred dollars and get sent a brown envelope [of cards]."

And he's not the only fan to get involved.

In the space of a year, sales of Sorare collectibles have increased from $50,000 a month to around $6.5m.

The head of Sorare, Nicolas Julia, says that the sky's the limit for NFTs. But that doesn't mean that traditional cards will die out completely.

"They're going to co-exist. Some people value having something tangible. But at the same time, there's a lot of demand for owning something digital, scarce and secure too," Nicolas said,

Hibee won't be going back. For him, the social and gaming elements of digital collecting are a big pokemon cards worth any money on traditional cards.

But experts from eBay reckon 2021 will be another great year for physical collectibles. They've even said that nostalgia for more normal times may boost the prices of rare ticket stubs beyond six figures.

As for Dani Sanchez, she will be sticking to her physical cards.

"None of my friends that are also into collecting dabble in NFTs. In my eyes it's more of an investment for someone who's into business. It seems like it's driven by money, rather than collection itself."

Источник: https://www.bbc.com/news/business-56413186

As my partner and I were preparing to move in together, earlier this spring, she pulled out a box of Pokémon cards she had held on to since she was a kid in the ’90s.

“Want to see if these are worth anything?” she asked me offhandedly.

We’d heard that Pokémon was making a comeback. Vintage Charizard cards were going for thousands of dollars: last year, YouTuber Logan Paul bought one for $150,000 while rapper Logic reportedly paid $220,574 for the same version (all figures US).

I took out the stack of a few dozen cards, stored all these years in a decoupage tin and mixed with other tokens of the era—buttons and pieces of cardboard bearing Sailor Mercury’s likeness—and, one by one, started to search for them on pricing websites.

The first few queries yielded expected results for pokemon cards worth any money childhood relics: $5 here, $7 there. Then I picked up one card featuring a holographic image of the turtle-like Blastoise. This little monster was among the most iconic Pokémon—the final evolution of one of the three starters players can choose from in the classic Game Boy game. If any of the cards was going to be worth something, it was this one.

I typed its name and number into the search bar, and when the results appeared, I dropped the card in shock. Of the first five listings that appeared for the Blastoise, the lowest was a cool $820. And if we had the coveted first-edition version? A professionally graded mint-quality copy was going for nearly $50,000.

A quick glance at its price history showed me that this piece of shiny cardboard that my girlfriend had ferried around from crappy apartment to crappy apartment was not only pricey but, thanks to a global pandemic that had renewed interest in collectible cards, more valuable than ever.

Pokémon may forever be associated with the schoolyards of the ’90s, but trading cards have been around for much longer. In the late nineteenth century, the original “trade cards” were inserted into the backs of cigarette packs and functioned as both advertisements for businesses or products and stiffeners for extra protection. Since they often featured amusing cartoon-like images, people began collecting them in scrapbooks. Sports cards—mainly for baseball—quickly followed suit.

Trading-card games, however, are a relatively new phenomenon. In 1991, mathematician Richard Garfield was challenged by his friend, Wizards of the Coast founder Peter Adkison, to combine the popularity of baseball cards with a board game. The idea was for players to accumulate a collection of various cards to build a deck and play with. Two years later, Garfield launched Magic: The Gathering—widely recognized as the first trading-card game—which quickly sold out after its first run and spawned the creation of other beloved games, including Pokémon and Yu-Gi-Oh, in the late ’90s.

People of all ages still play these tabletop games, but a blossoming secondary collectors’ market has emerged, particularly for the acquisition of rare vintage cards from the original print runs.

Last year, eBay reported that there were over 4 million more trading cards sold on the platform than in 2019, with Pokémon sales increasing by 574 percent. Outside of eBay, professional auction sites are pulling in record sales of vintage sports and trading cards nearly every month. At one of those auctions this June, an autographed Tom Brady rookie card was listed for $750,000 and, after a manic thirty-two-bid war, was eventually sold to an anonymous buyer for over $3.1 million—a price some might consider a steal compared with the NBA and MLB cards that sold over the past year for $5.2 million each.

The collector frenzy isn’t just happening online. While other brick-and-mortar retailers suffered under the weight of COVID-19—the Canadian Federation of Independent Business estimates that one in six small businesses could close due to the pandemic—game stores saw their sales surge.

Dylan Kirkup, the e-commerce manager at Toronto’s 401 Games, which buys and resells old trading cards, says sales of products like Pokémon cards doubled and even tripled over the course of 2020. “Other businesses were seeing a lot of the negative effects of the pandemic and these lockdowns,” he says. “We found ourselves on the exact opposite end of that spectrum.”

When my girlfriend purchased her small Pokémon collection as an eight-year-old in 1999, she was more interested in the pretty pictures of her favourite characters than in actually playing the game. But that half-hearted interest—coupled with her hesitation to throw things away—paid off. The same millennials who collected those cards as kids but didn’t hold on to them are now adults with jobs and money to spend, and since social activities, travel, and big-ticket expenses have been largely on pause, it makes sense that some people would invest those excess funds into collectible cardboard.

From some quick internet research, I learned that our high-priced collectible was even more valuable because it was from the first Pokémon card set ever printed, commonly known as the base set. Cards from the first run of that set bear a fancy little “first edition” stamp on the left-hand side, and those are the highest valued, netting auction prices of hundreds of thousands of dollars. This March, a first-edition Charizard broke a record as the most expensive Pokémon card ever sold, racking up $399,750 on Goldin Auctions. Our card was from the second run of that first set—commonly known as “shadowless” because the card’s image box doesn’t have a drop shadow behind it like on later printings. Shadowless cards are not as rare as first-edition cards, but they’re a lot more rare—and expensive—than other cards from the base set.

Zack Browning is an expert in the minute details that make these types of cards so valuable. The Chicago-based card collector boasts one of the most expansive Pokémon collections in the world, which he estimates is worth somewhere between $3 and $5 million and which includes mint-condition versions of nearly every card from the vintage ’90s era. Browning started collecting cards as a kid, when his grandmother would gift him packs. But, when he became an adult, it became a part-time pursuit.

“When I left college, I started making a little bit of money, and I wanted to spend some of it on what I enjoyed as a kid, so I went and bought some Pokémon cards and started building sets,” he says. “It’s developed into this massive pursuit, but that was never initially the goal&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. I’ve helped many, many others follow their passions and find their own childhood collections.”

As it turns out, nostalgia is a valuable commodity. According to research by Le Moyne College psychologist Krystine Batcho, our attraction to the past increases during times of great instability or change—like, say, a global pandemic. She has found that people with greater propensities for nostalgia are better able to cope with adversity and turmoil.

“One of the most important aspects of being a healthy human being is having a sense that you are in control of things,” Batcho said during a 2019 interview with the American Psychological Association. “When things start to change&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. it’s comforting to have a woodforest bank hiring near me feeling for the past that reminds us that, although we don’t know what the future is going to bring, what we do know is that we know who we have been and who we really are.”

While COVID-19 may have spurred the renewed interest in collectibles, Browning predicts that these cards will become even more valuable as the millennials who first drove the craze in the ’90s earn more money to put toward recapturing their schoolyard obsessions. As time passes, he says, people tend to feel more nostalgic for their childhoods—a longing soothed, perhaps, by holding a shadowless Blastoise or a Tom Brady rookie card in their hands. And they’ll always pay a premium for that.

While I was tempted to hold on to the Blastoise in the hope that our descendants could make thousands off it in a few decades, we ultimately decided to sell the card. On a crisp March day in a Vancouver park, I met a man from one of the many Facebook Marketplace groups I joined this year. I’d listed the card for what felt like a reasonable deal considering its slightly roughed-up condition compared with similar ones I saw on eBay, and he ended up offering me around $300 for it.

Between that and the money I made from selling some dozen other cards we’d pulled out of the closet, my girlfriend and I netted enough for a new couch, which in our current life is more useful than being able to relive our pasts.

When I handed off the card in the park, the guy’s eyes lit up. I asked him what he planned to do with it—if he would go to the trouble of professionally grading it to resell to some other collector down the line or keep it long-term for his own nostalgia.

He said he might keep it for his kids to have in twenty years, so they could see what his childhood was like.

Mel Woods

Mel Woods

Mel Woods is a Vancouver-based writer and audio producer, and a staff writer at Xtra Magazine. Their work has appeared in HuffPost Canada, Vice, Slate, The Tyee, and the Globe and Mail.

Mathias Ball

Mathias Ball

Mathias Ball is an illustrator from a little town along the coast of Lake Huron. Their work has appeared in Reader's Digest, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and more.

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Источник: https://thewalrus.ca/gotta-catch-em-all-why-old-pokemon-cards-are-suddenly-worth-thousands/

What Are the 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards?

Money / Wealth

Pokemon Cards

apilarinos / iStock.com

Pokémon, short for pocket monsters, was first introduced in 1996 in Japan. It quickly gained popularity and remains a fan favorite 25 years later. Initially a video game series, the brand now has a show, trading card game and toys.

System for Ranking Pokémon Trading Cards

The Pokémon trading cards quickly became coveted collector’s items, especially for diehard fans. The cards are marked with one of three symbols in the bottom-right corner:

  • Common cards have a black circle
  • Uncommon cards have a black diamond
  • Rare cards have a black star

But the ranking system doesn’t stop there. There are also unique card designs.

Unique Pokémon Card Designs:

  • Holo rare cards that have a shimmery, shiny effect to the image
  • Reverse holo cards are shiny and shimmery everywhere except on the image
  • Ultra-rare cards have the greatest Pokémon characters and are called EX, GX, V, Half Art or Half Body
  • Full Art or Full Body cards have a picture that covers the entire card, with words overlapping the image
  • Each card has a number, but Secret Rare cards have special numbers, like 113/115
  • Rainbow Rare cards are part of Pokémon’s Sun and Moon series
  • Promo cards are exclusively available at Pokémon events

Top 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards

Do you have one of the most expensive Pokémon cards? Do you own any of these and are your cards worth the money? Here’s the list of the 10 highest-selling Pokémon cards.

1. Ex Deoxys Gold Star Holo Rayquaza 107

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $45,100

What makes the card special: Rayquaza is a legendary Pokémon that first surfaced as a character in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for the Game Boy Advance. In 2005, Rayquaza received its own card from an expansion series called Ex Deoxys TCG.

Specifics of the particular sale: The card sold was graded by Professional Sports Association, the largest third-party trading card grading company. PSA rated the card as GEM MINT 10, which is near perfect condition.

2. Ex Dragon Frontiers Gold Star Holo Charizard 100

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $60,065

What makes it special: Charizard is a popular character with many coveted card variations. This particular card was introduced in the same 2005 Ex Deoxys TCG as the No. 10 trading card. This variant is special because the artwork differs from traditional Charizard base cards. Trading card game rules also allow only one pokemon cards worth any money these cards in your deck during a battle, adding to its value.

3. Tropical Mega Battle Tropical Wind Promo Card

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $65,100

What makes it special: This was a trophy card during the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle in Hawaii. The tournament was an invite-only event where players from around the world competed.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

4. 1998 Japanese Promo Card – Tamamushi University Magikarp Trophy

Card sale date: February 2021

Card selling price: $66,100

What makes it special: Another promotional card, this was only awarded during a single 2-day event held in Japan. To enter the competition, people had to complete a test called the “Tamamushi University Hyper Test.” After entries were received, 1,000 participants were selected to participate in the tournament, and those who won a battle got this card.

Magikarp normally can’t learn Dragon Rage, a move it has on this card, but those who scored well on the first rendition of the test were given this Magikarp with Dragon Rage in their Pokémon video game as well.

5. Super-Secret Battle “#1 Trainer” Promotional Holo Card

Card sale date: July 2020

Card selling price: $90,000

What makes it special: Best pokemon cards worth any money show that only seven people were awarded this unique card during a 1999 Japan tournament. Players had to compete and win in regional tournaments to enter the national tournament for a chance at this super-secret battle trainer card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

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6. Neo Genesis First Edition Holo Lugia

Card sale date: May 2021

Card selling price: $144,300

What makes it special: Many people love Lugia cards, since the Pokémon was on the box art for the second generation of Pokémon games. It’s not uncommon for collectors to have one — PWCC, the largest trading card marketplace, says almost 1,300 have been submitted — but only 41 have received a PSA 10 rating. PWCC believes this card may sell for even more in the future.

Specifics of the particular sale: This card received a rating of Pristine 10 from another well-known card grading company, Beckett Grading Services.

7. Japanese Promo Card – Family Event Trophy – Holo Kangaskhan

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $150,100

What makes it special: As one of the rarest cards in the world, it was only given to a handful of winners during an exclusive 1998 Parent/Child Mega Battle tournament in Japan. Families battled against each other, and only the ones that could get a certain number of wins got this card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA has only rated 46 of these cards in total, with only this one receiving a perfect 10.

8. Backless Blastoise Commissioned Presentation Galaxy Star Holo

Card sale date: January 2021

Card selling price: $360,000

What makes it special: In 1998, before Pokémon came to the USA and skyrocketed in popularity, Wizards of the Coast did a test run for some Pokémon cards. This card came from that run, which was never meant for the public and doesn’t have any printing on the back of the card.

9. First Edition Charizard Holo

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $369,000

What makes it special:Another Charizard card, this one is a first edition of the shadowless holo card. This was an early Pokémon design, which means it was simple, without shading behind art and text to make the graphics pop.

Specifics of the particular sale: This particular card is ranked as a Gold Label Pristine 10 by SGC, another card-rating company.

10. 1998 Japanese Promo Card Holo Illustrator Pikachu

Card sale date: pokemon cards worth any money 2021

Card selling price: $375,000

What makes it special: As the most popular and well-known Pokémon character, it’s no surprise that Pikachu tops the list of most valuable Pokémon cards. Only 39 Illustrator Pikachu cards were given out, to the winners of three art competitions conducted by CoroCoro Comic magazine.

Competitors created their own Pokémon art, and winners received this Pikachu card, showing the character drawing two other Pokémon — Charmander and Mew. This artwork was created by Atsuko Nishida, who designed Pikachu for the Game Boy Advance.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card as near mint condition grade seven, which is coded as PSA 7 NRMT.

Expert Advice

A card’s condition has a lot to do with the value. Before you sell your card, or before you pay a lot to buy one, have it examined and verified by a Pokémon trading card expert.

As the most successful media franchise in the world, Pokémon products are in high demand and new rare cards are still being printed. If you can get your hands on one, you may be able to get a hefty profit out of your hobby.

Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

About the Author

Katy Hebebrand is a freelance writer with eight years of experience in the financial industry. She earned her BA from the University of West Florida and her MA from Full Sail University. Since beginning to work full-time as a freelance writer three years ago, she has written on topics spanning many fields, including home building, families and parenting, legal and professional/corporate communications.

Источник: https://www.gobankingrates.com/money/wealth/most-expensive-pokemon-cards/

Your old Pokémon cards are now worth hundreds of dollars

There's been a resurgence of Pokémon card collecting, and Pokémon fans that have long since grown-up into working, money-earning adults are now more than happy to pay a pretty penny to round out their extensive Pokémon card collections.

Of course, just how much your cards are worth depends on what you’ve got.

In 2016 the Pikachu Illustrator Pokémon card sold at a Heritage Auctions sale for pokemon cards worth any money than $54,000, due to its rarity. Only 20 to 39 copies of the card were produced – so if you’re sitting on one – now is the time to sell.

ebay pokemon card listing

eBay

But that isn’t to say some of the more common cards aren’t worth anything.

In an article for The Sun in the UK, collectables expert Tracey Martin said that holographic cards are the most valuable, and cards released between 1999 and 2000 – known as ‘shadowless’ Pokémon  cards – are now highly sought-after.

Average Pokemon cards might only earn you around $10 a piece, while an authenticated card in mint condition, such as the Raichu shadowless holographic cards released in 1999, is worth up to $4000.

A 1999 first edition shadowless charmeleon can be worth up to $500, while a Nidorino shadowless first edition base set card in mint condition could fetch you up to $160. There's even an Australian card collectors site where Pokemon cards can fetch anything from $5 to $800. 

charizard collectable card

Cherry Collectables

But if you don’t have any of those cards in your collection, don’t stress yet. If you happened to be one of the lucky kids who got a first edition base set of Pokémon cards, then the set itself could be worth money too!

 So, what do you do if you own of these rare cards?

  • If the pokemon cards worth any money you have a low level (sitting at the $100 mark) it could be wise to hold on to them for another few years.
  • Keep all your cards in mint condition an in cases.
  • Get them authenticated and rated by the Professional Sports Authenticator.
  • Find out how much you card is worth by researching similar cards sold on eBay and other collector sites.
  • Check things such as print and release dates, condition, and whether or not you still have the original packaging.

You might also like:

Your old Cabbage Patch doll could be worth thousands of dollars 

Your Harry Potter books could be worth thousands of dollars 

These '90s toys are now worth hundreds of dollars 

Источник: https://www.bhg.com.au/your-old-pokemon-cards-are-now-worth-hundreds-of-dollars

How to Determine the Value of Your Old Pokémon Cards

Your friendly neighborhood slacker. Chill Clinton likes to write about film, music, collectibles, and more.

Is My Old Pokémon Card Collection Worth Anything?

So you've rediscovered your old Pokémon cards. But how do you know if you've struck gold or struck out with them? Below is some advice on determining your collection's value, based on my experience appraising and buying old card collections.

  1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From
  2. Check the Condition of Your Cards
  3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From

For the purpose of this article, I will largely focus on cards produced by Wizards of the Coast from 1998–2003. These are the classic "vintage" Pokémon cards that many of us in our mid-twenties to mid-thirties remember collecting as children, and they're the ones adults commonly find when they go digging for their old binder of cards.

This is not to say that Pokémon cards produced after this time period don't have comparable value, but I would need the length of a book to write a guide that would encompass the entire Pokémon trading card ecosystem.

Knowing what era of cards you have is an important first step. Below, you can find all of the set symbols from vintage-era Pokémon sets, which you can use to identify which sets your cards belong to.

2. Check the Condition of Your Cards

As someone who regularly purchases large collections, often from people who discovered them after a decade or more of misplacement, I find that people have a difficult time accepting that their ten-year-old selves did not do a great job of preserving the condition of their cards.

Signs of Wear to Watch For

Collectors are extremely detail-oriented. Cards that exhibit creases, scratches on the holographic image, or any visible whitening on the corners are generally not highly valued.

Cards that display signs of any mishandling or improper storage will not be very valuable. Even minor damage can bring down a card's value to just a fraction of the "market values" displayed on many websites. And collectors are as concerned with the front of the card as they are with the back, where oftentimes it is easiest to see signs of wear.

Below I've included an image of a condition I commonly find when appraising childhood collections. If your cards show signs of wear similar to the ones below, they will have to be exceptionally rare to hold significant value.

3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

Even if your collection isn't in the best condition, you might still have a hidden gem, that collectors will take significant interest in. Naturally, your Base Set 2 Mr. Mimes and Jungle Kangaskhans will not be worth the toil of finding an interested buyer if they aren't in impeccable condition, but pokemon cards worth any money isn't the case for all cards.

Below, I've included a quick list of things to look out for when determining which of your cards are most likely to return value.

1st Edition

A designation unique to the Wizards of the Coast era of Pokémon cards, indicating that the card was produced during the first distribution cycle of the set. These cards, especially those from Base Set, have a significantly lower population, and are therefore more widely sought, bringing in significantly higher sale prices than their reprints. You can see the 1st edition stamp beside the bottom left corner of the illustration frame.

Shadowless

You may have heard this term in reference to high-priced Charizard cards, but did you know that all Base Set cards have a "shadowless" printing? This label is applied to cards produced during the second distribution cycle of Base Set. During this printing, the cards no longer had the 1st edition stamp, but still lacked the drop shadow beside the right side of the frame, which would become a persistent design feature in subsequent vintage Pokémon sets. See the example below.

Charizards

Unless your card looks like you saved it as it was going through the wood chipper, nearly any Charizard card printed from 1998–2003 will have some degree of collector interest. Of course, the value of these Charizards depends heavily on their printing and condition, but this icon of the vintage Pokémon era is typically able to return some value, regardless of whether you have a Base Set 2 Charizard, Blaine's Charizard, or a Shining Charizard.

Shining Pokémon

During the Neo series, from 2000 to 2001, Pokémon introduced one of the most iconic series of variant Pokémon called "Shining." The "Shining Collection" consists of twenty cards available through packs, and one card available as a promo. Regardless of condition, these cards tend to evoke interest from collectors for their extremely low population, and unique printing style, featuring textured gold accents on the illustration.

Southern Island Cards

This was a special mini-set of cards released in 2001 lexus rx 350 f sport 2020 promote the second Pokémon movie. This set was distributed through two different promotional folders, each holding each halves of a complete 18 card set. Though not all of these promos are widely sought, complete sets of these cards can go for hundreds of dollars.

How to Appraise and Sell Your Collection

Once you take some time to learn about the cards that you have and what their potential value might be, you might find it's time to sell.

If you are not an experienced trading card reseller, I would highly discourage you from selling cards directly to consumers. There are many risks that come into play when selling cards online, including inaccurate listings, condition disputes, and the possibility of unintentionally selling fake cards, which might be hard to spot without the knowledge and experience to authenticate cards yourself.

Selling cards online also requires a significant time commitment, shipping and packaging costs, and listing fees that might leave you feeling discouraged if you don't have the process and infrastructure needed to mitigate these factors.

Working With a Local Dealer

I would recommend selling your collection to a dealer in your area. These folks dedicate a significant portion of their time to buying and reselling Pokémon cards on a professional or semi-professional level, and they may be interested in acquiring your collection.

However, it's important to understand that the dealer's motivation is to resell your cards at a profit, so they will often offer about half the market value of your cards, considering the condition of your collection. But consider this as a convenience fee for selling your cards without having to seek out and render service to dozens or hundreds of buyers.

There are a ton of hidden costs and hours of labor behind the market values you see on popular websites. Even if your cards are in impeccable condition, if you approach a dealer, understand that they need to compensate themselves for the labor of selling the cards despite the costs inherent to selling, and those considerations will impact how much they are able to offer you.

Estimate the Value of Your Cards Before Negotiating With the Dealer

By simply understanding the rough value of your cards before meeting with a dealer, and understanding their motivations and limitations, you can manage your expectations and negotiate with dealers more effectively, to ensure you're getting the best value possible.

Best of luck, and happy hunting for your old collection!

Источник: https://hobbylark.com

10 of the Most Valuable Pokémon Cards

As a teenager, Pokémon creator Satoshi Tajiri was so fond of collecting insects that classmates called him “Mr. Bug.” While it might not have been an affectionate label, Tajiri had the last laugh: His Pokémon video game, originally released for the Nintendo Game Boy in 1996, has become an enduring multimedia success, selling billions in games, merchandise, and phone apps.

The goal of collecting and pitting monsters against one another has been particularly appealing for trading card collectors, who have created an entire secondary market for the low-tech version of the game. The all-time sales record as of May 2021 might be this Blastoise card sold at auction for a whopping $360,000, but it's not a card you ever would have found in a pack. Wizards of the Coast, which manufactures the card game, printed just one to show to Nintendo.

Fortunately, other cards are a little more accessible, though first editions, misprints, and other characteristics all affect value. If you’re curious, take a look at 10 of the most valuable Pokémon cards according to Heritage Auctions, eBay, and other sources.

1. Pikachu Illustrator // $250,000

One of the earliest cards to come out of the Pokémon franchise was this promotional card of Pikachu that was given out to winners of an illustration contest in 1998. An estimated 20 to 39 copies were issued. In late 2016, Heritage Auctions sold one for a whopping $54,970. In July 2020, a card graded by Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) as a 9 out of 10 fetched $250,000.

2. Shadowless Holo Charizard // $507,000

This dragon-esque creature was first seen in 1999. More than 20 years later, a PSA 10 card sold for a whopping $507,000 on eBay.

3. Master's Key Prize Card // $22,000

Given out during a 2010 card championship in Japan, only 34 copies of the Master's Key Prize Card are thought to exist. The scarcity helps the cards command a high price when they hit the market. One ungraded card sold for $22,000 in November 2019.

4. Pre-Release Raichu // $10,000

Collectors love cards that were never intended for public distribution, and this Raichu card fits the bill. Although unconfirmed, Pokémon lore has it that product distributor Wizards of the Coast made just 10 of these Raichu cards for their employees and stamped “pre-release” on the front. While it’s rarely offered for sale, collectors believe it can fetch up to $10,000.

5. Tropical Wind Tropical Mega Battle // $70,000

Another card that was given only to winners at a tournament—in this case, the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle Pokémon World Championship in Honolulu, Hawaii—the Tropical Wind card is believed to have just 14 PSA 9 cards in circulation. One sold for $70,000.

6. Espeon Gold Star// $22,100

This 2007 character card graded PSA 10 sold for $22,100 on eBay recently. An NFT (non-fungible token) version sold for $28,285.

7. Blastoise // $20,000

This combat turtle from 1999 was put up in a perfect condition PSA 10 and sold for $20,000.

8. Shining Gyarados // $12,000

This 2001 Neo Revelations card brought in $12,000 on eBay.

9. Giovanni's Scheme // $10,100

Never released in English, this 2017 Japanese card is highly sought after by collectors. A perfect PSA 10 card sold for $10,100 on eBay.

10. Umbreon Holo // $5150

This 2003 card sold for $5150 after buyers took notice of its PSA 10 status.

A version of this story ran in 2017; it has been updated for 2021.

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Источник: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/502831/5-most-valuable-pokemon-cards

Pokemon cards worth any money -

It has been over twenty-five years since the first time fans memorized the Pokemon slogan, and since then, the Pokemon trading card game has taken root in the world. The competitive Pokemon card game is still a favourite for most people. Every new year, new Japanese Pokemon cards are printed. Apart from players meeting to compete in TCG, others are all about by the craze for collecting Japanese Pokemon cards. Do you believe the fuss around Japanese Pokemon cards being worth anything? How about reading on for more details about Japanese Pokemon cards?

Are Japanese Pokemon cards worth anything?

The life of every card in the Pokemon universe begins at Pokemon Card Laboratories in Japan, before their distribution to other countries for printing in different languages. As a result, the number of non-Japanese collectors has constantly been on the rise. While most of them are interested in collecting Pokemon cards, others focus on owning the Japanese originals. As a result, they are willing to part with a dime for them.

Are Japanese Pokemon cards worth anything?

Over the past year, rare Pokemon collectables have become a trend thanks to famous internet personalities and streamers who have been showing off their packs. Some collect them as a long-term investment, while others do so on a short term basis and resell them when their value shoots.

This craze has caused the price of the oldest Pokemon collectables to fluctuate. Ever since the list was initially published, a few rare Pokemon cards have been introduced through the game's most recent sets.

A Japanese Pokemon card is unique because it is the source card for all the other translated versions. Therefore, non-Japanese collectors have an obsession with obtaining collectables that will never be released in their countries.

While English cards have many deviations, collectors claim that Japanese collectables are more superior. An example is promotional cards, which are released in Japan and priced highly. Examples of such collectables include the older CoroCoro Shining Mew, the 15th Anniversary Full Art Pikachu and the newer Battle Festa Pikachu.

Japanese Pokemon cards value

Cards from Japan cannot be used for tournaments outside Japan. However, foreigners can use them to play in Japan. As a result, playable collectables have a higher resale value. However, the challenge is in non-Japanese collectors bidding in auctions since they are not part of the competitive Japanese auctions.

Japanese Pokemon cards price guide

Japanese Pokemon ex

It might be tricky to evaluate whether you are looking at a deal or not in a Pokemon card community. However, there is an easy way to tell how much a Japanese standard format card is worth. Standard format cards are those that are used in current tournaments. While most western websites give a rough idea of how much the collectables are worth, this simple pricing rule will clear your doubts about the legitimacy of a deal.

  • English Pokemon EX Card Price x 50–66% = Japanese Pokemon EX Card Price

Alternatively, you could use this pricing rule, especially for Gold cards and Full Art cards.

  • English Trainer Card Price x 150–200% = Japanese Trainer Card Price

The difference in pricing is attributed to the significantly lower number of Japanese collectors and more players. Therefore, there is a higher demand for playable Pokemon cards and Trainer cards. Meanwhile, the pull rates for EX cards are way better than in English booster backs.

Are Japanese Pokemon cards fake?

The authenticity of the collectable can be determined by specific physical characteristics like the colour, quality of material, spelling, font, text placement, holographic effect and cutting method. To differentiate a genuine from a fake Pokemon card, you should perform the 'Rip' and 'light' tests.

How to check the condition for Japanese cards

Is Pokemon TCG popular in Japan? There are more players than collectors in Japan; therefore, the game is popular in the country. Thus, card sellers have a likelihood of not providing standardized information about the condition of the card. Nonetheless, when a card gets damaged, its value depreciates. Therefore, you should be careful when a price sounds too good to be true.

In most cases, though, most sellers provide a brief description of the card's condition, which you can access by pasting it on the online translator.

Which is worth more Japanese or English Pokemon cards?

Japanese Pokemon collectables

Condition is the main determining factor in evaluating the value of a collectable. Pokemon cards are not any different. While Japanese collectables are not as easy to damage, English ones come in a better condition. Therefore, English collectables are worth more than Japanese ones.

Can I buy Pokemon cards from Japan?

Yes, you can, although you would make a killing if you did so at the opportune moment. So, when is the best time to buy Japanese Pokemon cards? When new cards are released in Japan, their value skyrockets and stay that way until they are released in English. During that time, unplayable Super Rare (SR) and Rare Rare are worth enough to increase when purchasing the Japanese Pokemon cards booster box.

After that time, the unplayable Japanese Pokemon cards' value plunges, while the playable ones maintain their value when sold from Japan. However, when the card leaves Japan, its price plummets due to the diminished markets since its market comprises collectors.

What Japanese Pokemon cards are worth money?

Japanese Pokemon collectables

While Pokemon remains a popular game, the franchise keeps on producing new types of cards, although none of them can attain the height of the rarest collectables in history. The. This Japanese Pokemon cards list has the rarest collectables that have become a hot trend.

  • Holo Gold Star Rayquaza- $4500
  • Tropical Mega Battle- $10,000
  • Ancient Mew- $25
  • Holographic Shadowless Charizard- $500,000
  • Holographic Shadowless Venusaur- $3260
  • Holographic Shadowless Blastoise: $2475
  • Pokemon Players’ Club Shiny Umbreon- $1900
  • Pokemon Player’s Club Shiny Espeon- $2000
  • Shining Charizard- $2000
  • Holographic Shadowless Mewtwo- $20,000
  • Misprinted Fossil Krabby- $2200
  • Master’s Key- $21,000
  • Parent-And-Child Event Kangaskhan- $100,000
  • Prototype Blastoise- $360,000
  • Pokemon Snap Trainer Magazine Pikachu- $900
  • Southern Islands Reverse Holo Mew- $200
  • Tamamushi University Magikarp- $50,000
  • Holographic First Edition Machamp- $6000
  • The Masked Royal Prize Promo- $18,000
  • Shiny Secret Rare Charizard V- $500
  • Holographic Shadowless First Edition Chansey- $1100
  • Trade Please!- $858
  • Pokemon Illustrator- $250,000
  • Pokemon Art Academy Pikachu- $1000
  • Pre-Release Raichu- $10,000

Where can I sell my Japanese Pokemon cards?

If you have Japanese Pokemon cards for sale and wonder which platform is the safest to use when selling them, these are some of the options to consider.

  • eBay
  • Facebook groups and Instagram
  • Mercari
  • Card Shows and Stores

Out of the options, eBay is the most reliable platform. It is a large online platform; hence, there is a high likelihood of more sellers seeing your post.

If you wondered whether Japanese Pokemon cards are worth it, these details must have enlightened you on the topic and more. However, before making any transaction, you ought to conduct a background check of the indicated price and legitimacy of the collectable.

READ ALSO: How old is Goku? What's his real age in each Dragon Ball Z saga

Briefly.co.za recently published enlightening details about Goku. If you are a fan of the Dragon Ball series, you might want to check these details out.

Goku is a fictional character, and the Dragon Ball series reflects his ageing process as he tackles different missions. He is a young boy and later transitions into a mature man and later an older man. The details give an account of his age and superpowers on each one of the missions.

DISCLAIMER: This article is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional advice or help and should not be relied on to make decisions of any kind. Any action you take upon the information presented in this article is strictly at your own risk and responsibility!

Source: Briefly.co.za

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Источник: https://briefly.co.za/104229-are-japanese-pokemon-cards-worth-price-guide-top-collectibles.html
  The Associated Press

NEW YORK (AP) — Americans have become obsessed with collectibles, bidding up prices for trading cards, video games and other mementos of their youth. The frenzy has brought small fortunes to some, but a deep frustration for those who still love to play games or trade cards as a hobby.

Among the items most sought after — and even fought over — are the relics of millennials’ childhoods. These include copies of trading cards such as Pokemon’s Charizard and Magic: The Gathering’s Black Lotus as well as Nintendo’s Super Mario Bros. game cartridges. Some cards are selling for hundreds of thousands of dollars and an unopened Super Mario game recently sold for a record $2 million.

This is more than a case of opportunistic collectors looking to cash in on a burst of nostalgia triggered by the pandemic. Everyone seemingly is angling for a piece of the pie.

But while some collectors and investors see dollar signs, others complain about the breakdown of their tight-knit communities. Players looking to play in-person again after the pandemic are unable to find the game pieces they want; if the pieces are available, prices have gone up astronomically.

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“Prices are going up, and access is going down,” said Brian Lewis, who operates a YouTube channel under the name Tolarian Community College.

The collectibles frenzy has been fueled partly by YouTube personalities. Logan Paul, who has 23 million subscribers on YouTube, made several videos where he simply opens up boxes of vintage Pokemon cards, hyping the prices he’d paid and bringing in millions of views.

“It may be a burgeoning industry, but this is still big business. Brands want to reach these audiences,” said Justin Kline, co-founder of Markerly, an influencer marketing agency. He estimates Paul may bring in six figures per video in advertising revenue.

The hype has sent collectors scrambling to find out if their Pikachu or Mox Emerald might be worth a fortune. To do so, they turn to grading services, which have been flooded with orders — some with a wait time of over a year.

In response to record demand, companies are releasing new versions of the games, including premium products that command higher prices. Whether the momentum is sustainable, at least when to comes to prices, is unknown.

But the frenzy goes beyond trading cards. The U.S. Mint released a 100th Anniversary collection of the Morgan silver dollar, considered by coin collectors to be one of the most beautiful designs ever made, early this summer. The products sold out in minutes.

There's also been record sales of vintage video games, from the Legend of Zelda to Super Mario 64.

Meanwhile, the trading card community is seeing its own lofty prices as players scramble to find coveted pieces for their collection.

A mint condition Black Lotus from Magic: The Gathering’s first set known as Alpha, sold in January for more than $510,000. That price is double what a card in similar condition sold for six months before in July 2020.

Austin Deceder, 25, primarily buys and sells cards on Facebook and Twitter as a middleman between players wanting to get out of their games and new players. Deceder had a used Black Lotus card that he says he sold for $7,000 in September 2020. “Here we are now and the price on that same card has doubled.”

It’s not just the ultra-rare cards seeing inflation. Take the widely available Magic: The Gathering card named “Ragavan, Nimble Pilferer.” The card, depicting a bespectacled monkey sitting on a hoard of treasure, was $30 earlier this summer. The card now sells for closer to $90, Deceder says.

Not everyone is happy, however. Some enthusiasts say the frenzy has brought out the worst in fans and speculators. Nowhere is this more evident than among collectors of Pokemon cards, with its motto “Gotta Catch ’Em All!”

Boxes of Pokemon trading cards have been routinely sold out at hobbyist shops and big-box retail stores. Fistfights have broken out, requiring chains like Target to restrict the number of packs an individual customer can purchase. The Pokemon Company says it is trying to print as many cards as possible to keep up.

“Pretty much the entire Pokemon community has deteriorated,” said Shelbie, a creator of Pokémon videos under the name Frosted Caribou on YouTube. Shelbie, who declined to give a last name to avoid being a target of harassment, said some harassment in the past has come from some of the community’s biggest collectors, particularly when she has talked about prices.

But the surge of interest has been good for the corporations and Wall Street.

Hasbro’s Wizards of the Coast division makes the tabletop role-playing game “Dungeons & Dragons” as well as Magic: The Gathering. Wizards' revenue doubled to $406 million in the second quarter.

Meanwhile, private equity giant Blackstone purchased a majority stake in Certified Collectibles Group, a company that grades collectibles like trading cards, in July for $500 million.

Whether that’s good for the players who have long participated in these hobbies is unknown. Long-time collectors likely stand to make money in the future, but those who recently entered these communities may be purchasing overpriced cards hyped by those to stand to benefit the most, community leaders said.

“There’s now a whole subculture who are using Pokemon as a stock market. I don’t know how those people can look at the community and say this is healthy,” Shelbie said.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2021/09/03/collectible-video-games-trading-card-prices-skyrocketing/5711334001/

How to Determine the Value of Your Old Pokémon Cards

Your friendly neighborhood slacker. Chill Clinton likes to write about film, music, collectibles, and more.

Is My Old Pokémon Card Collection Worth Anything?

So you've rediscovered your old Pokémon cards. But how do you know if you've struck gold or struck out with them? Below is some advice on determining your collection's value, based on my experience appraising and buying old card collections.

  1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From
  2. Check the Condition of Your Cards
  3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From

For the purpose of this article, I will largely focus on cards produced by Wizards of the Coast from 1998–2003. These are the classic "vintage" Pokémon cards that many of us in our mid-twenties to mid-thirties remember collecting as children, and they're the ones adults commonly find when they go digging for their old binder of cards.

This is not to say that Pokémon cards produced after this time period don't have comparable value, but I would need the length of a book to write a guide that would encompass the entire Pokémon trading card ecosystem.

Knowing what era of cards you have is an important first step. Below, you can find all of the set symbols from vintage-era Pokémon sets, which you can use to identify which sets your cards belong to.

2. Check the Condition of Your Cards

As someone who regularly purchases large collections, often from people who discovered them after a decade or more of misplacement, I find that people have a difficult time accepting that their ten-year-old selves did not do a great job of preserving the condition of their cards.

Signs of Wear to Watch For

Collectors are extremely detail-oriented. Cards that exhibit creases, scratches on the holographic image, or any visible whitening on the corners are generally not highly valued.

Cards that display signs of any mishandling or improper storage will not be very valuable. Even minor damage can bring down a card's value to just a fraction of the "market values" displayed on many websites. And collectors are as concerned with the front of the card as they are with the back, where oftentimes it is easiest to see signs of wear.

Below I've included an image of a condition I commonly find when appraising childhood collections. If your cards show signs of wear similar to the ones below, they will have to be exceptionally rare to hold significant value.

3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

Even if your collection isn't in the best condition, you might still have a hidden gem, that collectors will take significant interest in. Naturally, your Base Set 2 Mr. Mimes and Jungle Kangaskhans will not be worth the toil of finding an interested buyer if they aren't in impeccable condition, but this isn't the case for all cards.

Below, I've included a quick list of things to look out for when determining which of your cards are most likely to return value.

1st Edition

A designation unique to the Wizards of the Coast era of Pokémon cards, indicating that the card was produced during the first distribution cycle of the set. These cards, especially those from Base Set, have a significantly lower population, and are therefore more widely sought, bringing in significantly higher sale prices than their reprints. You can see the 1st edition stamp beside the bottom left corner of the illustration frame.

Shadowless

You may have heard this term in reference to high-priced Charizard cards, but did you know that all Base Set cards have a "shadowless" printing? This label is applied to cards produced during the second distribution cycle of Base Set. During this printing, the cards no longer had the 1st edition stamp, but still lacked the drop shadow beside the right side of the frame, which would become a persistent design feature in subsequent vintage Pokémon sets. See the example below.

Charizards

Unless your card looks like you saved it as it was going through the wood chipper, nearly any Charizard card printed from 1998–2003 will have some degree of collector interest. Of course, the value of these Charizards depends heavily on their printing and condition, but this icon of the vintage Pokémon era is typically able to return some value, regardless of whether you have a Base Set 2 Charizard, Blaine's Charizard, or a Shining Charizard.

Shining Pokémon

During the Neo series, from 2000 to 2001, Pokémon introduced one of the most iconic series of variant Pokémon called "Shining." The "Shining Collection" consists of twenty cards available through packs, and one card available as a promo. Regardless of condition, these cards tend to evoke interest from collectors for their extremely low population, and unique printing style, featuring textured gold accents on the illustration.

Southern Island Cards

This was a special mini-set of cards released in 2001 to promote the second Pokémon movie. This set was distributed through two different promotional folders, each holding each halves of a complete 18 card set. Though not all of these promos are widely sought, complete sets of these cards can go for hundreds of dollars.

How to Appraise and Sell Your Collection

Once you take some time to learn about the cards that you have and what their potential value might be, you might find it's time to sell.

If you are not an experienced trading card reseller, I would highly discourage you from selling cards directly to consumers. There are many risks that come into play when selling cards online, including inaccurate listings, condition disputes, and the possibility of unintentionally selling fake cards, which might be hard to spot without the knowledge and experience to authenticate cards yourself.

Selling cards online also requires a significant time commitment, shipping and packaging costs, and listing fees that might leave you feeling discouraged if you don't have the process and infrastructure needed to mitigate these factors.

Working With a Local Dealer

I would recommend selling your collection to a dealer in your area. These folks dedicate a significant portion of their time to buying and reselling Pokémon cards on a professional or semi-professional level, and they may be interested in acquiring your collection.

However, it's important to understand that the dealer's motivation is to resell your cards at a profit, so they will often offer about half the market value of your cards, considering the condition of your collection. But consider this as a convenience fee for selling your cards without having to seek out and render service to dozens or hundreds of buyers.

There are a ton of hidden costs and hours of labor behind the market values you see on popular websites. Even if your cards are in impeccable condition, if you approach a dealer, understand that they need to compensate themselves for the labor of selling the cards despite the costs inherent to selling, and those considerations will impact how much they are able to offer you.

Estimate the Value of Your Cards Before Negotiating With the Dealer

By simply understanding the rough value of your cards before meeting with a dealer, and understanding their motivations and limitations, you can manage your expectations and negotiate with dealers more effectively, to ensure you're getting the best value possible.

Best of luck, and happy hunting for your old collection!

Источник: https://hobbylark.com

As my partner and I were preparing to move in together, earlier this spring, she pulled out a box of Pokémon cards she had held on to since she was a kid in the ’90s.

“Want to see if these are worth anything?” she asked me offhandedly.

We’d heard that Pokémon was making a comeback. Vintage Charizard cards were going for thousands of dollars: last year, YouTuber Logan Paul bought one for $150,000 while rapper Logic reportedly paid $220,574 for the same version (all figures US).

I took out the stack of a few dozen cards, stored all these years in a decoupage tin and mixed with other tokens of the era—buttons and pieces of cardboard bearing Sailor Mercury’s likeness—and, one by one, started to search for them on pricing websites.

The first few queries yielded expected results for twenty-year-old childhood relics: $5 here, $7 there. Then I picked up one card featuring a holographic image of the turtle-like Blastoise. This little monster was among the most iconic Pokémon—the final evolution of one of the three starters players can choose from in the classic Game Boy game. If any of the cards was going to be worth something, it was this one.

I typed its name and number into the search bar, and when the results appeared, I dropped the card in shock. Of the first five listings that appeared for the Blastoise, the lowest was a cool $820. And if we had the coveted first-edition version? A professionally graded mint-quality copy was going for nearly $50,000.

A quick glance at its price history showed me that this piece of shiny cardboard that my girlfriend had ferried around from crappy apartment to crappy apartment was not only pricey but, thanks to a global pandemic that had renewed interest in collectible cards, more valuable than ever.

Pokémon may forever be associated with the schoolyards of the ’90s, but trading cards have been around for much longer. In the late nineteenth century, the original “trade cards” were inserted into the backs of cigarette packs and functioned as both advertisements for businesses or products and stiffeners for extra protection. Since they often featured amusing cartoon-like images, people began collecting them in scrapbooks. Sports cards—mainly for baseball—quickly followed suit.

Trading-card games, however, are a relatively new phenomenon. In 1991, mathematician Richard Garfield was challenged by his friend, Wizards of the Coast founder Peter Adkison, to combine the popularity of baseball cards with a board game. The idea was for players to accumulate a collection of various cards to build a deck and play with. Two years later, Garfield launched Magic: The Gathering—widely recognized as the first trading-card game—which quickly sold out after its first run and spawned the creation of other beloved games, including Pokémon and Yu-Gi-Oh, in the late ’90s.

People of all ages still play these tabletop games, but a blossoming secondary collectors’ market has emerged, particularly for the acquisition of rare vintage cards from the original print runs.

Last year, eBay reported that there were over 4 million more trading cards sold on the platform than in 2019, with Pokémon sales increasing by 574 percent. Outside of eBay, professional auction sites are pulling in record sales of vintage sports and trading cards nearly every month. At one of those auctions this June, an autographed Tom Brady rookie card was listed for $750,000 and, after a manic thirty-two-bid war, was eventually sold to an anonymous buyer for over $3.1 million—a price some might consider a steal compared with the NBA and MLB cards that sold over the past year for $5.2 million each.

The collector frenzy isn’t just happening online. While other brick-and-mortar retailers suffered under the weight of COVID-19—the Canadian Federation of Independent Business estimates that one in six small businesses could close due to the pandemic—game stores saw their sales surge.

Dylan Kirkup, the e-commerce manager at Toronto’s 401 Games, which buys and resells old trading cards, says sales of products like Pokémon cards doubled and even tripled over the course of 2020. “Other businesses were seeing a lot of the negative effects of the pandemic and these lockdowns,” he says. “We found ourselves on the exact opposite end of that spectrum.”

When my girlfriend purchased her small Pokémon collection as an eight-year-old in 1999, she was more interested in the pretty pictures of her favourite characters than in actually playing the game. But that half-hearted interest—coupled with her hesitation to throw things away—paid off. The same millennials who collected those cards as kids but didn’t hold on to them are now adults with jobs and money to spend, and since social activities, travel, and big-ticket expenses have been largely on pause, it makes sense that some people would invest those excess funds into collectible cardboard.

From some quick internet research, I learned that our high-priced collectible was even more valuable because it was from the first Pokémon card set ever printed, commonly known as the base set. Cards from the first run of that set bear a fancy little “first edition” stamp on the left-hand side, and those are the highest valued, netting auction prices of hundreds of thousands of dollars. This March, a first-edition Charizard broke a record as the most expensive Pokémon card ever sold, racking up $399,750 on Goldin Auctions. Our card was from the second run of that first set—commonly known as “shadowless” because the card’s image box doesn’t have a drop shadow behind it like on later printings. Shadowless cards are not as rare as first-edition cards, but they’re a lot more rare—and expensive—than other cards from the base set.

Zack Browning is an expert in the minute details that make these types of cards so valuable. The Chicago-based card collector boasts one of the most expansive Pokémon collections in the world, which he estimates is worth somewhere between $3 and $5 million and which includes mint-condition versions of nearly every card from the vintage ’90s era. Browning started collecting cards as a kid, when his grandmother would gift him packs. But, when he became an adult, it became a part-time pursuit.

“When I left college, I started making a little bit of money, and I wanted to spend some of it on what I enjoyed as a kid, so I went and bought some Pokémon cards and started building sets,” he says. “It’s developed into this massive pursuit, but that was never initially the goal . . . . I’ve helped many, many others follow their passions and find their own childhood collections.”

As it turns out, nostalgia is a valuable commodity. According to research by Le Moyne College psychologist Krystine Batcho, our attraction to the past increases during times of great instability or change—like, say, a global pandemic. She has found that people with greater propensities for nostalgia are better able to cope with adversity and turmoil.

“One of the most important aspects of being a healthy human being is having a sense that you are in control of things,” Batcho said during a 2019 interview with the American Psychological Association. “When things start to change . . . it’s comforting to have a nostalgic feeling for the past that reminds us that, although we don’t know what the future is going to bring, what we do know is that we know who we have been and who we really are.”

While COVID-19 may have spurred the renewed interest in collectibles, Browning predicts that these cards will become even more valuable as the millennials who first drove the craze in the ’90s earn more money to put toward recapturing their schoolyard obsessions. As time passes, he says, people tend to feel more nostalgic for their childhoods—a longing soothed, perhaps, by holding a shadowless Blastoise or a Tom Brady rookie card in their hands. And they’ll always pay a premium for that.

While I was tempted to hold on to the Blastoise in the hope that our descendants could make thousands off it in a few decades, we ultimately decided to sell the card. On a crisp March day in a Vancouver park, I met a man from one of the many Facebook Marketplace groups I joined this year. I’d listed the card for what felt like a reasonable deal considering its slightly roughed-up condition compared with similar ones I saw on eBay, and he ended up offering me around $300 for it.

Between that and the money I made from selling some dozen other cards we’d pulled out of the closet, my girlfriend and I netted enough for a new couch, which in our current life is more useful than being able to relive our pasts.

When I handed off the card in the park, the guy’s eyes lit up. I asked him what he planned to do with it—if he would go to the trouble of professionally grading it to resell to some other collector down the line or keep it long-term for his own nostalgia.

He said he might keep it for his kids to have in twenty years, so they could see what his childhood was like.

Mel Woods

Mel Woods

Mel Woods is a Vancouver-based writer and audio producer, and a staff writer at Xtra Magazine. Their work has appeared in HuffPost Canada, Vice, Slate, The Tyee, and the Globe and Mail.

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Mathias Ball

Mathias Ball is an illustrator from a little town along the coast of Lake Huron. Their work has appeared in Reader's Digest, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and more.

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Источник: https://thewalrus.ca/gotta-catch-em-all-why-old-pokemon-cards-are-suddenly-worth-thousands/

What Are the 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards?

Money / Wealth

Pokemon Cards

apilarinos / iStock.com

Pokémon, short for pocket monsters, was first introduced in 1996 in Japan. It quickly gained popularity and remains a fan favorite 25 years later. Initially a video game series, the brand now has a show, trading card game and toys.

System for Ranking Pokémon Trading Cards

The Pokémon trading cards quickly became coveted collector’s items, especially for diehard fans. The cards are marked with one of three symbols in the bottom-right corner:

  • Common cards have a black circle
  • Uncommon cards have a black diamond
  • Rare cards have a black star

But the ranking system doesn’t stop there. There are also unique card designs.

Unique Pokémon Card Designs:

  • Holo rare cards that have a shimmery, shiny effect to the image
  • Reverse holo cards are shiny and shimmery everywhere except on the image
  • Ultra-rare cards have the greatest Pokémon characters and are called EX, GX, V, Half Art or Half Body
  • Full Art or Full Body cards have a picture that covers the entire card, with words overlapping the image
  • Each card has a number, but Secret Rare cards have special numbers, like 113/115
  • Rainbow Rare cards are part of Pokémon’s Sun and Moon series
  • Promo cards are exclusively available at Pokémon events

Top 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards

Do you have one of the most expensive Pokémon cards? Do you own any of these and are your cards worth the money? Here’s the list of the 10 highest-selling Pokémon cards.

1. Ex Deoxys Gold Star Holo Rayquaza 107

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $45,100

What makes the card special: Rayquaza is a legendary Pokémon that first surfaced as a character in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for the Game Boy Advance. In 2005, Rayquaza received its own card from an expansion series called Ex Deoxys TCG.

Specifics of the particular sale: The card sold was graded by Professional Sports Association, the largest third-party trading card grading company. PSA rated the card as GEM MINT 10, which is near perfect condition.

2. Ex Dragon Frontiers Gold Star Holo Charizard 100

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $60,065

What makes it special: Charizard is a popular character with many coveted card variations. This particular card was introduced in the same 2005 Ex Deoxys TCG as the No. 10 trading card. This variant is special because the artwork differs from traditional Charizard base cards. Trading card game rules also allow only one of these cards in your deck during a battle, adding to its value.

3. Tropical Mega Battle Tropical Wind Promo Card

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $65,100

What makes it special: This was a trophy card during the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle in Hawaii. The tournament was an invite-only event where players from around the world competed.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

4. 1998 Japanese Promo Card – Tamamushi University Magikarp Trophy

Card sale date: February 2021

Card selling price: $66,100

What makes it special: Another promotional card, this was only awarded during a single 2-day event held in Japan. To enter the competition, people had to complete a test called the “Tamamushi University Hyper Test.” After entries were received, 1,000 participants were selected to participate in the tournament, and those who won a battle got this card.

Magikarp normally can’t learn Dragon Rage, a move it has on this card, but those who scored well on the first rendition of the test were given this Magikarp with Dragon Rage in their Pokémon video game as well.

5. Super-Secret Battle “#1 Trainer” Promotional Holo Card

Card sale date: July 2020

Card selling price: $90,000

What makes it special: Best estimates show that only seven people were awarded this unique card during a 1999 Japan tournament. Players had to compete and win in regional tournaments to enter the national tournament for a chance at this super-secret battle trainer card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

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6. Neo Genesis First Edition Holo Lugia

Card sale date: May 2021

Card selling price: $144,300

What makes it special: Many people love Lugia cards, since the Pokémon was on the box art for the second generation of Pokémon games. It’s not uncommon for collectors to have one — PWCC, the largest trading card marketplace, says almost 1,300 have been submitted — but only 41 have received a PSA 10 rating. PWCC believes this card may sell for even more in the future.

Specifics of the particular sale: This card received a rating of Pristine 10 from another well-known card grading company, Beckett Grading Services.

7. Japanese Promo Card – Family Event Trophy – Holo Kangaskhan

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $150,100

What makes it special: As one of the rarest cards in the world, it was only given to a handful of winners during an exclusive 1998 Parent/Child Mega Battle tournament in Japan. Families battled against each other, and only the ones that could get a certain number of wins got this card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA has only rated 46 of these cards in total, with only this one receiving a perfect 10.

8. Backless Blastoise Commissioned Presentation Galaxy Star Holo

Card sale date: January 2021

Card selling price: $360,000

What makes it special: In 1998, before Pokémon came to the USA and skyrocketed in popularity, Wizards of the Coast did a test run for some Pokémon cards. This card came from that run, which was never meant for the public and doesn’t have any printing on the back of the card.

9. First Edition Charizard Holo

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $369,000

What makes it special:Another Charizard card, this one is a first edition of the shadowless holo card. This was an early Pokémon design, which means it was simple, without shading behind art and text to make the graphics pop.

Specifics of the particular sale: This particular card is ranked as a Gold Label Pristine 10 by SGC, another card-rating company.

10. 1998 Japanese Promo Card Holo Illustrator Pikachu

Card sale date: February 2021

Card selling price: $375,000

What makes it special: As the most popular and well-known Pokémon character, it’s no surprise that Pikachu tops the list of most valuable Pokémon cards. Only 39 Illustrator Pikachu cards were given out, to the winners of three art competitions conducted by CoroCoro Comic magazine.

Competitors created their own Pokémon art, and winners received this Pikachu card, showing the character drawing two other Pokémon — Charmander and Mew. This artwork was created by Atsuko Nishida, who designed Pikachu for the Game Boy Advance.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card as near mint condition grade seven, which is coded as PSA 7 NRMT.

Expert Advice

A card’s condition has a lot to do with the value. Before you sell your card, or before you pay a lot to buy one, have it examined and verified by a Pokémon trading card expert.

As the most successful media franchise in the world, Pokémon products are in high demand and new rare cards are still being printed. If you can get your hands on one, you may be able to get a hefty profit out of your hobby.

Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

About the Author

Katy Hebebrand is a freelance writer with eight years of experience in the financial industry. She earned her BA from the University of West Florida and her MA from Full Sail University. Since beginning to work full-time as a freelance writer three years ago, she has written on topics spanning many fields, including home building, families and parenting, legal and professional/corporate communications.

Источник: https://www.gobankingrates.com/money/wealth/most-expensive-pokemon-cards/

10 of the Most Valuable Pokémon Cards

As a teenager, Pokémon creator Satoshi Tajiri was so fond of collecting insects that classmates called him “Mr. Bug.” While it might not have been an affectionate label, Tajiri had the last laugh: His Pokémon video game, originally released for the Nintendo Game Boy in 1996, has become an enduring multimedia success, selling billions in games, merchandise, and phone apps.

The goal of collecting and pitting monsters against one another has been particularly appealing for trading card collectors, who have created an entire secondary market for the low-tech version of the game. The all-time sales record as of May 2021 might be this Blastoise card sold at auction for a whopping $360,000, but it's not a card you ever would have found in a pack. Wizards of the Coast, which manufactures the card game, printed just one to show to Nintendo.

Fortunately, other cards are a little more accessible, though first editions, misprints, and other characteristics all affect value. If you’re curious, take a look at 10 of the most valuable Pokémon cards according to Heritage Auctions, eBay, and other sources.

1. Pikachu Illustrator // $250,000

One of the earliest cards to come out of the Pokémon franchise was this promotional card of Pikachu that was given out to winners of an illustration contest in 1998. An estimated 20 to 39 copies were issued. In late 2016, Heritage Auctions sold one for a whopping $54,970. In July 2020, a card graded by Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) as a 9 out of 10 fetched $250,000.

2. Shadowless Holo Charizard // $507,000

This dragon-esque creature was first seen in 1999. More than 20 years later, a PSA 10 card sold for a whopping $507,000 on eBay.

3. Master's Key Prize Card // $22,000

Given out during a 2010 card championship in Japan, only 34 copies of the Master's Key Prize Card are thought to exist. The scarcity helps the cards command a high price when they hit the market. One ungraded card sold for $22,000 in November 2019.

4. Pre-Release Raichu // $10,000

Collectors love cards that were never intended for public distribution, and this Raichu card fits the bill. Although unconfirmed, Pokémon lore has it that product distributor Wizards of the Coast made just 10 of these Raichu cards for their employees and stamped “pre-release” on the front. While it’s rarely offered for sale, collectors believe it can fetch up to $10,000.

5. Tropical Wind Tropical Mega Battle // $70,000

Another card that was given only to winners at a tournament—in this case, the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle Pokémon World Championship in Honolulu, Hawaii—the Tropical Wind card is believed to have just 14 PSA 9 cards in circulation. One sold for $70,000.

6. Espeon Gold Star// $22,100

This 2007 character card graded PSA 10 sold for $22,100 on eBay recently. An NFT (non-fungible token) version sold for $28,285.

7. Blastoise // $20,000

This combat turtle from 1999 was put up in a perfect condition PSA 10 and sold for $20,000.

8. Shining Gyarados // $12,000

This 2001 Neo Revelations card brought in $12,000 on eBay.

9. Giovanni's Scheme // $10,100

Never released in English, this 2017 Japanese card is highly sought after by collectors. A perfect PSA 10 card sold for $10,100 on eBay.

10. Umbreon Holo // $5150

This 2003 card sold for $5150 after buyers took notice of its PSA 10 status.

A version of this story ran in 2017; it has been updated for 2021.

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Источник: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/502831/5-most-valuable-pokemon-cards
pokemon cards worth any money

Pokemon cards worth any money -

Your old Pokémon cards are now worth hundreds of dollars

There's been a resurgence of Pokémon card collecting, and Pokémon fans that have long since grown-up into working, money-earning adults are now more than happy to pay a pretty penny to round out their extensive Pokémon card collections.

Of course, just how much your cards are worth depends on what you’ve got.

In 2016 the Pikachu Illustrator Pokémon card sold at a Heritage Auctions sale for more than $54,000, due to its rarity. Only 20 to 39 copies of the card were produced – so if you’re sitting on one – now is the time to sell.

ebay pokemon card listing

eBay

But that isn’t to say some of the more common cards aren’t worth anything.

In an article for The Sun in the UK, collectables expert Tracey Martin said that holographic cards are the most valuable, and cards released between 1999 and 2000 – known as ‘shadowless’ Pokémon  cards – are now highly sought-after.

Average Pokemon cards might only earn you around $10 a piece, while an authenticated card in mint condition, such as the Raichu shadowless holographic cards released in 1999, is worth up to $4000.

A 1999 first edition shadowless charmeleon can be worth up to $500, while a Nidorino shadowless first edition base set card in mint condition could fetch you up to $160. There's even an Australian card collectors site where Pokemon cards can fetch anything from $5 to $800. 

charizard collectable card

Cherry Collectables

But if you don’t have any of those cards in your collection, don’t stress yet. If you happened to be one of the lucky kids who got a first edition base set of Pokémon cards, then the set itself could be worth money too!

 So, what do you do if you own of these rare cards?

  • If the cards you have a low level (sitting at the $100 mark) it could be wise to hold on to them for another few years.
  • Keep all your cards in mint condition an in cases.
  • Get them authenticated and rated by the Professional Sports Authenticator.
  • Find out how much you card is worth by researching similar cards sold on eBay and other collector sites.
  • Check things such as print and release dates, condition, and whether or not you still have the original packaging.

You might also like:

Your old Cabbage Patch doll could be worth thousands of dollars 

Your Harry Potter books could be worth thousands of dollars 

These '90s toys are now worth hundreds of dollars 

Источник: https://www.bhg.com.au/your-old-pokemon-cards-are-now-worth-hundreds-of-dollars

What Are the 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards?

Money / Wealth

Pokemon Cards

apilarinos / iStock.com

Pokémon, short for pocket monsters, was first introduced in 1996 in Japan. It quickly gained popularity and remains a fan favorite 25 years later. Initially a video game series, the brand now has a show, trading card game and toys.

System for Ranking Pokémon Trading Cards

The Pokémon trading cards quickly became coveted collector’s items, especially for diehard fans. The cards are marked with one of three symbols in the bottom-right corner:

  • Common cards have a black circle
  • Uncommon cards have a black diamond
  • Rare cards have a black star

But the ranking system doesn’t stop there. There are also unique card designs.

Unique Pokémon Card Designs:

  • Holo rare cards that have a shimmery, shiny effect to the image
  • Reverse holo cards are shiny and shimmery everywhere except on the image
  • Ultra-rare cards have the greatest Pokémon characters and are called EX, GX, V, Half Art or Half Body
  • Full Art or Full Body cards have a picture that covers the entire card, with words overlapping the image
  • Each card has a number, but Secret Rare cards have special numbers, like 113/115
  • Rainbow Rare cards are part of Pokémon’s Sun and Moon series
  • Promo cards are exclusively available at Pokémon events

Top 10 Most Expensive Pokémon Cards

Do you have one of the most expensive Pokémon cards? Do you own any of these and are your cards worth the money? Here’s the list of the 10 highest-selling Pokémon cards.

1. Ex Deoxys Gold Star Holo Rayquaza 107

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $45,100

What makes the card special: Rayquaza is a legendary Pokémon that first surfaced as a character in Pokémon Ruby and Sapphire for the Game Boy Advance. In 2005, Rayquaza received its own card from an expansion series called Ex Deoxys TCG.

Specifics of the particular sale: The card sold was graded by Professional Sports Association, the largest third-party trading card grading company. PSA rated the card as GEM MINT 10, which is near perfect condition.

2. Ex Dragon Frontiers Gold Star Holo Charizard 100

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $60,065

What makes it special: Charizard is a popular character with many coveted card variations. This particular card was introduced in the same 2005 Ex Deoxys TCG as the No. 10 trading card. This variant is special because the artwork differs from traditional Charizard base cards. Trading card game rules also allow only one of these cards in your deck during a battle, adding to its value.

3. Tropical Mega Battle Tropical Wind Promo Card

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $65,100

What makes it special: This was a trophy card during the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle in Hawaii. The tournament was an invite-only event where players from around the world competed.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

4. 1998 Japanese Promo Card – Tamamushi University Magikarp Trophy

Card sale date: February 2021

Card selling price: $66,100

What makes it special: Another promotional card, this was only awarded during a single 2-day event held in Japan. To enter the competition, people had to complete a test called the “Tamamushi University Hyper Test.” After entries were received, 1,000 participants were selected to participate in the tournament, and those who won a battle got this card.

Magikarp normally can’t learn Dragon Rage, a move it has on this card, but those who scored well on the first rendition of the test were given this Magikarp with Dragon Rage in their Pokémon video game as well.

5. Super-Secret Battle “#1 Trainer” Promotional Holo Card

Card sale date: July 2020

Card selling price: $90,000

What makes it special: Best estimates show that only seven people were awarded this unique card during a 1999 Japan tournament. Players had to compete and win in regional tournaments to enter the national tournament for a chance at this super-secret battle trainer card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card in a GEM MINT 10 condition.

Check Out Our Free Newsletters!

Every day, get fresh ideas on how to save and make money and achieve your financial goals.

6. Neo Genesis First Edition Holo Lugia

Card sale date: May 2021

Card selling price: $144,300

What makes it special: Many people love Lugia cards, since the Pokémon was on the box art for the second generation of Pokémon games. It’s not uncommon for collectors to have one — PWCC, the largest trading card marketplace, says almost 1,300 have been submitted — but only 41 have received a PSA 10 rating. PWCC believes this card may sell for even more in the future.

Specifics of the particular sale: This card received a rating of Pristine 10 from another well-known card grading company, Beckett Grading Services.

7. Japanese Promo Card – Family Event Trophy – Holo Kangaskhan

Card sale date: October 2020

Card selling price: $150,100

What makes it special: As one of the rarest cards in the world, it was only given to a handful of winners during an exclusive 1998 Parent/Child Mega Battle tournament in Japan. Families battled against each other, and only the ones that could get a certain number of wins got this card.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA has only rated 46 of these cards in total, with only this one receiving a perfect 10.

8. Backless Blastoise Commissioned Presentation Galaxy Star Holo

Card sale date: January 2021

Card selling price: $360,000

What makes it special: In 1998, before Pokémon came to the USA and skyrocketed in popularity, Wizards of the Coast did a test run for some Pokémon cards. This card came from that run, which was never meant for the public and doesn’t have any printing on the back of the card.

9. First Edition Charizard Holo

Card sale date: December 2020

Card selling price: $369,000

What makes it special:Another Charizard card, this one is a first edition of the shadowless holo card. This was an early Pokémon design, which means it was simple, without shading behind art and text to make the graphics pop.

Specifics of the particular sale: This particular card is ranked as a Gold Label Pristine 10 by SGC, another card-rating company.

10. 1998 Japanese Promo Card Holo Illustrator Pikachu

Card sale date: February 2021

Card selling price: $375,000

What makes it special: As the most popular and well-known Pokémon character, it’s no surprise that Pikachu tops the list of most valuable Pokémon cards. Only 39 Illustrator Pikachu cards were given out, to the winners of three art competitions conducted by CoroCoro Comic magazine.

Competitors created their own Pokémon art, and winners received this Pikachu card, showing the character drawing two other Pokémon — Charmander and Mew. This artwork was created by Atsuko Nishida, who designed Pikachu for the Game Boy Advance.

Specifics of the particular sale: The PSA rated this card as near mint condition grade seven, which is coded as PSA 7 NRMT.

Expert Advice

A card’s condition has a lot to do with the value. Before you sell your card, or before you pay a lot to buy one, have it examined and verified by a Pokémon trading card expert.

As the most successful media franchise in the world, Pokémon products are in high demand and new rare cards are still being printed. If you can get your hands on one, you may be able to get a hefty profit out of your hobby.

Our in-house research team and on-site financial experts work together to create content that’s accurate, impartial, and up to date. We fact-check every single statistic, quote and fact using trusted primary resources to make sure the information we provide is correct. You can learn more about GOBankingRates’ processes and standards in our editorial policy.

About the Author

Katy Hebebrand is a freelance writer with eight years of experience in the financial industry. She earned her BA from the University of West Florida and her MA from Full Sail University. Since beginning to work full-time as a freelance writer three years ago, she has written on topics spanning many fields, including home building, families and parenting, legal and professional/corporate communications.

Источник: https://www.gobankingrates.com/money/wealth/most-expensive-pokemon-cards/

How to Determine the Value of Your Old Pokémon Cards

Your friendly neighborhood slacker. Chill Clinton likes to write about film, music, collectibles, and more.

Is My Old Pokémon Card Collection Worth Anything?

So you've rediscovered your old Pokémon cards. But how do you know if you've struck gold or struck out with them? Below is some advice on determining your collection's value, based on my experience appraising and buying old card collections.

  1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From
  2. Check the Condition of Your Cards
  3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

1. Understand What Time Period Your Cards Are From

For the purpose of this article, I will largely focus on cards produced by Wizards of the Coast from 1998–2003. These are the classic "vintage" Pokémon cards that many of us in our mid-twenties to mid-thirties remember collecting as children, and they're the ones adults commonly find when they go digging for their old binder of cards.

This is not to say that Pokémon cards produced after this time period don't have comparable value, but I would need the length of a book to write a guide that would encompass the entire Pokémon trading card ecosystem.

Knowing what era of cards you have is an important first step. Below, you can find all of the set symbols from vintage-era Pokémon sets, which you can use to identify which sets your cards belong to.

2. Check the Condition of Your Cards

As someone who regularly purchases large collections, often from people who discovered them after a decade or more of misplacement, I find that people have a difficult time accepting that their ten-year-old selves did not do a great job of preserving the condition of their cards.

Signs of Wear to Watch For

Collectors are extremely detail-oriented. Cards that exhibit creases, scratches on the holographic image, or any visible whitening on the corners are generally not highly valued.

Cards that display signs of any mishandling or improper storage will not be very valuable. Even minor damage can bring down a card's value to just a fraction of the "market values" displayed on many websites. And collectors are as concerned with the front of the card as they are with the back, where oftentimes it is easiest to see signs of wear.

Below I've included an image of a condition I commonly find when appraising childhood collections. If your cards show signs of wear similar to the ones below, they will have to be exceptionally rare to hold significant value.

3. Look for Exceptionally Rare Cards (Regardless of Condition)

Even if your collection isn't in the best condition, you might still have a hidden gem, that collectors will take significant interest in. Naturally, your Base Set 2 Mr. Mimes and Jungle Kangaskhans will not be worth the toil of finding an interested buyer if they aren't in impeccable condition, but this isn't the case for all cards.

Below, I've included a quick list of things to look out for when determining which of your cards are most likely to return value.

1st Edition

A designation unique to the Wizards of the Coast era of Pokémon cards, indicating that the card was produced during the first distribution cycle of the set. These cards, especially those from Base Set, have a significantly lower population, and are therefore more widely sought, bringing in significantly higher sale prices than their reprints. You can see the 1st edition stamp beside the bottom left corner of the illustration frame.

Shadowless

You may have heard this term in reference to high-priced Charizard cards, but did you know that all Base Set cards have a "shadowless" printing? This label is applied to cards produced during the second distribution cycle of Base Set. During this printing, the cards no longer had the 1st edition stamp, but still lacked the drop shadow beside the right side of the frame, which would become a persistent design feature in subsequent vintage Pokémon sets. See the example below.

Charizards

Unless your card looks like you saved it as it was going through the wood chipper, nearly any Charizard card printed from 1998–2003 will have some degree of collector interest. Of course, the value of these Charizards depends heavily on their printing and condition, but this icon of the vintage Pokémon era is typically able to return some value, regardless of whether you have a Base Set 2 Charizard, Blaine's Charizard, or a Shining Charizard.

Shining Pokémon

During the Neo series, from 2000 to 2001, Pokémon introduced one of the most iconic series of variant Pokémon called "Shining." The "Shining Collection" consists of twenty cards available through packs, and one card available as a promo. Regardless of condition, these cards tend to evoke interest from collectors for their extremely low population, and unique printing style, featuring textured gold accents on the illustration.

Southern Island Cards

This was a special mini-set of cards released in 2001 to promote the second Pokémon movie. This set was distributed through two different promotional folders, each holding each halves of a complete 18 card set. Though not all of these promos are widely sought, complete sets of these cards can go for hundreds of dollars.

How to Appraise and Sell Your Collection

Once you take some time to learn about the cards that you have and what their potential value might be, you might find it's time to sell.

If you are not an experienced trading card reseller, I would highly discourage you from selling cards directly to consumers. There are many risks that come into play when selling cards online, including inaccurate listings, condition disputes, and the possibility of unintentionally selling fake cards, which might be hard to spot without the knowledge and experience to authenticate cards yourself.

Selling cards online also requires a significant time commitment, shipping and packaging costs, and listing fees that might leave you feeling discouraged if you don't have the process and infrastructure needed to mitigate these factors.

Working With a Local Dealer

I would recommend selling your collection to a dealer in your area. These folks dedicate a significant portion of their time to buying and reselling Pokémon cards on a professional or semi-professional level, and they may be interested in acquiring your collection.

However, it's important to understand that the dealer's motivation is to resell your cards at a profit, so they will often offer about half the market value of your cards, considering the condition of your collection. But consider this as a convenience fee for selling your cards without having to seek out and render service to dozens or hundreds of buyers.

There are a ton of hidden costs and hours of labor behind the market values you see on popular websites. Even if your cards are in impeccable condition, if you approach a dealer, understand that they need to compensate themselves for the labor of selling the cards despite the costs inherent to selling, and those considerations will impact how much they are able to offer you.

Estimate the Value of Your Cards Before Negotiating With the Dealer

By simply understanding the rough value of your cards before meeting with a dealer, and understanding their motivations and limitations, you can manage your expectations and negotiate with dealers more effectively, to ensure you're getting the best value possible.

Best of luck, and happy hunting for your old collection!

Источник: https://hobbylark.com

As my partner and I were preparing to move in together, earlier this spring, she pulled out a box of Pokémon cards she had held on to since she was a kid in the ’90s.

“Want to see if these are worth anything?” she asked me offhandedly.

We’d heard that Pokémon was making a comeback. Vintage Charizard cards were going for thousands of dollars: last year, YouTuber Logan Paul bought one for $150,000 while rapper Logic reportedly paid $220,574 for the same version (all figures US).

I took out the stack of a few dozen cards, stored all these years in a decoupage tin and mixed with other tokens of the era—buttons and pieces of cardboard bearing Sailor Mercury’s likeness—and, one by one, started to search for them on pricing websites.

The first few queries yielded expected results for twenty-year-old childhood relics: $5 here, $7 there. Then I picked up one card featuring a holographic image of the turtle-like Blastoise. This little monster was among the most iconic Pokémon—the final evolution of one of the three starters players can choose from in the classic Game Boy game. If any of the cards was going to be worth something, it was this one.

I typed its name and number into the search bar, and when the results appeared, I dropped the card in shock. Of the first five listings that appeared for the Blastoise, the lowest was a cool $820. And if we had the coveted first-edition version? A professionally graded mint-quality copy was going for nearly $50,000.

A quick glance at its price history showed me that this piece of shiny cardboard that my girlfriend had ferried around from crappy apartment to crappy apartment was not only pricey but, thanks to a global pandemic that had renewed interest in collectible cards, more valuable than ever.

Pokémon may forever be associated with the schoolyards of the ’90s, but trading cards have been around for much longer. In the late nineteenth century, the original “trade cards” were inserted into the backs of cigarette packs and functioned as both advertisements for businesses or products and stiffeners for extra protection. Since they often featured amusing cartoon-like images, people began collecting them in scrapbooks. Sports cards—mainly for baseball—quickly followed suit.

Trading-card games, however, are a relatively new phenomenon. In 1991, mathematician Richard Garfield was challenged by his friend, Wizards of the Coast founder Peter Adkison, to combine the popularity of baseball cards with a board game. The idea was for players to accumulate a collection of various cards to build a deck and play with. Two years later, Garfield launched Magic: The Gathering—widely recognized as the first trading-card game—which quickly sold out after its first run and spawned the creation of other beloved games, including Pokémon and Yu-Gi-Oh, in the late ’90s.

People of all ages still play these tabletop games, but a blossoming secondary collectors’ market has emerged, particularly for the acquisition of rare vintage cards from the original print runs.

Last year, eBay reported that there were over 4 million more trading cards sold on the platform than in 2019, with Pokémon sales increasing by 574 percent. Outside of eBay, professional auction sites are pulling in record sales of vintage sports and trading cards nearly every month. At one of those auctions this June, an autographed Tom Brady rookie card was listed for $750,000 and, after a manic thirty-two-bid war, was eventually sold to an anonymous buyer for over $3.1 million—a price some might consider a steal compared with the NBA and MLB cards that sold over the past year for $5.2 million each.

The collector frenzy isn’t just happening online. While other brick-and-mortar retailers suffered under the weight of COVID-19—the Canadian Federation of Independent Business estimates that one in six small businesses could close due to the pandemic—game stores saw their sales surge.

Dylan Kirkup, the e-commerce manager at Toronto’s 401 Games, which buys and resells old trading cards, says sales of products like Pokémon cards doubled and even tripled over the course of 2020. “Other businesses were seeing a lot of the negative effects of the pandemic and these lockdowns,” he says. “We found ourselves on the exact opposite end of that spectrum.”

When my girlfriend purchased her small Pokémon collection as an eight-year-old in 1999, she was more interested in the pretty pictures of her favourite characters than in actually playing the game. But that half-hearted interest—coupled with her hesitation to throw things away—paid off. The same millennials who collected those cards as kids but didn’t hold on to them are now adults with jobs and money to spend, and since social activities, travel, and big-ticket expenses have been largely on pause, it makes sense that some people would invest those excess funds into collectible cardboard.

From some quick internet research, I learned that our high-priced collectible was even more valuable because it was from the first Pokémon card set ever printed, commonly known as the base set. Cards from the first run of that set bear a fancy little “first edition” stamp on the left-hand side, and those are the highest valued, netting auction prices of hundreds of thousands of dollars. This March, a first-edition Charizard broke a record as the most expensive Pokémon card ever sold, racking up $399,750 on Goldin Auctions. Our card was from the second run of that first set—commonly known as “shadowless” because the card’s image box doesn’t have a drop shadow behind it like on later printings. Shadowless cards are not as rare as first-edition cards, but they’re a lot more rare—and expensive—than other cards from the base set.

Zack Browning is an expert in the minute details that make these types of cards so valuable. The Chicago-based card collector boasts one of the most expansive Pokémon collections in the world, which he estimates is worth somewhere between $3 and $5 million and which includes mint-condition versions of nearly every card from the vintage ’90s era. Browning started collecting cards as a kid, when his grandmother would gift him packs. But, when he became an adult, it became a part-time pursuit.

“When I left college, I started making a little bit of money, and I wanted to spend some of it on what I enjoyed as a kid, so I went and bought some Pokémon cards and started building sets,” he says. “It’s developed into this massive pursuit, but that was never initially the goal . . . . I’ve helped many, many others follow their passions and find their own childhood collections.”

As it turns out, nostalgia is a valuable commodity. According to research by Le Moyne College psychologist Krystine Batcho, our attraction to the past increases during times of great instability or change—like, say, a global pandemic. She has found that people with greater propensities for nostalgia are better able to cope with adversity and turmoil.

“One of the most important aspects of being a healthy human being is having a sense that you are in control of things,” Batcho said during a 2019 interview with the American Psychological Association. “When things start to change . . . it’s comforting to have a nostalgic feeling for the past that reminds us that, although we don’t know what the future is going to bring, what we do know is that we know who we have been and who we really are.”

While COVID-19 may have spurred the renewed interest in collectibles, Browning predicts that these cards will become even more valuable as the millennials who first drove the craze in the ’90s earn more money to put toward recapturing their schoolyard obsessions. As time passes, he says, people tend to feel more nostalgic for their childhoods—a longing soothed, perhaps, by holding a shadowless Blastoise or a Tom Brady rookie card in their hands. And they’ll always pay a premium for that.

While I was tempted to hold on to the Blastoise in the hope that our descendants could make thousands off it in a few decades, we ultimately decided to sell the card. On a crisp March day in a Vancouver park, I met a man from one of the many Facebook Marketplace groups I joined this year. I’d listed the card for what felt like a reasonable deal considering its slightly roughed-up condition compared with similar ones I saw on eBay, and he ended up offering me around $300 for it.

Between that and the money I made from selling some dozen other cards we’d pulled out of the closet, my girlfriend and I netted enough for a new couch, which in our current life is more useful than being able to relive our pasts.

When I handed off the card in the park, the guy’s eyes lit up. I asked him what he planned to do with it—if he would go to the trouble of professionally grading it to resell to some other collector down the line or keep it long-term for his own nostalgia.

He said he might keep it for his kids to have in twenty years, so they could see what his childhood was like.

Mel Woods

Mel Woods

Mel Woods is a Vancouver-based writer and audio producer, and a staff writer at Xtra Magazine. Their work has appeared in HuffPost Canada, Vice, Slate, The Tyee, and the Globe and Mail.

Mathias Ball

Mathias Ball

Mathias Ball is an illustrator from a little town along the coast of Lake Huron. Their work has appeared in Reader's Digest, the Washington Post, the New York Times, and more.

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Источник: https://thewalrus.ca/gotta-catch-em-all-why-old-pokemon-cards-are-suddenly-worth-thousands/

10 of the Most Valuable Pokémon Cards

As a teenager, Pokémon creator Satoshi Tajiri was so fond of collecting insects that classmates called him “Mr. Bug.” While it might not have been an affectionate label, Tajiri had the last laugh: His Pokémon video game, originally released for the Nintendo Game Boy in 1996, has become an enduring multimedia success, selling billions in games, merchandise, and phone apps.

The goal of collecting and pitting monsters against one another has been particularly appealing for trading card collectors, who have created an entire secondary market for the low-tech version of the game. The all-time sales record as of May 2021 might be this Blastoise card sold at auction for a whopping $360,000, but it's not a card you ever would have found in a pack. Wizards of the Coast, which manufactures the card game, printed just one to show to Nintendo.

Fortunately, other cards are a little more accessible, though first editions, misprints, and other characteristics all affect value. If you’re curious, take a look at 10 of the most valuable Pokémon cards according to Heritage Auctions, eBay, and other sources.

1. Pikachu Illustrator // $250,000

One of the earliest cards to come out of the Pokémon franchise was this promotional card of Pikachu that was given out to winners of an illustration contest in 1998. An estimated 20 to 39 copies were issued. In late 2016, Heritage Auctions sold one for a whopping $54,970. In July 2020, a card graded by Professional Sports Authenticator (PSA) as a 9 out of 10 fetched $250,000.

2. Shadowless Holo Charizard // $507,000

This dragon-esque creature was first seen in 1999. More than 20 years later, a PSA 10 card sold for a whopping $507,000 on eBay.

3. Master's Key Prize Card // $22,000

Given out during a 2010 card championship in Japan, only 34 copies of the Master's Key Prize Card are thought to exist. The scarcity helps the cards command a high price when they hit the market. One ungraded card sold for $22,000 in November 2019.

4. Pre-Release Raichu // $10,000

Collectors love cards that were never intended for public distribution, and this Raichu card fits the bill. Although unconfirmed, Pokémon lore has it that product distributor Wizards of the Coast made just 10 of these Raichu cards for their employees and stamped “pre-release” on the front. While it’s rarely offered for sale, collectors believe it can fetch up to $10,000.

5. Tropical Wind Tropical Mega Battle // $70,000

Another card that was given only to winners at a tournament—in this case, the 1999 Tropical Mega Battle Pokémon World Championship in Honolulu, Hawaii—the Tropical Wind card is believed to have just 14 PSA 9 cards in circulation. One sold for $70,000.

6. Espeon Gold Star// $22,100

This 2007 character card graded PSA 10 sold for $22,100 on eBay recently. An NFT (non-fungible token) version sold for $28,285.

7. Blastoise // $20,000

This combat turtle from 1999 was put up in a perfect condition PSA 10 and sold for $20,000.

8. Shining Gyarados // $12,000

This 2001 Neo Revelations card brought in $12,000 on eBay.

9. Giovanni's Scheme // $10,100

Never released in English, this 2017 Japanese card is highly sought after by collectors. A perfect PSA 10 card sold for $10,100 on eBay.

10. Umbreon Holo // $5150

This 2003 card sold for $5150 after buyers took notice of its PSA 10 status.

A version of this story ran in 2017; it has been updated for 2021.

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Источник: https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/502831/5-most-valuable-pokemon-cards

The Five Most Valuable Charizard Pokemon Cards Money Can Buy

Pokemon card

Pokemon has been around since 1996, and they are here to stay. While Ash and his companion Picachu are unquestionably the best-known characters in the Poke-verse, Charizard is a close second. The giant orange dragon’s firey mistakes and extraordinary powers have led him to be a fan favorite. Not only is he a popular staple on the TV series, often ordered plush, and well-loved video game character, but his trading cards also see a lot of use. For collectors, a Gem Mint Charizard is the grail of all finds. Here are the five most valuable Charizard Pokemon cards money can buy.

5. 2002 Neo Destiny Shining Charizard Pokémon Card Holographic #107: $22,700

Looking at the 2002 Neo Destiny Shining Charizard, you will immediately notice the character on the card. Not only is this the obvious focal point, but it’s holographic while the background is not. Typically the reverse is true, with a matte character sitting on a holo-background. This unusual reverse setup was an innovation of Wizards of the Coast. PSA Collector points out that these highly sought-after cards represent the last year Wizards of the Coast used the First Edition logo. Furthermore, this is the last set out of the four Neo sets they released. The population report shows a mere hundred and eighty-four of these cards in perfect Gem Mint condition. However, only around four hundred and forty have even been sent for grading, and most of those were play-damaged.

4. 2003 Skyridge Holographic Crystal Charizard: $25,100

Lauded for its unusual pale background and almost three-dimensional style of artwork, the 2003 Skyridge Holographic Crystal Charizard is the most recently printed out of the five most valuable Charizardcards in the world today. These particular fire-types are so rare, especially in good or mint condition, because of how often they saw play in real life. The fire-types are the tanks of the Pokemon world. All fire-type characters can decimate opponents with damage so long as the player has enough energy to spend. However, in particular, Charizard was and remains one of the most powerful damage dealers in any Pokemon TCG deck. A truly formidable opponent, this firebreather often deals more damage than almost any other single card, making it a highly desirable card to have in a deck used for play. This dragon-like creature’s popularity boost is thanks to being featured on the TV show; there aren’t many left to collect. All the Pokemon that regularly feature on any of the cartoon series tend to be more popular simply because they are well known.

3. 1999 Holographic 1st Edition Base Set Charizard #4: $36,000

Like the current list-topper, this card was once the most expensive Charizard ever sold. Despite its losing that status, thirty-six thousand dollars is still a substantial sum of money for what is essentially a piece of thin cardboard with printing on it. Appearances can be deceptive, and materials aren’t everything. Price and value aren’t the same, though the former is a reflection of the latter. The value in an item is all in how much significance we bestow on it and what we are willing to exchange it for as a result. For example, getting a card authenticated and graded places value in it. Specifically, this service is worth at least eighteen to thirty-five dollars plus shipping for a Pokemon card, even if the card came in a multipack and was on sale for a dollar.

2. 1996 Japanese Base Set Charizard (No Rarity Symbol): $57,877

Just as coin collectors place particular value on coins that are misprinted, so do card collectors. A rare or old item is valuable, but one with minor cosmetic flaws from the factory, which few or no other copies possess, is truly unique. The 1996 Japanese Base Set Charizard with no rarity symbol is one of these unusual cases. Additionally, the copy of this card that sold at this price was in PSA 10 condition. As cards age, it is increasingly rare for them to achieve this distinction unless they’re kept in untouched protective cases. A single bend, wrinkle, or factory flaw that isn’t a misprint, like being slightly off-center, will prevent the card from gaining this label. Additionally, as PSA explains on its site he grading is also subjective for the graders who must make judgment calls on specific aspects of card condition and appeal.

1. Shadowless Charizard, With PSA 10 Gem Mint Rating: $311,800

Charizard has always held a special place in Pokemon history and fans’ hearts. However, for card collectors and those who play the trading card game, this particular Charizard is important in two different ways. Firstly, it was a very high-powered card for play. If you had one of these in your deck and hand, it didn’t guarantee a win, but it helped a lot. Considering the popularity of this high-powered card for playing with, that’s unusual. Most copies of this card are weathered. Secondly, this Mitsuhiro Arita-designed Shadowless 1st Edition Holo Variant has a perfect ten in Gem Mint Rating. Not only is the card made by an exceptional and well-loved artist, but this specific copy is pristine. Resultantly, only a single copy sold for over three hundred thousand dollars to a collector on eBay. Over two and a half thousand were submitted for rating, and less than a hundred and fifty achieved a ten. As NintendoLife News puts it, “…in other words, it’s the rarest version of the card ever released, and in the best condition it could possibly be in.”

Final Thoughts

Whether you love Charizard because you grew up watching him on TV, or you’re a TCG card collector who adores an ultra-rare find, any of these five cards would make your collection complete. Players of the Pokemon trading card game always have favorites, but these cards aren’t meant for playing casual games. If you have one of the cards on this list in good condition, pack it up now. The value isn’t going down any time soon.

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Источник: https://moneyinc.com/most-valuable-charizard-pokemon-cards/