yahoo com usa

Yahoo Japan Corp.'s Corporate page provides careers information,About Us. Over the next few weeks, we will be dropping the "Yahoo" brand and will Verizon Small Business Essentials' platform has enabled us to grow to over 100. Let Us Roam in the Internet Managing messages Inbox, Drafts, Spam, Sent, Yahoo! Mail automatically deletes messages in the Trash folder when we log in.

: Yahoo com usa

Yahoo com usa
Yahoo com usa
TARGET VISA BILL PAY ONLINE
Yahoo com usa

Yahoo com usa -

Yahoo!

American web portal

This article is about the web portal. For the search function, see Yahoo! Search. For the now-unaffiliated Japanese company, see Yahoo! Japan. For other uses, see Yahoo (disambiguation).

Yahoo (, styled as yahoo!)[7][8] is an American web services provider. It is headquartered in Sunnyvale, California and operated by the namesake company Yahoo! Inc., which is 90% owned by investment funds managed by Apollo Global Management and 10% by Verizon Communications.

It provides a web portal, search engineYahoo Search, and related services, including My Yahoo!, Yahoo Mail, Yahoo News, Yahoo Finance, Yahoo Sports and its advertising platform, Yahoo! Native.

Yahoo was established by Jerry Yang and David Filo in January 1994 and was one of the pioneers of the early Internet era in the 1990s.[9] In 2000, it was the most popular website worldwide.[10] Usage declined in the late 2000s as it lost market share to Google.[11][12] However, Yahoo domain websites are still among the most popular websites, ranking 12th in global engagement according to both Alexa Internet[13] and SimilarWeb.[14]

History

Main article: History of Yahoo!

See also: Timeline of Yahoo!

Founding

The Yahoo home page in 1994, when it was a directory. A search enginewas added in 1995.

In January 1994, Yang and Filo were electrical engineering graduate students at Stanford University, when they created a website named "Jerry and David's guide to the World Wide Web".[15][16][17][18] The site was a human-edited web directory, organized in a hierarchy, as opposed to a searchable index of pages. In March 1994, "Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web" was renamed "Yahoo!" and became known as the Yahoo Directory.[19][20][21][22][23] The "yahoo.com" domain was registered on January 18, 1995.[24]

The word "yahoo" is a backronym for "Yet Another Hierarchically Organized Oracle"[25] or "Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle".[26] The term "hierarchical" described how the Yahoo database was arranged in layers of subcategories. The term "oracle" was intended to mean "source of truth and wisdom", and the term "officious", rather than being related to the word's normal meaning, described the many office workers who would use the Yahoo database while surfing from work.[27] However, Filo and Yang insist they mainly selected the name because they liked the slang definition of a "yahoo" (used by college students in David Filo's native Louisiana in the late 1980s and early 1990s to refer to an unsophisticated, rural Southerner): "rude, unsophisticated, uncouth."[28] This meaning derives from the Yahoo race of fictional beings from Gulliver's Travels.

Yahoo was incorporated on March 2, 1995. In 1995, a search engine function, called Yahoo Search, was introduced. This allowed users to search Yahoo Directory.[29][30] Yahoo soon became the first popular online directory and search engine on the World Wide Web.[31]

Expansion

Map showing localized versions of Yahoo! web portals, as of 2008

Yahoo grew rapidly throughout the 1990s. Yahoo became a public company via an initial public offering in April 1996 and its stock price rose 600% within two years.[32] Like many search engines and web directories, Yahoo added a web portal, putting it in competition with services including Excite, Lycos, and America Online.[33] By 1998, Yahoo was the most popular starting point for web users,[34] and the human-edited Yahoo Directory the most popular search engine,[22] receiving 95 million page views per day, triple that of rival Excite.[32] It also made many high-profile acquisitions. Yahoo began offering free e-mail from October 1997 after the acquisition of RocketMail, which was then renamed to Yahoo Mail.[35] In 1998, Yahoo replaced AltaVista as the crawler-based search engine underlying the Directory with Inktomi.[36] Yahoo's two biggest acquisitions were made in 1999: Geocities for $3.6 billion[37] and Broadcast.com for $5.7 billion.[38]

Its stock price skyrocketed during the dot-com bubble, closing at an all-time high of $118.75/share on January 3, 2000. However, after the dot-com bubble burst, it reached a post-bubble low of $8.11 on September 26, 2001.[39]

Yahoo began using Google for search in June 2000.[40][41] Over the next four years, it developed its own search technologies, which it began using in 2004 partly using technology from its $280 million acquisition of Inktomi in 2002.[42] In response to Google's Gmail, Yahoo began to offer unlimited email storage in 2007. In 2008, the company laid off hundreds of people as it struggled from competition.[43]

Yahoo headquarters in 2001

In February 2008, Microsoft made an unsolicited bid to acquire Yahoo for $44.6 billion.[44][45] Yahoo rejected the bid, claiming that it "substantially undervalues" the company and was not in the interest of its shareholders. Although Microsoft increased its bid to $47 billion, Yahoo insisted on another 10%+ increase to the offer and Microsoft cancelled the offer in May 2008.[46][47][48][49]

Carol Bartz, who had no previous experience in Internet advertising, replaced Yang as CEO in January 2009.[50][51] In September 2011, after failing to meet targets, she was fired by chairman Roy J. Bostock; CFO Tim Morse was named as Interim CEO of the company.[52][53]

In April 2012, after the appointment of Scott Thompson as CEO, several key executives resigned, including chief product officerBlake Irving.[54][55] On April 4, 2012, Yahoo announced 2,000 layoffs,[56] or about 14% of its 14,100 workers by the end of year, expected to save around $375 million annually.[57] In an email sent to employees in April 2012, Thompson reiterated his view that customers should come first at Yahoo. He also completely reorganized the company.[58]

On May 13, 2012, Thompson was fired and was replaced on an interim basis by Ross Levinsohn, recently appointed head of Yahoo's new Media group. Several associates of Third Point Management, including Daniel S. Loeb were nominated to the board of directors.[59][58][60][61] Thompson's total compensation for his 130-day tenure with Yahoo was at least $7.3 million.[62]

On July 15, 2012, Marissa Mayer was appointed president and CEO of Yahoo, effective July 17, 2012.[63][64]

In June 2013, Yahoo acquired blogging site Tumblr for $1.1 billion in cash, with Tumblr's CEO and founder David Karp continuing to run the site.[65][66][67][68] In July 2013, Yahoo announced plans to open an office in San Francisco.[69]

On August 2, 2013, Yahoo acquired Rockmelt; its staff was retained, but all of its existing products were terminated.[70]

Data collated by comScore during July 2013 revealed that, during the month, more people in the U.S. visited Yahoo websites than Google; the first time that Yahoo outperformed Google since 2011.[71] The data did not count mobile usage, nor Tumblr.[72]

Mayer also hired Katie Couric to be the anchor of a new online news operation and started an online food magazine. However, by January 2014, doubts about Mayer's progress emerged when Mayer fired her own first major hire, Henrique de Castro.[73]

On December 12, 2014, Yahoo acquired video advertising provider BrightRoll for $583 million.[74]

On November 21, 2014, Yahoo acquired Cooliris.[75]

Decline, security breaches, and sale

Main article: Yahoo! data breaches

By December 2015, Mayer was criticized as performance declined.[76][77][78][79] Mayer was ranked as the least likable CEO in tech.[80][81]

On February 2, 2016, Mayer announced layoffs amounting to 15% of the Yahoo! workforce.[82]

On July 25, 2016, Verizon Communications announced the acquisition of Yahoo's core Internet business for $4.83 billion.[83][84][85][86] The deal excluded Yahoo's 15% stake in Alibaba Group and 35.5% stake in Yahoo Japan.[87][88]

On February 21, 2017, as a result of the Yahoo data breaches, Verizon lowered its purchase price for Yahoo by $350 million and reached an agreement to share liabilities regarding the data breaches.[89][90]

On June 13, 2017, Verizon completed the acquisition of Yahoo and Marissa Mayer resigned.[91][92]

Yahoo, AOL, and HuffPost were to continue operating under their own names, under the umbrella of a new company, Oath Inc., later called Verizon Media.[93][94]

The parts of the original Yahoo! Inc. which were not purchased by Verizon Communications were renamed Altaba, which later liquidated, making a final distribution in October 2020.[95]

In September 2021, investment funds managed by Apollo Global Management acquired 90% of Yahoo.[3][96]

In November 2021, Yahoo announced that it was ceasing its operations in mainland China due to an increasingly challenging business and legal environment.[97]

Chief Executive Officers

Products and services

For a list of all current and defunct services offered by Yahoo, see List of Yahoo-owned sites and services.

Data breaches

Main article: Yahoo! data breaches

On September 22, 2016, Yahoo disclosed a data breach that occurred in late 2014, in which information associated with at least 500 million user accounts,[99][100] one of the largest breaches reported to date.[101] The United States indicted four men, including two employees of Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), for their involvement in the hack.[102][103] On December 14, 2016, the company revealed that another separate data breach had occurred in 2014, with hackers obtaining sensitive account information, including security questions, to at least one billion accounts.[104] The company stated that hackers had utilized stolen internal software to forge HTTP cookies.[105][106]

On October 3, 2017, the company stated that all 3 billion of its user accounts were affected by the August 2013 theft.[107][108][109][110][111]

Criticism

Main article: Criticism of Yahoo!

DMCA notice to whistleblower

On November 30, 2009, Yahoo was criticized by the Electronic Frontier Foundation for sending a DMCA notice to whistleblower website "Cryptome" for publicly posting details, prices, and procedures on obtaining private information pertaining to Yahoo's subscribers.[112]

Censorship of private emails affiliated with Occupy Wall Street protests

After some concerns over censorship of private emails regarding a website affiliated with Occupy Wall Street protests were raised, Yahoo responded with an apology and explained it as an accident.[113][114][115]

The 2015 DublinLGBTQ Pride Festival, sponsored by Yahoo

On September 11, 2001, Yahoo! announced its partnership with FIFA for the 2002 FIFA World Cup and 2006 FIFA World Cup tournaments. It was one of FIFA's 15 partners at the tournaments. The deal included co-branding the organization's websites.[116]

Yahoo! sponsored the 2012 Sundance Film Festival.[117]

Logos and themes

The first Yahoo logo was established upon foundation of the company in 1994. It consists of the "Yahoo" wordmark which is colored black and is using the Times New Roman font, but it was later changed.

In March 1995, when the company changed its name to Yahoo, it introduced another logo which is briefly changed to a more elaborate text that includes an exclamation point at the end.

In August 1995, Yahoo changed its logo to a stylized yellow jumping "Y" figurine on a blue circle while the "Yahoo!" wordmark is written below.

On January 1, 1996, Yahoo introduced a simplified new logo that included the text "Yahoo" and an exclamation mark, both in red with a slight shadow behind the text.[118]

Yahoo! sign with address at its headquarters in 2007; it always used a purple sign despite the website itself having the red variant

By May 2009, Yahoo tweaked the logo by recoloring it from red to purple and removing the logo's outline and shadow. At the time, the purple logo was accompanied by a new slogan, "It's Y!ou." A shortened variant of the logo, consisting of only the letter "Y" and an exclamation point, was also used.[119]

On August 7, 2013, at around midnight EDT, Yahoo announced that the final version of the new logo would be revealed on September 5, 2013, at 4:00 a.m. UTC. In the period leading up to the unveiling of the new logo, the "30 Days of Change" campaign was introduced, whereby a variation of the logo was published every day for the 30 days following the announcement.[120][121] The new logo was eventually launched with an accompanying video that showed its digital construction, and Mayer published a personalized description of the design process on her Tumblr page.[122] Mayer explains:

So, one weekend this summer, I rolled up my sleeves and dove into the trenches with our logo design team ... We spent the majority of Saturday and Sunday designing the logo from start to finish, and we had a ton of fun weighing every minute detail. We knew we wanted a logo that reflected Yahoo – whimsical, yet sophisticated. Modern and fresh, with a nod to our history. Having a human touch, personal. Proud.[123]

A Yahoo-branded PC keyboard

On September 19, 2013, Yahoo launched a new version of the "My Yahoo" personalized homepage. The redesign allows users to tailor a homepage with widgets that access features such as email accounts, calendars, Flickr and other Yahoo content, and Internet content. Users can also select "theme packs" that represent artists such as Polly Apfelbaum and Alec Monopoly, and bands such as Empire of the Sun.[124] Mayer then explained at a conference in late September 2013 that the logo change was the result of feedback from both external parties and employees.[125]

In September 2019 Yahoo changed its logo again for a "refreshed brand identity [that] is simpler and more flexible, and looks back to the original, quirky 1996 logo." The logo is a white text set against a purple background, with both the “y” and “!” of the logo reportedly set at an angle of 22.5 degrees. The logo was designed by Pentagram.[126]

  • Wordmark used from January 1, 1996, to September 4, 2013 (shown: purple variant used from 2009); red version still used by Yahoo! Japan

  • Yahoo's fifth and previous logo, September 2013–September 2019

  • Yahoo's sixth and current logo, September 2019–present

See also

References

  1. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K, Annual Report, Filing Date Mar 1, 2017". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  2. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-Q, Quarterly Report, Filing Date May 9, 2017". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  3. ^ abMihalcik, Carrie (September 1, 2021). "Yahoo has a new owner, again". CNET.
  4. ^"Verizon Communications, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 16, 2017"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  5. ^"Verizon Communications, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 27, 2017"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  6. ^"Verizon and all new Oath Inc. Story of Yahoo, AOL and Altaba – FlatFur Media". flatfur.com. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  7. ^Yahoo Commercial 2006 on YouTube
  8. ^Yahoo 'Flashing Lights' Commercial (1080p) on YouTube
  9. ^"Yahoo's Sale to Verizon Ends an Era for a Web Pioneer". The New York Times. July 25, 2016. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  10. ^Saurel, Sylvain (August 17, 2019). "6 Reasons Why Yahoo! Failed". Medium.
  11. ^McGoogan, Cara (July 25, 2016). "Yahoo: 9 reasons for the internet icon's decline". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 4, 2018.
  12. ^"The Glory That Was Yahoo". March 21, 2018.
  13. ^"Yahoo.com Traffic, Demographics and Competitors – Alexa". www.alexa.com.
  14. ^"Yahoo.com Analytics - Market Share Data". SimilarWeb.
  15. ^"Yahoo! Inc. – Company Timeline". Archived from the original on July 13, 2008. Retrieved July 19, 2016.. yhoo.client.shareholder.com
  16. ^Clark, Andrew (February 1, 2008). "How Jerry's guide to the world wide web became Yahoo". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved May 23, 2012.
  17. ^"Yahoo! celebrates 20th anniversary". Yahoo! News. March 1, 2015. Archived from the original on January 13, 2016.
  18. ^Romano, Andrew (March 1, 2015). "At 20, Yahoo celebrates and looks ahead". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on March 27, 2016.
  19. ^Clark, Andrew (February 1, 2008). "How Jerry's guide to the world wide web became Yahoo". The Guardian.
  20. ^Thomson, David G. (2006). Blueprint to a Billion. Wiley-Interscience. p. 155. ISBN .
  21. ^Trex, Ethan. "Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web becomes Yahoo!". Blogs.static.mentalfloss.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2010. Retrieved August 24, 2010.
  22. ^ abThe Yahoo Directory — Once The Internet’s Most Important Search Engine — Is To CloseArchived June 11, 2017, at the Wayback Machine September 26, 2014, retrieved in June 3, 2017
  23. ^Yahoo schließt seinen KatalogArchived May 18, 2017, at the Wayback Machine from golem.de, September 27, 2014, retrieved in June 3, 2017
  24. ^"This Day in History, January 18, 2017". CNBC. January 18, 2017.
  25. ^Gaffin, Adam (September 11, 1995). "Hello, Is Anyone Out There?". Network World.
  26. ^Gil, Paul (April 19, 2021). "What Does "Yahoo" Stand For?". Lifewire.
  27. ^Gurnitsky, Joanna. "What Does 'Yahoo' Stand For?". About.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  28. ^"The History of Yahoo! – How It All Started ..." Yahoo!. January 9, 2011. Archived from the original on January 9, 2011.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  29. ^Oppitz, Marcus; Tomsu, Peter (2017). Inventing the Cloud Century: How Cloudiness Keeps Changing Our Life, Economy and Technology. Springer Science+Business Media. p. 238. ISBN .
  30. ^"Yahoo! Search". Yahoo!. November 28, 1996. Archived from the original on November 28, 1996. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  31. ^"What is first mover?". SearchCIO. TechTarget. September 2005. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  32. ^ ab"Yahoo! The kingmaker – Jul. 23, 1998".
  33. ^"AOL/Netscape merger presses smaller portals – Nov. 25, 1998".
  34. ^"Yahoo! still first portal call". BBC News. June 5, 1998. Archived from the original on November 24, 2017.
  35. ^"Yahoo! To Acquire Four11 Corporation" (Press release). October 8, 1997.
  36. ^"Yahoo! Still first portal call". BBC News. June 5, 1998.
  37. ^"Yahoo! buys GeoCities". CNN. January 28, 1999.
  38. ^"Yahoo to buy Broadcast.com for $5.7B". CNN. April 1, 1999.
  39. ^Linder, Karen (May 8, 2012). The Women of Berkshire Hathaway. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. p. 199. ISBN .
  40. ^Naughton, John (July 2, 2000). "Why's Yahoo gone to Google? Search me". The Guardian.
  41. ^"Yahoo! Selects Google As Its Default Search Engine Provider" (Press release). Altaba. June 26, 2000.
  42. ^"Yahoo dumps Google search technology".
  43. ^Helft, Miguel (January 22, 2008). "Hundreds of Layoffs Expected at Yahoo". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 28, 2016.
  44. ^Isidore, Chris (February 1, 2008). "Microsoft bids $45 billion for Yahoo". CNN.
  45. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 425, Filing Date Feb 1, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  46. ^Swartz, Jon (May 6, 2008). "Microsoft drops pursuit of Yahoo, looks ahead". USA Today.
  47. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 16, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  48. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 12, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  49. ^"Yahoo rejects Microsoft approach". BBC News. February 11, 2008. Archived from the original on February 14, 2008. Retrieved February 17, 2008.
  50. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jan 15, 2009". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  51. ^"Job cuts help Yahoo! profits surge". BBC News. October 21, 2009. Archived from the original on May 11, 2011. Retrieved May 31, 2011.
  52. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Sep 7, 2011"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  53. ^"Yahoo reels as CEO Carol Bartz fired on the phone in sudden shake-up at floundering tech giant". NY Daily News. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 22, 2018.
  54. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K/A, Filing Date Apr 27, 2012"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  55. ^Swisher, Kara (April 5, 2012). "Exclusive: Yahoo's Chief Product Officer Blake Irving Resigns". All Things D. Archived from the original on January 4, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  56. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Apr 4, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  57. ^Liedtke, Michael (April 4, 2012). "Yahoo dumping 2,000 workers in latest purge". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on June 16, 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2012.
  58. ^ abSwisher, Kara (April 10, 2012). "It's Official: Yahoo Reorgs Itself Just Like We Said (Memo Time!)". All Things D. Archived from the original on December 20, 2012.
  59. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 14, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  60. ^"Yahoo! Names Fred Amoroso Chairman and Appoints Ross Levinsohn Interim CEO" (Press release). Yahoo!. May 13, 2012. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  61. ^Oreskovic, Alexei (May 10, 2012). "Yahoo CEO says he never provided a resume-source". Reuters. Archived from the original on July 26, 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2012.
  62. ^Pepitone, Julianne (May 14, 2012). "Ousted Yahoo CEO will get no severance". CNN. Archived from the original on May 17, 2012.
  63. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 19, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  64. ^Matt McGee, Search Engine Land. "Confirmed: Marissa Mayer Leaving Google For Yahoo CEO RoleArchived March 28, 2017, at the Wayback Machine." July 16, 2012 . Retrieved March 27, 2017.
  65. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 20, 2013"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  66. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 20, 2013"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  67. ^Lublin, Joann S.; Efrati, Amir; Ante, Spencer E. (May 19, 2013). "Yahoo Deal Shows Power Shift". The Wall Street Journal. New York. Archived from the original on February 3, 2015. Retrieved May 20, 2013.
  68. ^"Yahoo to buy Tumblr – reports". 3 News NZ. May 20, 2013. Archived from the original on October 8, 2017. Retrieved October 8, 2017.
  69. ^Yahoo Plans Splashy New San Francisco Digs (and Neon Billboard Dreams) – Kara Swisher – NewsArchived July 28, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. AllThingsD (July 26, 2013). Retrieved on August 16, 2013.
  70. ^"Yahoo Has Acquired Rockmelt, Apps To Shut Down On August 31st". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  71. ^Hicken, Melanie (August 21, 2013). "Yahoo beats Google in traffic for first time in 2 years". CNN. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018.
  72. ^
  73. ^GOEL, VINDU; MILLER, CLAIRE CAIN (January 16, 2014). "Bumps on a Road to Revival for Yahoo". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 24, 2014.
  74. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K, Annual Report, Filing Date Feb 27, 2015". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  75. ^By TechCrunch "[1]Archived July 6, 2017, at the Wayback Machine."
  76. ^McGregor, Jenna (December 7, 2015). "Scrutiny on Yahoo's Marissa Mayer grows more intense". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  77. ^Todd, Deborah M. (December 5, 2015). "Yahoo board in final talks on future of company". Reuters.
  78. ^Campos, Rodrigo (December 2, 2015). "With buyback help, Yahoo stock has soared under Mayer". Reuters. Archived from the original on December 6, 2015.
  79. ^Goliya, Kshitiz; Nayak, Malathi (December 7, 2015). "Verizon could explore Yahoo's Internet business, CFO says". Reuters. Archived from the original on December 9, 2015.
  80. ^Mejia, Zameena (May 31, 2017). "Why Marissa Mayer is the 'least likable' CEO in tech". CNBC.
  81. ^"The rise and fall of Marissa Mayer, the once-beloved CEO of Yahoo now pursuing her own venture". Business Insider. February 11, 2020.
  82. ^Kasperkevic, Jana; Wong, Julia Carrie (February 2, 2016). "Yahoo cutting workforce by 15% after announcing $4.4bn loss". The Guardian.
  83. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 25, 2016". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  84. ^Goel, Vindu; Merced, Michael J. De La (July 24, 2016). "Yahoo's Sale to Verizon Ends an Era for a Web Pioneer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 27, 2016. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  85. ^Lien, Tracey (July 25, 2016). "Verizon buys Yahoo for $4.8 billion, and it's giving Yahoo's brand another chance". Archived from the original on July 25, 2016. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  86. ^Griswold, Alison. "The stunning collapse of Yahoo's valuation". Archived from the original on July 30, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  87. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form DEFA14A, Filing Date Aug 1, 2016"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  88. ^"Verizon, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 25, 2016". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  89. ^Moritz, Scott; Sherman, Alex; Womack, Brian (February 15, 2017). "Verizon Said to Near Yahoo Deal at Lower Price After Hacks". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017.
  90. ^Snider, Mike (February 21, 2017). "Verizon shaves $350 million from Yahoo price". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  91. ^Kharpal, Arjun (June 13, 2017). "Verizon completes acquisition of Yahoo as Marissa Mayer resigns". CNBC. Archived from the original on June 13, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  92. ^Fiegerman, Seth (June 13, 2017). "End of an era: Yahoo is no longer an independent company". CNN. Archived from the original on June 13, 2017.
  93. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 27, 2017". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018.
  94. ^Chokshi, Niraj; Goel, Vindu (April 3, 2017). "Verizon Announces New Name Brand for AOL and Yahoo: Oath". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 4, 2017.
  95. ^"Altaba Announces Liquidating Distribution of $8.33 Per Share" (Press release). Business Wire. October 26, 2020.
  96. ^"Apollo Funds Complete Acquisition of Yahoo" (Press release). Apollo Global Management. September 1, 2021.
  97. ^Soo, Zen (November 3, 2021). "Yahoo pulls out of China, citing 'challenging' environment". Associated Press. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  98. ^Lee, Wendy (June 13, 2017). "Verizon-Yahoo deal is official; Marissa Mayer resigns". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on August 8, 2017.
  99. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Sep 22, 2016". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Archived from the original on April 29, 2018.
  100. ^Perlroth, Nicole (September 22, 2016). "Yahoo Says Hackers Stole Data on 500 Million Users in 2014". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 22, 2016.
  101. ^"Yahoo 'state' hackers stole data from 500 million users". BBC News. September 23, 2016. Archived from the original on September 23, 2016.
  102. ^Goel, Vindu (March 15, 2017). "Russian Agents Were Behind Yahoo Breach, U.S. Says". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 16, 2017.
  103. ^Lawrence, Dune. "Here's How Russian Agents Hacked 500 Million Yahoo Users". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on March 16, 2017.
  104. ^Goel, Vindu (December 14, 2016). "Yahoo Says 1 Billion User Accounts Were Hacked". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 14, 2016.
  105. ^Gallagher, Sean (February 15, 2017). "Yahoo reveals more breachiness to users victimized by forged cookies [Updated]". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on February 21, 2017.
  106. ^Snider, Mike; Weise, Elizabeth (September 22, 2016). "500 million Yahoo accounts breached". USA Today. Archived from the original on September 9, 2017.
  107. ^McMillan, Robert; Knutson, Ryan (October 3, 2017). "Yahoo Triples Estimate of Breached Accounts to 3 Billion". The Wall Street Journal.
  108. ^"Verizon Communications Inc., Form 8-K, Current Report". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. October 3, 2017. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018.
  109. ^"Yahoo provides notice to additional users affected by previously disclosed 2013 data theft" (Press release). Verizon Media. October 3, 2017. Archived from the original on October 3, 2017.
  110. ^McCrank, John; Bartz, Diane (October 3, 2017). "Former Equifax chief apologizes to Congress over hack". Reuters. Archived from the original on November 10, 2017.
  111. ^Moritz, Scott (October 3, 2017). "Yahoo Triples Likely Scope of 2013 Hack to 3 Billion Users". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on October 3, 2017.
  112. ^"Yahoo Tries to Hide Snoop Service Price List". Electronic Frontier Foundation. November 30, 2009. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012.
  113. ^Fang, Lee (September 20, 2011). "Yahoo Appears To Be Censoring Email Messages About Wall Street Protests (Updated)". ThinkProgress. Center for American Progress Action Fund. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012.
  114. ^TheFreak (September 2011). "Yahoo Censoring "Occupy Wall Street" Protest Messages". Videosift. Sift Partners, Inc. Archived from the original on June 20, 2012. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  115. ^Nelson, Miranda (September 20, 2011). "Yahoo admits blocking Wall Street protest emails, says censorship was "not intentional"". The Georgia Straight. Vancouver. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012.
  116. ^"Yahoo! And FIFA Form Expansive Global Relationship For Soccer's FIFA World Cup™, The World's Biggest Sporting Event | Altaba Inc". www.altaba.com.
  117. ^"Yahoo! Partners with the 2012 Sundance Film Festival". news.yahoo.com.
  118. ^"Yahoo Logo Design, Logo Design History". LogoOrange.com. Archived from the original on September 29, 2011.
  119. ^"Y – Yahoo". All Acronyms. 2012. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012.
  120. ^Swartz, Jon (August 7, 2013). "Yahoo is getting a new logo – in a month". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 26, 2013.
  121. ^Knight, Shawn (August 7, 2013). "Yahoo's 30 days of change campaign will end with new logo design". TechSpot. Archived from the original on August 10, 2013. Retrieved August 14, 2013.
  122. ^Newton, Casey (September 5, 2013). "Yahoo reveals its new logo". The Verge. Vox Media, Inc.Archived from the original on September 20, 2013.
  123. ^OREMUS, WILL (September 5, 2013). "Yahoo's New Logo Is Another Win for Marissa Mayer". Slate.
  124. ^Perez, Sarah (September 19, 2013). "Yahoo Resurrects The Personalized Homepage With "My Yahoo" Revamp". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013.
  125. ^Edwards, Victoria (September 21, 2013). "6 Things We Learned From Marissa Mayer and Mark Zuckerberg at TechCrunch Disrupt 2013". Search Engine Watch. Archived from the original on September 24, 2013.
  126. ^"Yahoo Brand Identity". Pentagram.

External links

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahoo!

Yahoo is the third major US tech platform to exit China in the past month

Yahoo announced today (Nov. 2) that it will no longer operate in China as the country tightens data and privacy regulations that are making it increasingly difficult for US companies to operate there.

“In recognition of the increasingly challenging business and legal environment in China, Yahoo’s suite of services will no longer be accessible from mainland China as of November 1,” the tech and media company said in a statement. Yahoo has been downsizing its operations in China for years and its email and news services have not been operating in the country since 2013.

The move by Yahoo is the third exit by a major US tech platform from China in a month, following LinkedIn’s decision to remove its site on Oct. 14 and Epic Games’s Nov. 1 announcement that it will stop testing a Chinese version of the video game Fortnite. The exits come as China’s president Xi Jinping pursues a tech crackdown that has affected both domestic and foreign companies.

China’s new data and privacy law went into effect this week

China’s Personal Information and Protection Law, which took effect yesterday is part of a series of sweeping measures instituted by the Communist Party to tighten regulations of the country’s private sector. This most recent law seeks to regulate the way technology companies collect biometric data and personal information on users.

While Yahoo didn’t mention this particular law when it announced it is pulling out of China entirely, the new privacy regulations are expected to have a major effect on the way tech companies operate in the country. Companies that don’t comply with the new data and privacy regulations could be fined up to 5% of their last year’s turnover, and even data processing activities that happen outside of China are subject to jurisdiction.

“There’s just so much uncertainty now with media and tech companies in China that it doesn’t make a lot of financial sense to maintain such a large presence when you run into so much red tape,” said Brandon Hughes, the founder of consulting group FAO Global. He added that it likely doesn’t help that Yahoo’s business has been declining for some time. Although Yahoo was only worth about 1% of its peak valuation when Apollo Global Management bought the firm in May, the company claims 900 million monthly users for its email and sites that focus on sports and finance.

In an Oct. 14 blog post, LinkedIn said it had decided to sunset a localized version of LinkedIn in the country due to a “significantly more challenging operating environment and greater compliance requirements in China.” Epic Games didn’t offer a reason for why it was shutting down Fortnite servers in China, but the country’s targeting of the video game market may have something to do with it. In August China announced young people under 18 would only be allowed to play video games for three hours each week.

Tech crackdown is more focused on Chinese firms

Despite the recent exit of a few US tech firms, Hughes said China’s tech crackdown is likely more focused on the growing political influence of the country’s own tech giants than anything else. In July China blocked the ride-hailing app Didi from app stores after accusing it of improperly collecting users’ personal data just shortly before it was set to IPO in the US. Alibaba’s IPO was also thwarted after its powerful chief Jack Ma criticized Chinese government officials  in October 2020.

“I think the CCP is taking advantage of this incredibly disruptive period to pack in regulations that were long overdue,” Hughes said of the new rules, but added the public influence of the company’s tech leaders likely catalyzed China’s regulatory plans. “It’s becoming a political situation as these companies are taking a stance on certain government policies,” he added.

Источник: https://qz.com/2083556/yahoo-is-the-latest-us-tech-company-to-announce-its-china-exit/

Yahoo 'secretly monitored emails on behalf of the US government'

Yahoo last year secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customers’ incoming emails for specific information at the request of US intelligence officials, according to a report.

The company complied with a classified US government directive, scanning hundreds of millions of Yahoo Mail accounts at the behest of the National Security Agency (NSA) or FBI, two former employees and a third person who knew about the program told Reuters.

Some surveillance experts said this represents the first known case of a US internet company agreeing to a spy agency’s demand by searching all arriving messages, as opposed to examining stored messages or scanning a small number of accounts in real time.

It is not known what information intelligence officials were looking for, only that they wanted Yahoo to search for a set of characters. That could mean a phrase in an email or an attachment, said the sources.

Reuters was unable to determine what data Yahoo may have handed over, if any, and whether intelligence officials had approached other email providers besides Yahoo with this kind of request.

According to the two former employees, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s decision to obey the directive troubled some senior executives and led to the June 2015 departure of the chief information security officer, Alex Stamos, who now heads security at Facebook.

“Yahoo is a law abiding company, and complies with the laws of the United States,” the company said in a brief statement in response to Reuters questions about the demand. Yahoo declined any further comment.

Andrew Crocker, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said that the use of the word “directive” to describe the program indicated that the request may have been ordered under the section 702 of the 2008 Fisa Amendments Act, which allows the government to target non-US citizens abroad for surveillance.

Revelations by Edward Snowden about the Prism and Upstream programs – of which the Yahoo program looks like a hybrid, Crocker said – show that US citizens were also subject to mass surveillance.

“The fourth amendment and attendant privacy concerns are quite staggering,” Crocker said. “It sounds like they are scanning all emails, even inside the US … the fourth amendment protects that fully. It’s hard to see how the government justifies requiring Yahoo to search emails like that; there is no warrant that could possibly justify scanning all emails.”

Yahoo security initially ‘thought hackers had broken in’

Sources said the program was discovered by Yahoo’s security team in May 2015, within weeks of its installation. Staff initially thought hackers had broken in.

When Stamos found out that Mayer had authorized the program, he resigned as chief information security officer and told his subordinates that he had been left out of a decision that hurt users’ security, sources said. Due to a programming flaw, he told them, hackers could have accessed the stored emails.

Stamos declined a request by the Guardian for an interview.

Stamos’s announcement in June 2015 that he had joined Facebook did not mention any problems with Yahoo.

The NSA referred questions to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which declined to comment.

The demand to search Yahoo Mail accounts came in the form of a classified directive sent to the company’s legal team, according to the three people familiar with the matter. US phone and internet companies are known to have handed over bulk customer data to intelligence agencies. But some former government officials and private surveillance experts said they had not previously seen either such a broad directive for real-time web collection or one that required the creation of a new computer program.

It is deeply disappointing. Post-Snowden, customers are counting on tech companies to stand up to novel spying demands
Patrick Toomey, ACLU staff attorney

“I’ve never seen that, a wiretap in real time on a ‘selector’,” said Albert Gidari, a lawyer who represented phone and internet companies on surveillance issues for 20 years before moving to Stanford University in 2016. A selector refers to a type of search term used to zero in on specific information. “It would be really difficult for a provider to do that,” he added.

Experts said it was likely that the NSA or FBI had approached other internet companies with the same demand, since they evidently did not know what email accounts were being used by the target. The NSA usually makes requests for domestic surveillance through the FBI, so it is hard to discern which agency is seeking the information.

Reuters was unable to confirm whether the 2015 demand went to other companies, or if any complied.

Google, whose Gmail is the world’s largest email service, said on Tuesday that it hadn’t received a similar spying request from the request from the US government. If it had, Google said, its response would be: “No way.” Microsoft, whose email service also is larger than Yahoo, also said it has “never engaged in the secret scanning of email traffic.”

Twitter, which doesn’t provide email service but does allow users to exchange direct messages, likewise said it has never received such a request and would challenge it in court if it did.

A Facebook spokesperson said: “Facebook has never received a request like the one described in these news reports from any government, and if we did we would fight it.”

Apple fought a legal case against a similar request by the US government in February after refusing to give access to the phone used by one the attackers in the 2015 San Bernardino massacre.

In a statement, the company said: “We have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.”

In a further statement, Apple said “We have never received a request of this type. If we were to receive one, we would oppose it in court.”

Companies are obliged to comply with government requests

Under laws including the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, intelligence agencies can ask US phone and internet companies to provide customer data to aid foreign intelligence-gathering efforts for a variety of reasons, including prevention of terrorist attacks.

Disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and others have exposed the extent of electronic surveillance and led US authorities to modestly scale back some of the programs, in part to protect privacy rights.

Technology companies – including Yahoo – have challenged some classified surveillance before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (Fisa), a secret tribunal.

Some Fisa experts said Yahoo could have tried to fight last year’s directive on at least two grounds: the breadth of the demand and the necessity of writing a special program to search all customers’ emails in transit.

In the Apple case, the FBI dropped the lawsuit when it unlocked the phone with the help of a third party, so no precedent was set.

Other Fisa experts have defended Yahoo’s decision to comply, saying nothing prohibited the surveillance court from ordering a search for a specific term instead of a specific account. So-called “upstream” bulk collection from phone carriers based on content was found to be legal, they said, and the same logic could apply to web companies’ mail.

As tech companies become better at encrypting data, they are likely to face more such requests from spy agencies. Former NSA general counsel Stewart Baker said email providers “have the power to encrypt it all, and with that comes added responsibility to do some of the work that had been done by the intelligence agencies”.

ACLU staff attorney Patrick Toomey said that the demand made on Yahoo was “unprecedented” and potentially unconstitutional. He said it represented “a new surveillance paradigm, one in which computers constantly scan our communications for information of interest to the government”.

“It is deeply disappointing that Yahoo simply chose to comply with this sweeping surveillance order,” Toomey said. “In the post-Snowden world, customers are counting on technology companies to stand up to novel spying demands in court, because customers themselves have no opportunity to challenge these invasions of their privacy.”

Senator Ron Wyden told the Guardian: “It is a fact that collection under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act has a significant impact on Americans’ privacy. It is public record that this expansive surveillance program is the basis for warrantless searches of Americans’ emails, and that the government has never even counted how many.

“The NSA has said that it only targets individuals under Section 702 by searching for email addresses and similar identifiers. If that has changed, the executive branch has an obligation to notify the public.”

Marissa Mayer ‘did not involve the security team’

Mayer and other executives ultimately decided to comply with the directive last year rather than fight it, in part because they thought they would lose, said the people familiar with the matter.

Yahoo in 2007 fought a Fisa demand that it conduct searches on specific email accounts without a court-approved warrant. Details of the case remain sealed, but a partially redacted published opinion showed Yahoo’s challenge was unsuccessful.

Some Yahoo employees were upset about the decision not to contest the more recent directive and thought the company could have prevailed, the sources said. They were also upset that Mayer and Yahoo general counsel Ron Bell did not involve the company’s security team in the process, instead asking Yahoo’s email engineers to write a program to siphon off messages containing the character string the spies sought and store them for remote retrieval, according to the sources.

In a separate incident, Yahoo last month said “state-sponsored” hackers had gained access to 500m customer accounts in 2014.

The revelations have brought new scrutiny to Yahoo’s security practices as the company tries to complete a deal to sell its core business to Verizon for $4.8bn.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/oct/04/yahoo-secret-email-program-nsa-fbi

By Eric Tucker, The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The United States announced charges Wednesday against two Russian intelligence officers and two hackers, accusing them of a mega data breach at Yahoo that affected at least a half billion user accounts.

The hack targeted the email accounts of Russian and U.S. officials, Russian journalists, and employees of financial services and other businesses, officials said.

“We will not allow individuals, groups, nation states or a combination of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the security of our country,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Mary McCord.

One of the defendants has been taken into custody in Canada, and another is on the list of the FBI’s most wanted cyber criminals.

The charges arise from a compromise of Yahoo user accounts that began at least as early as 2014. Though the Justice Department has previously charged Russian hackers with cybercrime — as well as hackers sponsored by the Chinese and Iranian governments — this is the first criminal case brought against Russian government officials.

The announcement comes as federal authorities investigate Russian interference through hacking in the 2016 presidential election.

Yahoo didn’t disclose the 2014 breach until last September when it began notifying at least 500 million users that their email addresses, birth dates, answers to security questions and other personal information may have been stolen. Three months later, Yahoo revealed it had uncovered a separate hack in 2013 affecting about 1 billion accounts, including some that were also hit in 2014.

In a statement, Chris Madsen, Yahoo’s assistant general counsel and head of global security, thanked law enforcement agencies for their work.

“We’re committed to keeping our users and our platforms secure and will continue to engage with law enforcement to combat cybercrime,” he said.

 

Источник: https://www.denverpost.com/2017/03/15/yahoo-data-breach-us-charges/

Yahoo.com has redesigned its homepage to make it more appealing to a new generation of the online audience. Thanks to the redesign, the oldest web portal got a simplified, crisper look as well as more social-media feel, which is believed to help the website deliver consistent user experience across desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. So far, Yahoo has rolled out the new look only in the U.S.
Over the past time the popularity of the Yahoo’s portal was declining—partly, due to the its old-fashioned outlay. The team behind the Yahoo led by the relatively recently appointed CEO Marissa Mayer decided to introduce some evolutionary rather than revolutionary changes to improve user experience.

Pic.: Yahoo! redesigned page

First and foremost it’s a fresh foundation for a new Yahoo experience. Overall the design is streamlined for everyday use and focused on what matters most to our users—which is the content,” commented Yahoo design director Jackie Goldberg.

The refreshed homepage was introduced last Wednesday, February 20, following the design and function updates of Yahoo Mail and a new Flickr app. While paying tribute to the previous version’s style and authentic editor-picked content strategy, the refreshed page has a social-media twist with its no-bottom news feed, which is updated automatically. Readers can view the latest news in the All Stories section or choose a specific category, Business, Celebrities, Politics, Sports, and more.

Each news summary in the feed can be shared via Twitter, Facebook or email using the built-in functions. The page “remembers” a user’s share preferences and delivers more news on the selected themes. Since the updated page has integration with Facebook, it features more news pieces related to the pages the user has liked on Facebook. The updated homepage also serves as a great platform for delivering targeted ads tailored to consumer’s interests and preferences. The ads will be easily recognizable and won’t be confused with the new content.

The redesign has been introduced seven months after Yahoo! got a new CEO, Marissa Mayer, who had been Google’s vice president of location and search.

Related posts

Источник: https://popsop.com/2013/02/the-u-s-yahoo-com-homepage-has-been-redesigned-with-a-social-media-twist/

Updated October 7, 2016 with additional clarification and analysis of Yahoo’s denial

Dear ProtonMail Community,

Two weeks ago, we published a security advisory regarding the mass hacking of Yahoo. Unfortunately, due to recent events, we are issuing a second advisory regarding all US email providers.

What happened?

This week, it was revealed that as a result of a secret US government directive, Yahoo was forced to implement special surveillance software to scan all Yahoo Mail accounts at the request of the NSA and FBI. Sometime in early 2015, Yahoo secretly modified their spam and malware filters to scan all incoming email messages for the phrases in the court order and then siphoned those messages off to US intelligence. This is significant for several reasons:

 

  • This is the first known incident where a US intelligence directive has indiscriminately targeted all accounts as opposed to just the accounts of suspects. Effectively, all 500 million+ Yahoo Mail users were presumed to be guilty.
  • Instead of searching stored messages, this directive forced Yahoo to scan incoming messages in real-time.
  • Because ALL incoming email messages were targeted, this program spied on every person who emailed a Yahoo Mail account, violating the privacy of users around the world who may not even have been using a US email service.

 

What does this mean for US tech companies?

This is a terrible precedent and ushers in a new era of global mass surveillance. It means that US tech companies that serve billions of users around the world can now be forced to act as extensions of the US surveillance apparatus. The problem extends well beyond Yahoo. As was reported earlier, Yahoo did not fight the secret directive because Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and the Yahoo legal team did not believe that they could successfully resist the directive.

We believe that Yahoo’s assessment is correct. If it was possible to fight the directive, Yahoo certainly would have done so since they previously fought against secret FISA court orders in 2008. It does not make sense that US surveillance agencies would serve Yahoo Mail with such an order but ignore Gmail, the world’s largest email provider, or Outlook. There is no doubt that the secret surveillance software is also present in Gmail and Outlook, or at least there is nothing preventing Gmail and Outlook from being forced to comply with a similar directive in the future.  From a legal perspective, there is nothing that makes Yahoo particularly vulnerable, or Google particularly invulnerable.

Google and Microsoft have come out to deny they participated in US government mandated mass surveillance, but under a National Security Letter (NSL) gag order, Google and Microsoft would have no choice but to deny the allegations or risk breaking US law (our analysis of Yahoo’s denial is at the bottom of this post). Again ,there is no conceivable reason US intelligence would target Yahoo but ignore Gmail, so we must consider this to be the most probable scenario, particularly since gag orders have become the norm rather than the exception.

In effect, the US government has now officially co-opted US tech companies to perform mass surveillance on all users, regardless of whether they are under US jurisdiction or not. Given the huge amount of data that Google has, this is a truly scary proposition.

How does this impact ProtonMail?

ProtonMail’s secure email service is based in Switzerland and all our servers are located in Switzerland, so all user data is maintained under the protection of Swiss privacy laws. ProtonMail cannot be compelled to perform mass surveillance on our users, nor be compelled to act on behalf of US intelligence. ProtonMail also utilizes end-to-end encryption which means we do not have the capability to read user emails in the first place, so we couldn’t hand over user email data even if we wanted to.

However, since email is an open system, any unencrypted email that goes out of ProtonMail, to Yahoo Mail for example, could potentially have been swept up by these mass surveillance programs and sent to US government agencies. This is why if you want to avoid having your communications scanned and saved by US government agencies, it is important to invite friends, family, and colleagues to use non-US email accounts such as ProtonMail or other email services offered by European companies.

What can the rest of the world do about this?

Unfortunately, the tech sector today is entirely dominated by US companies. Just like Google has a monopoly on search, the US government has a near monopoly on mass surveillance. Even without US government pressure, most US tech companies also have perverse economic incentives to slowly chip away at digital privacy.

This week, we have again seen how easily the massive amounts of private data retained by US tech companies can be abused by US intelligence for their own purposes. Without alternatives to the US tech giants, the rest of the world has no choice but to consent to this. This is an unprecedented challenge, but it also presents an unprecedented opportunity, particularly for Europe.

Now is the time for Europe to invest in its own tech sector, unbeholden to outside interests. This is the only way the European community can continue to safeguard the European ideals of privacy, liberty, and freedom online. It is time for European governments and citizens to act before it is too late.

The only chance for privacy to prevail against these attacks is for the global community to support a new generation of web services which protect privacy by default. These services, such as ProtonMail’s encrypted email service, must operate with a business model where users can donate or pay for services, instead of giving up data and privacy. The security community also has an obligation to make these new service just as easy to use as the ones they replace.

Services such as secure email, search, and cloud storage are now vital to our lives. Their importance means that for the good of all citizens, we need to develop private alternatives that are aligned with users, and free from corporate greed and government overreach. Crowdfunded services like ProtonMail are rising to the challenge, but we need more support from the global community to successfully take on better funded US tech giants. Privacy matters, and your support is essential to ensure the Internet of the future is one that protects our rights.

Best Regards,
The ProtonMail Team

You can get a free secure email account from ProtonMail here.

You can support our mission by upgrading to a paid plan or donating so that we can grow beyond email.

Analysis of Yahoo Denial:

Yahoo, like every other US tech company, has issued a denial, basically denying Reuter’s account of the mass surveillance. Here is Yahoo’s denial, word for word:

“The article is misleading. We narrowly interpret every government request for user data to minimize disclosure. The mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems.”

It is curious that Yahoo’s response to this incident is only 29 words, but upon closer examination, it is a very carefully crafted 29 words. First, Yahoo calls the reports misleading. This is a curious choice of words because it does not claim that the report is false. Finally, Yahoo states that, “The mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems.” While this could be a true statement, it does NOT deny that the scanning could have been present on Yahoo’s systems in the past.

The same day as the Yahoo denial, the New York Times obtained independent verification of the Reuter’s story from two US government officials. This allowed the New York Times to confirm the following facts:

  • Yahoo is in fact under a gag order and from a legal standpoint, they cannot confirm the mass surveillance (in other words, they must deny the story or avoid making any statements that would be seen as a confirmation).
  • The Yahoo mass data collection did in fact take place, but the collection is no longer occurring at present time. Thus, we now understand the disingenuous wording of the last sentence in Yahoo’s statement.

Yahoo’s denial (or non-denial, as the case may be), followed immediately by confirmation by the NYT demonstrates the new reality that denials by US tech companies cannot really be taken at face value anymore. It is not that US tech companies are intentionally trying to mislead their customers, but many times, they have no choice due to the gag orders that now inevitably accompany any government requests. If statements from US tech companies turn out to be suspect (as in the Yahoo example), the likelihood of the public ever knowing the truth becomes highly unlikely, and this brings us to a dangerous place.

Privacy  featured

Источник: https://protonmail.com/blog/yahoo-us-intelligence/

By Eric Tucker, The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — The United States announced charges Wednesday against two Russian intelligence yahoo com usa and two hackers, accusing them of a mega data breach at Yahoo that affected at least a half billion user accounts.

The hack targeted the email accounts of Russian and U.S. officials, Russian journalists, and employees of financial services and other businesses, officials said.

“We will not allow individuals, groups, nation states or a yahoo com usa of them to compromise the privacy of our citizens, the economic interests of our companies, or the security of our country,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General Mary McCord.

One of the defendants has been taken into custody in Canada, and another is on the list of the FBI’s most wanted cyber criminals.

The charges arise from a compromise of Yahoo user accounts that began at least as early as 2014. Though the Justice Department has previously charged Russian hackers with cybercrime — as well as hackers sponsored by the Chinese and Iranian governments — this is the first criminal case brought against Russian government officials.

The announcement comes as federal authorities investigate Russian interference through hacking in the 2016 presidential election.

Yahoo didn’t disclose the 2014 breach until last September when it began notifying at least 500 million users that their email addresses, birth dates, answers to security questions and other personal information may have been stolen. Three months later, Yahoo revealed it had uncovered a separate hack in 2013 affecting about 1 billion accounts, including some that were also hit in 2014.

In a statement, Chris Madsen, Yahoo’s assistant general counsel and head of global security, thanked law enforcement agencies for their work.

“We’re committed to keeping our users and our platforms secure and will continue to engage with law enforcement to combat cybercrime,” he said.

 

Источник: https://www.denverpost.com/2017/03/15/yahoo-data-breach-us-charges/

Updated October 7, 2016 with additional clarification and analysis of Yahoo’s denial

Dear ProtonMail Community,

Two weeks ago, we published a security advisory regarding the mass hacking of Yahoo. Unfortunately, due to recent events, we are issuing a second advisory regarding all US email providers.

What happened?

This week, it was revealed that as a result of a secret US government directive, Yahoo was forced to implement special surveillance software to scan all Yahoo Mail accounts at the request of the NSA and FBI. Sometime in early 2015, Yahoo secretly modified their spam and malware filters to scan all incoming email messages for the phrases in the court order and then siphoned those messages off to US intelligence. This is significant for several reasons:

 

  • This is the first known incident where a US intelligence directive has indiscriminately targeted all accounts as opposed to just the accounts of suspects. Effectively, all 500 million+ Yahoo Mail users were presumed to be guilty.
  • Instead of searching stored messages, this directive forced Yahoo to scan incoming messages in real-time.
  • Because ALL incoming email messages were targeted, this program spied on every person who emailed a Yahoo Mail yahoo com usa, violating the privacy of users around the world who may not even have been using a US email service.

 

What does this mean for US tech companies?

This is a terrible precedent and ushers in a new era of global mass surveillance. It means that US tech companies that serve billions of users around the world can now be forced to act as extensions of the US surveillance apparatus. The problem extends well beyond Yahoo. As was reported earlier, Yahoo did not fight the secret directive because Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer and the Yahoo legal team did not believe that they could successfully resist the directive.

We believe that Yahoo’s assessment is correct. If it was possible to fight the directive, Yahoo certainly would have done so since they previously fought against secret FISA court orders in 2008. It does not make sense that US surveillance agencies would serve Yahoo Mail with such an order but ignore Gmail, the world’s largest email provider, or Outlook. There is no doubt that the secret surveillance software is also present in Gmail and Outlook, or at least there is nothing preventing Gmail and Outlook from being forced to comply with a similar directive in the future.  From a legal perspective, there is nothing that makes Yahoo particularly vulnerable, or Google particularly invulnerable.

Google and Microsoft have come out to deny they participated in US government mandated mass surveillance, but under a National Security Letter (NSL) gag order, Google and Microsoft would have no choice but to deny the allegations or risk breaking US law (our analysis of Yahoo’s denial is at the bottom of this post). Again ,there is no conceivable reason US intelligence would target Yahoo but ignore Gmail, so we must consider this to be the most probable scenario, particularly since gag orders have become the norm rather than the exception.

In effect, the US government has now officially co-opted US tech companies to perform mass surveillance on all users, regardless of whether they are under US jurisdiction or not. Given the huge amount of data that Google has, this is a truly scary proposition.

How does this impact ProtonMail?

ProtonMail’s secure email service is based in Switzerland and all our servers are located in Switzerland, so all user data is maintained under the protection of Swiss privacy laws. ProtonMail cannot be compelled to perform mass surveillance on our yahoo com usa, nor be compelled to act on behalf of US intelligence. ProtonMail also utilizes end-to-end encryption which means we do not have the capability to read user emails in the first place, so we couldn’t hand over user email data even if we wanted to.

However, since email is an open system, any unencrypted email that goes out of ProtonMail, to Yahoo Mail for example, could potentially have been swept up by these mass surveillance programs and sent to US government agencies. This is why if you want to avoid having your communications scanned and saved by US government agencies, it is important to invite friends, family, and colleagues to use non-US email accounts such as ProtonMail or other email services offered by European companies.

What can the rest of the world do about this?

Unfortunately, the tech sector today is entirely dominated by US companies. Just like Google has a monopoly on search, the US government has a near monopoly on mass surveillance. Even without US government pressure, most US tech companies also have perverse economic incentives to slowly chip away at digital privacy.

This week, we have again seen how easily the massive amounts of private data retained by US tech companies can be abused by US intelligence for their own purposes. Without alternatives to the US tech giants, the rest of the world has no choice but to consent to this. This is an unprecedented challenge, but it also presents an unprecedented opportunity, particularly for Europe.

Now is the time for Europe to invest in its own tech sector, unbeholden to outside interests. This is the only way the European community can continue to safeguard the European ideals of privacy, liberty, and freedom online. It is time for European governments and citizens to act before it is too late.

The only chance for privacy to prevail against these attacks is for the global community to support a new generation of web services which protect privacy by default. These services, such as ProtonMail’s encrypted email service, must operate with a business model where users can donate or pay for services, instead of giving up data and privacy. The security community also has an obligation to make these new service just as easy to use as the ones they replace.

Services such as secure email, search, and cloud storage are now vital to our lives. Their importance means that for the good of all citizens, we need to develop private alternatives that are aligned with users, and free from corporate greed and government overreach. Crowdfunded services like ProtonMail are rising to the challenge, but we need more support from the global community to successfully take on better funded US tech giants. Privacy matters, and your support is essential to ensure the Internet of the future is one that protects our rights.

Best Regards,
The ProtonMail Team

You can get a free secure email account from ProtonMail here.

You can support our mission by upgrading to a paid plan or donating so that we can grow beyond email.

Analysis of Yahoo Denial:

Yahoo, like every other US tech company, has issued a denial, basically denying Reuter’s account of the mass surveillance. Here is Yahoo’s denial, word for word:

“The article is misleading. We narrowly interpret every government request for user data to minimize disclosure. The mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems.”

It is curious that Yahoo’s response to this incident is only 29 words, but upon closer examination, it is a very carefully crafted 29 words. First, Yahoo calls the reports misleading. This is a curious choice of words because it does not claim that the report is false. Finally, Yahoo states that, “The mail scanning described in the article does not exist on our systems.” While this could be a true statement, it does NOT deny that the scanning could have been present on Yahoo’s systems in the past.

The same day as the Yahoo denial, the New York Times obtained independent verification of the Reuter’s story from two US government officials. This allowed the New York Times to confirm the following facts:

  • Yahoo is in fact under a gag order and from a legal standpoint, they ope ope no mi eternal life confirm the mass surveillance (in other words, they must deny the story or avoid making any statements that would be seen as a confirmation).
  • The Yahoo mass data collection did in fact take place, but the collection is no longer occurring at present time. Thus, we now understand the disingenuous wording of the last sentence in Yahoo’s statement.

Yahoo’s denial (or non-denial, as the case may be), followed immediately by confirmation by the NYT demonstrates the new reality that denials by US tech companies cannot really be taken at face value anymore. It is not that US tech companies are intentionally trying to mislead their customers, but many times, they have no choice due to the gag orders that now inevitably accompany any government requests. If statements from US tech companies turn out to be suspect (as in the Yahoo example), the likelihood of the public ever knowing the truth becomes highly unlikely, and this brings us to a dangerous place.

Privacy  featured

Источник: https://protonmail.com/blog/yahoo-us-intelligence/

Yahoo!

American web portal

This article is about the web portal. For the search function, see Yahoo! Search. For the now-unaffiliated Japanese company, see Yahoo! Japan. For other uses, see Yahoo (disambiguation).

Yahoo (, styled as yahoo!)[7][8] is an American web services provider. It is headquartered in Sunnyvale, California and operated by the namesake company Yahoo! Inc., which is 90% owned by investment funds managed by Apollo Yahoo com usa Management and 10% by Verizon Communications.

It provides a web portal, search engineYahoo Search, and related services, including My Yahoo!, Yahoo Mail, Yahoo News, Yahoo Finance, Yahoo Sports and its advertising platform, Yahoo! Native.

Yahoo was established by Jerry Yang and David Filo in January 1994 and was one of the pioneers of the early Internet era in the 1990s.[9] In 2000, it was the most popular website worldwide.[10] Usage declined in the late 2000s as it lost market share to Google.[11][12] However, Yahoo domain websites are still among the most popular websites, ranking 12th in global engagement according to both Alexa Internet[13] and SimilarWeb.[14]

History

Main article: History of Yahoo!

See also: Timeline of Yahoo!

Founding

The Yahoo home page in 1994, when it was a directory. A search enginewas added in 1995.

In January 1994, Yang and Filo were electrical engineering graduate students at Stanford University, when they created a website named "Jerry and David's guide to the World Wide Web".[15][16][17][18] The site was a human-edited web directory, organized in a hierarchy, as opposed to a searchable index of pages. In March 1994, "Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web" was renamed "Yahoo!" and became known as the Yahoo Directory.[19][20][21][22][23] The "yahoo.com" domain was registered on January 18, 1995.[24]

The word "yahoo" is a backronym for "Yet Another Hierarchically Organized Oracle"[25] or "Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle".[26] The term "hierarchical" described how the Yahoo database was arranged in layers of subcategories. The term "oracle" was intended to mean "source of truth and wisdom", and the term "officious", rather than being related to the word's normal meaning, described the many office workers who would use the Yahoo database while surfing from work.[27] However, Filo and Yang insist they mainly selected the name because they liked the slang definition of a "yahoo" (used by college students in David Filo's native Louisiana in the late 1980s and early 1990s to refer to an unsophisticated, rural Southerner): "rude, unsophisticated, uncouth."[28] This meaning derives from the Yahoo race of fictional beings from Gulliver's Travels.

Yahoo was incorporated on March 2, 1995. In 1995, a search engine function, called Yahoo Search, was introduced. This allowed users to search Yahoo Directory.[29][30] Yahoo soon became the first popular online directory and search engine on the World Wide Web.[31]

Expansion

Map showing localized versions of Yahoo! web portals, as of 2008

Yahoo grew rapidly throughout the 1990s. Yahoo became a public company via an initial public offering in April 1996 and its stock price rose 600% within two years.[32] Like many search engines and web directories, Yahoo added a web portal, putting it in competition with services including Excite, Lycos, and America Online.[33] By 1998, Yahoo was the most popular starting point for web users,[34] and the human-edited Yahoo Directory the most popular search engine,[22] receiving 95 million page views per day, triple that of rival Excite.[32] It also made many high-profile acquisitions. Yahoo began offering free e-mail from October 1997 after the acquisition of RocketMail, which was then renamed to Yahoo Mail.[35] In 1998, Yahoo replaced AltaVista as the crawler-based search engine underlying the Directory with Inktomi.[36] Yahoo's two biggest acquisitions were made in 1999: Geocities for $3.6 billion[37] and Broadcast.com for $5.7 billion.[38]

Its stock price skyrocketed during the dot-com bubble, closing at an all-time high of $118.75/share on January 3, 2000. However, after the dot-com bubble burst, it reached a post-bubble low of $8.11 on September 26, 2001.[39]

Yahoo began using Google for search in June 2000.[40][41] Over the next four years, it developed its own search technologies, which it began using in 2004 partly using technology from its $280 million acquisition of Inktomi in 2002.[42] In response to Google's Gmail, Yahoo began to offer unlimited email storage in 2007. In 2008, the company laid off hundreds of people as it struggled from competition.[43]

Yahoo headquarters in 2001

In February 2008, Microsoft made an unsolicited bid to acquire Yahoo for $44.6 billion.[44][45] Yahoo rejected the bid, claiming that it "substantially undervalues" the company and was not in the interest of its shareholders. Although Microsoft increased its bid to $47 billion, Yahoo insisted on another 10%+ increase to the offer and Microsoft cancelled the offer in May 2008.[46][47][48][49]

Carol Bartz, who had no previous experience in Internet advertising, replaced Yang as CEO in January 2009.[50][51] In September 2011, after failing to meet targets, she was fired by chairman Roy J. Bostock; CFO Tim Morse was named as Interim CEO of the company.[52][53]

In April 2012, after the appointment of Scott Thompson as CEO, several key executives resigned, including chief product officerBlake Irving.[54][55] On April 4, 2012, Yahoo announced 2,000 layoffs,[56] or about 14% of its 14,100 workers by the end of year, expected to save around $375 million annually.[57] In an email sent to employees in April 2012, Thompson reiterated his view that customers should come first at Yahoo. He also completely reorganized the company.[58]

On May 13, 2012, Thompson was fired and was replaced on an interim basis by Ross Levinsohn, recently appointed head of Yahoo's new Media group. Several associates of Third Point Management, including Daniel S. Loeb were nominated to the board of directors.[59][58][60][61] Thompson's total compensation for his 130-day tenure with Yahoo was at least $7.3 million.[62]

On July 15, 2012, Marissa Mayer was appointed president and CEO of Yahoo, effective July 17, 2012.[63][64]

In June 2013, Yahoo acquired blogging site Tumblr for $1.1 billion in cash, with Tumblr's CEO and founder David Karp continuing to run the site.[65][66][67][68] In July 2013, Yahoo announced plans to open an office in San Francisco.[69]

On August 2, 2013, Yahoo acquired Rockmelt; its staff was retained, but all of its existing products were terminated.[70]

Data collated by comScore during July 2013 revealed that, during the month, more people in the U.S. visited Yahoo websites than Google; the first time that Yahoo outperformed Google since 2011.[71] The data did not count mobile usage, nor Tumblr.[72]

Mayer also hired Katie Couric to be the anchor of a new online news operation and started an online food magazine. However, by January 2014, doubts about Mayer's progress emerged when Mayer fired her own first major hire, Henrique de Castro.[73]

On December 12, 2014, Yahoo acquired video advertising provider BrightRoll for $583 million.[74]

On November 21, 2014, Yahoo acquired Cooliris.[75]

Decline, security breaches, and sale

Main article: Yahoo! data breaches

By December 2015, Mayer was criticized as performance declined.[76][77][78][79] Mayer was ranked as the least likable CEO in tech.[80][81]

On February 2, 2016, Mayer announced layoffs amounting to 15% of the Yahoo! workforce.[82]

On July 25, 2016, Verizon Communications announced the acquisition of Yahoo's core Internet business for $4.83 billion.[83][84][85][86] The deal excluded Yahoo's 15% stake in Alibaba Group and 35.5% stake in Yahoo Japan.[87][88]

On February 21, 2017, as a result of the Yahoo data breaches, Verizon lowered its purchase price for Yahoo by $350 million and reached an agreement to share liabilities regarding the data breaches.[89][90]

On June 13, 2017, Verizon completed the acquisition of Yahoo and Marissa Mayer resigned.[91][92]

Yahoo, AOL, and HuffPost were to continue operating under their own names, under the umbrella of a new company, Oath Inc., later called Verizon Media.[93][94]

The parts of the original Yahoo! Inc. which were not purchased by Verizon Communications were renamed Altaba, which later liquidated, making a final distribution in October 2020.[95]

In September 2021, investment funds managed by Apollo Global Management acquired 90% of Yahoo.[3][96]

In November 2021, Yahoo announced that it was ceasing its operations in mainland China due to an increasingly challenging business and legal environment.[97]

Chief Executive Officers

Products and services

For a list of all current and defunct services offered by Yahoo, see List of Yahoo-owned sites and services.

Data breaches

Main article: Yahoo! data breaches

On September 22, 2016, Yahoo disclosed a data breach that occurred in late 2014, in which information associated with at least 500 million user accounts,[99][100] one of the largest breaches reported to date.[101] The United States indicted four men, including two employees of Russia's Federal Security Service (FSB), for their involvement in the hack.[102][103] On December 14, 2016, the company revealed that another separate data breach had occurred in 2014, with hackers obtaining sensitive account information, including security questions, to at least one billion accounts.[104] The company stated that hackers had utilized stolen internal software to forge HTTP cookies.[105][106]

On October 3, 2017, the company stated that all 3 billion of its user accounts were affected by the August 2013 theft.[107][108][109][110][111]

Criticism

Main article: Criticism of Yahoo!

DMCA notice to whistleblower

On November 30, 2009, Yahoo was criticized by the Electronic Frontier Foundation for sending a DMCA notice to whistleblower website "Cryptome" for publicly posting details, prices, and procedures on obtaining private information pertaining to Yahoo's subscribers.[112]

Censorship of private emails affiliated with Occupy Wall Street protests

After some concerns over censorship of private emails regarding a website affiliated with Occupy Wall Street protests were raised, Yahoo responded with an apology and explained it as an accident.[113][114][115]

The 2015 DublinLGBTQ Pride Festival, sponsored by Yahoo

On September 11, 2001, Yahoo! announced its partnership with FIFA for the 2002 FIFA World Cup and 2006 FIFA World Cup tournaments. It was one of FIFA's 15 partners at the tournaments. The deal included co-branding the organization's websites.[116]

Yahoo! sponsored the 2012 Sundance Film Festival.[117]

Logos and themes

The first Yahoo logo was established upon foundation of the company in 1994. It consists of the "Yahoo" wordmark which is colored black and is using the Times New Roman font, but it was later changed.

In March 1995, when the company changed its name to Yahoo, it introduced another logo which is briefly changed to a more elaborate text that includes an exclamation point at the end.

In August 1995, Yahoo changed its logo to a stylized yellow jumping "Y" figurine on a blue circle while the "Yahoo!" wordmark is written below.

On January 1, 1996, Yahoo introduced a simplified new logo that included the text "Yahoo" and an exclamation mark, both in red with a slight shadow behind the text.[118]

Yahoo! sign with address at its headquarters in 2007; it always used a purple sign despite the website itself having the red variant

By May 2009, Yahoo tweaked the logo by recoloring it from red to purple and removing the logo's outline and shadow. At the time, the purple logo was accompanied by a new slogan, "It's Y!ou." A shortened variant of the logo, consisting of only the letter "Y" and an exclamation point, was also used.[119]

On August 7, 2013, at around midnight EDT, Yahoo announced that the final version of the new logo would be revealed on September 5, 2013, at 4:00 a.m. UTC. In the period leading up to the unveiling of the new logo, the "30 Days of Change" campaign was introduced, whereby a variation of the logo was published every day for the 30 days following the announcement.[120][121] The new logo was eventually launched with an accompanying video that showed its digital construction, and Mayer published a personalized description of the design process on her Tumblr page.[122] Mayer explains:

So, one weekend this summer, I rolled up my sleeves and dove into the trenches with our logo design team . We spent the majority of Saturday and Sunday designing the logo from start to finish, and we had a ton of fun weighing every minute detail. We knew we wanted a logo that reflected Yahoo – whimsical, yet sophisticated. Modern and fresh, with a nod to our history. Having a human touch, personal. Proud.[123]

A Yahoo-branded PC keyboard

On September 19, 2013, Yahoo launched a new version of the "My Yahoo" personalized homepage. The redesign allows users to tailor a homepage with widgets that access features such as email accounts, calendars, Flickr and other Yahoo content, and Internet content. Users can also select "theme packs" that represent artists such as Polly Apfelbaum and Alec Monopoly, and bands such as Empire of the Sun.[124] Mayer then explained at a conference in late September 2013 that the logo change was the result of feedback from both external parties and employees.[125]

In September 2019 Yahoo changed its logo again for a "refreshed brand identity [that] is simpler and more flexible, and looks back to the original, quirky 1996 logo." The logo is a white text set against a purple background, with both the “y” and “!” of the logo reportedly set at an angle of 22.5 degrees. The logo was designed by Pentagram.[126]

  • Wordmark used from January 1, 1996, to September 4, 2013 (shown: purple variant used from 2009); red version still used by Yahoo! Japan

  • Yahoo's fifth and previous logo, September 2013–September 2019

  • Yahoo's sixth and current logo, September 2019–present

See also

References

  1. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K, Annual Report, Filing Date Mar 1, 2017". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  2. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-Q, Quarterly Report, Filing Date May 9, 2017". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  3. ^ abMihalcik, Carrie (September 1, 2021). "Yahoo has a new owner, again". CNET.
  4. ^"Verizon Communications, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 16, 2017"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  5. ^"Verizon Communications, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 27, 2017"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 2, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  6. ^"Verizon and all new Oath Inc. Story of Yahoo, AOL and Altaba – FlatFur Media". flatfur.com. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017. Retrieved August 16, 2017.
  7. ^Yahoo Commercial 2006 on YouTube
  8. ^Yahoo 'Flashing Lights' Commercial (1080p) on YouTube
  9. ^"Yahoo's Sale to Verizon Ends an Era for a Web Pioneer". The New York Times. July 25, 2016. Archived from the original on February 16, 2017. Retrieved February 23, 2017.
  10. ^Saurel, Sylvain (August 17, 2019). "6 Reasons Why Yahoo! Failed". Medium.
  11. ^McGoogan, Cara (July 25, 2016). "Yahoo: 9 reasons for the internet icon's decline". The Daily Telegraph. Archived from the original on April 17, 2018. Retrieved April 4, 2018.
  12. ^"The Glory That Was Yahoo". March 21, 2018.
  13. ^"Yahoo.com Traffic, Demographics and Competitors – Alexa". www.alexa.com.
  14. ^"Yahoo.com Analytics - Market Share Data". SimilarWeb.
  15. ^"Yahoo! Inc. – Company Timeline". Archived from the original on July 13, 2008. Retrieved July 19, 2016.. yhoo.client.shareholder.com
  16. ^Clark, Andrew (February 1, 2008). "How Jerry's guide to the world wide web became Yahoo". The Guardian. London. Archived from the original on October 5, 2013. Retrieved May 23, 2012.
  17. ^"Yahoo! celebrates 20th anniversary". Yahoo! News. March 1, 2015. Archived from the original on January 13, 2016.
  18. ^Romano, Andrew (March 1, 2015). "At 20, Yahoo celebrates and looks ahead". Yahoo!. Archived from the original on March 27, 2016.
  19. ^Clark, Andrew (February 1, 2008). "How Jerry's guide to the world wide web became Yahoo". The Guardian.
  20. ^Thomson, David G. (2006). Blueprint to a Billion. Wiley-Interscience. p. 155. ISBN .
  21. ^Trex, Ethan. "Jerry and David's Guide to the World Wide Web becomes Yahoo!". Blogs.static.mentalfloss.com. Archived from the original on March 16, 2010. Retrieved August 24, 2010.
  22. ^ abThe Yahoo Directory — Once The Internet’s Most Important Search Engine — Is To CloseArchived June 11, 2017, at the Wayback Machine September 26, 2014, retrieved in June 3, 2017
  23. ^Yahoo schließt seinen KatalogArchived May 18, 2017, at the Wayback Machine from golem.de, September 27, 2014, retrieved in June 3, 2017
  24. ^"This Day in History, January 18, 2017". CNBC. January 18, 2017.
  25. ^Gaffin, Adam (September 11, 1995). "Hello, Is Anyone Out There?". Network World.
  26. ^Gil, Paul (April 19, 2021). "What Does "Yahoo" Stand For?". Lifewire.
  27. ^Gurnitsky, Joanna. "What Does 'Yahoo' Stand For?". About.com. Archived from the original on April 11, 2012. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  28. ^"The History of Yahoo! – How It All Started ." Yahoo!. January 9, 2011. Archived from the original on January 9, 2011.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  29. ^Oppitz, Marcus; Tomsu, Peter (2017). Inventing the Cloud Century: How Cloudiness Keeps Changing Our Life, Economy and Technology. Springer Science+Business Media. p. 238. ISBN .
  30. ^"Yahoo! Search". Yahoo!. November 28, 1996. Archived from the original on November 28, 1996. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  31. ^"What is first mover?". SearchCIO. TechTarget. September 2005. Retrieved September 5, 2019.
  32. ^ ab"Yahoo! The kingmaker – Jul. 23, 1998".
  33. ^"AOL/Netscape merger presses smaller portals – Nov. 25, 1998".
  34. ^"Yahoo! still first portal call". BBC News. June 5, 1998. Archived from the original on November 24, 2017.
  35. ^"Yahoo! To Acquire Four11 Corporation" (Press release). October 8, 1997.
  36. ^"Yahoo! Still first portal call". BBC News. June 5, 1998.
  37. ^"Yahoo! buys GeoCities". CNN. January 28, 1999.
  38. ^"Yahoo to buy Broadcast.com for $5.7B". CNN. April 1, 1999.
  39. ^Linder, Karen (May 8, 2012). The Women of Berkshire Hathaway. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley & Sons. p. 199. ISBN .
  40. ^Naughton, John (July 2, 2000). "Why's Yahoo gone to Google? Search me". The Guardian.
  41. ^"Yahoo! Selects Google As Its Default Search Engine Provider" (Press release). Altaba. June 26, 2000.
  42. ^"Yahoo dumps Google search technology".
  43. ^Helft, Miguel (January 22, 2008). "Hundreds of Layoffs Expected at Yahoo". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 28, 2016.
  44. ^Isidore, Chris (February 1, 2008). "Microsoft bids $45 billion for Yahoo". CNN.
  45. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 425, Filing Date Feb 1, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  46. ^Swartz, Jon (May 6, 2008). "Microsoft drops pursuit of Yahoo, looks ahead". USA Today.
  47. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 16, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  48. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 12, 2008". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  49. ^"Yahoo rejects Microsoft approach". BBC News. February 11, 2008. Archived from the original on February 14, 2008. Retrieved February 17, 2008.
  50. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jan 15, 2009". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  51. ^"Job cuts help Yahoo! profits surge". BBC News. October 21, 2009. Archived from the original on May 11, 2011. Retrieved May 31, 2011.
  52. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Sep 7, 2011"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  53. ^"Yahoo reels as CEO Carol Bartz fired on the phone in sudden shake-up at floundering tech giant". NY Daily News. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 22, 2018.
  54. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K/A, Filing Date Apr 27, 2012"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  55. ^Swisher, Kara (April 5, 2012). "Exclusive: Yahoo's Chief Product Officer Blake Irving Resigns". All Things D. Archived from the original on January 4, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  56. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Apr 4, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  57. ^Liedtke, Michael (April 4, 2012). "Yahoo dumping 2,000 workers in latest purge". The Jakarta Post. Archived from the original on June 16, 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2012.
  58. ^ abSwisher, Kara (April 10, 2012). "It's Official: Yahoo Reorgs Itself Just Like We Said (Memo Time!)". All Things D. Archived from the original on December 20, 2012.
  59. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 14, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  60. ^"Yahoo! Names Fred Amoroso Chairman and Appoints Ross Levinsohn Interim CEO" (Press release). Yahoo!. May 13, 2012. Archived from the original on September 25, 2013. Retrieved July 2, 2012.
  61. ^Oreskovic, Alexei (May 10, 2012). "Yahoo CEO says he never provided a resume-source". Reuters. Archived from the original on July 26, 2012. Retrieved July 22, 2012.
  62. ^Pepitone, Julianne (May 14, 2012). "Ousted Yahoo CEO will get no severance". CNN. Archived from the original on May 17, 2012.
  63. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 19, 2012". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  64. ^Matt McGee, Search Engine Land. "Confirmed: Marissa Mayer Leaving Google For Yahoo CEO RoleArchived March 28, 2017, at the Wayback Machine." July 16, 2012. Retrieved March 27, 2017.
  65. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jun 20, 2013"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  66. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date May 20, 2013"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  67. ^Lublin, Joann S.; Efrati, Amir; Ante, Spencer E. (May 19, 2013). "Yahoo Deal Shows Power Shift". The Wall Street Journal. New York. Archived from the original on February 3, 2015. Retrieved May 20, 2013.
  68. ^"Yahoo to buy Tumblr – reports". 3 News NZ. May 20, 2013. Archived from the original on October 8, 2017. Retrieved October 8, 2017.
  69. ^Yahoo Plans Splashy New San Francisco Digs (and Neon Billboard Dreams) – Kara Swisher – NewsArchived July 28, 2013, at the Wayback Machine. AllThingsD (July 26, 2013). Retrieved on August 16, 2013.
  70. ^"Yahoo Has Acquired Rockmelt, Apps To Shut Down On August 31st". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  71. ^Hicken, Melanie (August 21, 2013). "Yahoo beats Google in credit one unsecured visa for building credit for first time in 2 years". CNN. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018.
  72. ^
  73. ^GOEL, VINDU; MILLER, CLAIRE CAIN (January 16, 2014). "Bumps on a Road to Revival for Yahoo". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 24, 2014.
  74. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 10-K, Annual Report, Filing Date Feb 27, 2015". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  75. ^By TechCrunch "[1]Archived July 6, 2017, at the Wayback Machine."
  76. ^McGregor, Jenna (December 7, 2015). "Scrutiny on Yahoo's Marissa Mayer grows more intense". Chicago Tribune. Archived from the original on December 8, 2015. Retrieved December 7, 2015.
  77. ^Todd, Deborah M. (December 5, 2015). "Yahoo board in final talks on future of company". Reuters.
  78. ^Campos, Rodrigo (December 2, 2015). "With buyback help, Yahoo stock has soared under Mayer". Reuters. Archived from the original on December 6, 2015.
  79. ^Goliya, Kshitiz; Nayak, Malathi (December 7, 2015). "Verizon could explore Yahoo's Internet business, CFO says". Reuters. Archived from the original on December 9, 2015.
  80. ^Mejia, Zameena (May 31, 2017). "Why Marissa Mayer is the 'least likable' CEO in tech". CNBC.
  81. ^"The rise and fall of Marissa Mayer, the once-beloved CEO of Yahoo now pursuing her own venture". Business Insider. February 11, 2020.
  82. ^Kasperkevic, Jana; Wong, Julia Carrie (February 2, 2016). "Yahoo cutting workforce by 15% after announcing $4.4bn loss". The Guardian.
  83. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 25, 2016". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved April 30, 2018.
  84. ^Goel, Vindu; Merced, Michael J. De La (July 24, 2016). "Yahoo's Sale to Verizon Ends an Era for a Web Pioneer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on July 27, 2016. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  85. ^Lien, Tracey (July 25, 2016). "Verizon buys Yahoo for $4.8 billion, and it's giving Yahoo's brand another chance". Archived from the original on July 25, 2016. Retrieved July 25, 2016.
  86. ^Griswold, Alison. "The stunning collapse of Yahoo's valuation". Archived from the original on July 30, 2016. Retrieved August 6, 2016.
  87. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form DEFA14A, Filing Date Aug 1, 2016"(PDF). secdatabase.com. Archived(PDF) from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  88. ^"Verizon, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 25, 2016". secdatabase.com. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  89. ^Moritz, Scott; Sherman, Alex; Womack, Brian (February 15, 2017). "Verizon Said to Near Yahoo Deal at Lower Price After Hacks". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017.
  90. ^Snider, Mike (February 21, 2017). "Verizon shaves $350 million from Yahoo price". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 22, 2017. Retrieved February 21, 2017.
  91. ^Kharpal, Arjun (June 13, 2017). "Verizon completes acquisition of Yahoo as Marissa Mayer resigns". CNBC. Archived from the original on June 13, 2017. Retrieved June 13, 2017.
  92. ^Fiegerman, Seth (June 13, 2017). "End of an era: Yahoo is no longer an independent company". CNN. Archived from the original on June 13, 2017.
  93. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Jul 27, 2017". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018.
  94. ^Chokshi, Niraj; Goel, Vindu (April 3, 2017). "Verizon Announces New Name Brand for AOL and Yahoo: Oath". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 4, 2017.
  95. ^"Altaba Announces Liquidating Distribution of $8.33 Per Share" (Press release). Business Wire. October 26, 2020.
  96. ^"Apollo Funds Complete Acquisition of Yahoo" (Press release). Apollo Global Management. September 1, 2021.
  97. ^Soo, Zen (November 3, 2021). "Yahoo pulls out of China, citing 'challenging' environment". Associated Press. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  98. ^Lee, Wendy (June 13, 2017). "Verizon-Yahoo deal is official; Marissa Mayer resigns". San Francisco Chronicle. Archived from the original on August 8, 2017.
  99. ^"Yahoo! Inc, Form 8-K, Current Report, Filing Date Sep 22, 2016". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Archived from the original on April 29, 2018.
  100. ^Perlroth, Nicole (September 22, 2016). "Yahoo Says Hackers Stole Data on 500 Million Users in 2014". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 22, 2016.
  101. ^"Yahoo 'state' hackers stole data from 500 million users". BBC News. September 23, 2016. Archived from the original on September 23, 2016.
  102. ^Goel, Vindu (March 15, 2017). "Russian Agents Were Behind Yahoo Breach, U.S. Says". The New York Times. Archived from the original on March 16, 2017.
  103. ^Lawrence, Dune. "Here's How Russian Agents Hacked 500 Million Yahoo Users". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on March 16, 2017.
  104. ^Goel, Vindu (December 14, 2016). "Yahoo Says 1 Billion User Accounts Were Hacked". The New York Times. Archived from the original on December 14, 2016.
  105. ^Gallagher, Sean (February 15, 2017). "Yahoo reveals yahoo com usa breachiness to users victimized by forged cookies [Updated]". Ars Technica. Archived from the original on February 21, 2017.
  106. ^Snider, Mike; Weise, Elizabeth (September 22, 2016). "500 million Yahoo accounts breached". USA Today. Archived from the original on September 9, 2017.
  107. ^McMillan, Robert; Knutson, Ryan (October 3, 2017). "Yahoo Triples Estimate of Breached Accounts to 3 Billion". The Wall Street Journal.
  108. ^"Verizon Communications Inc., Form 8-K, Current Report". U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. October 3, 2017. Archived from the original on May 1, 2018.
  109. ^"Yahoo provides notice to additional users affected by previously disclosed 2013 data theft" (Press release). Verizon Media. October 3, 2017. Archived from the original on October 3, 2017.
  110. ^McCrank, John; Bartz, Diane (October 3, 2017). "Former Equifax chief apologizes to Congress over hack". Reuters. Archived from the original on November 10, 2017.
  111. ^Moritz, Scott (October 3, 2017). "Yahoo Triples Likely Scope of 2013 Hack to 3 Billion Users". Bloomberg News. Archived from the original on October 3, 2017.
  112. ^"Yahoo Tries to Hide Snoop Service Price List". Electronic Frontier Foundation. November 30, 2009. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012.
  113. ^Fang, Lee (September 20, 2011). "Yahoo Appears To Be Censoring Email Messages About Wall Street Protests (Updated)". ThinkProgress. Center for American Progress Action Fund. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012.
  114. ^TheFreak (September 2011). "Yahoo Censoring "Occupy Wall Street" Protest Messages". Videosift. Sift Partners, Inc. Archived from the original on June 20, 2012. Retrieved September 16, 2012.
  115. ^Nelson, Miranda (September 20, 2011). "Yahoo admits blocking Wall Street protest emails, says censorship optum cancer care tenaya "not intentional"". The Georgia Straight. Vancouver. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012.
  116. ^"Yahoo! And FIFA Form Expansive Global Relationship For Soccer's FIFA World Cup™, The World's Biggest Sporting Event | Altaba Inc". www.altaba.com.
  117. ^"Yahoo! Partners with the 2012 Sundance Film Festival". news.yahoo.com.
  118. ^"Yahoo Logo Design, Logo Design History". LogoOrange.com. Archived from the original on September 29, 2011.
  119. ^"Y – Yahoo". All Acronyms. 2012. Archived from the original on December 21, 2012.
  120. ^Swartz, Jon (August 7, 2013). "Yahoo is getting a new logo – in a month". USA Today. Archived from the original on November 26, 2013.
  121. ^Knight, Shawn (August 7, 2013). "Yahoo's 30 days of change campaign will end with new logo design". TechSpot. Archived from the original on August 10, 2013. Retrieved August 14, 2013.
  122. ^Newton, Casey (September 5, 2013). "Yahoo reveals its new logo". The Verge. Vox Media, Inc.Archived from the original on September 20, 2013.
  123. ^OREMUS, WILL (September 5, 2013). "Yahoo's New Logo Is Another Win for Marissa Mayer". Slate.
  124. ^Perez, Sarah (September 19, 2013). "Yahoo Resurrects The Personalized Homepage With "My Yahoo" Revamp". TechCrunch. Archived from the original on September 23, 2013.
  125. ^Edwards, Victoria (September 21, 2013). "6 Things We Learned From Marissa Mayer and Mark Zuckerberg at TechCrunch Disrupt 2013". Search Engine Watch. Archived from the original on September 24, 2013.
  126. ^"Yahoo Brand Identity". Pentagram.

External links

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yahoo!

Yahoo Answers to end as Trump fans see plot to “silence conservatives”

Illustration of a question mark and exclamation point on a wooden floor, leaning against a wall.
with 198 posters participating

Yahoo Answers is shutting down on May 4, 2021, the Verizon-owned Yahoo announced this week. The 16-year-old yahoo com usa service will enter read-only mode on April 20, preventing users from posting new questions or answering other users' questions, Yahoo said. On the May 4 shutdown date, the website will no longer be accessible, and the URL will redirect to the Yahoo homepage, Yahoo said. No other Yahoo services are affected by this announcement.

Just why people still use Yahoo Answers is a question that probably lacks a satisfying answer. One Ars colleague suggested that I format this article "as a question followed by a bunch of poorly written responses that don't quite answer the question." Instead of that, let's take a look at some of the recent questions that have risen to the top or near the top of the Yahoo Answers homepage.

The shutdown announcement prompted anger from people asking if Yahoo Answers is being "shut to silence conservatives" and for recommendations of other sites that post "the truth regarding the left's degeneracy." Another asked whether former President Donald Trump should buy Yahoo to prevent the shutdown. Others wanted to know whether the US can survive Biden's presidency and whether Democrats will ever "admit" that the election was rigged (it wasn't).

Recent questions listed on the homepage include:

  • "Will America survive 4 years of Joe Biden?"
  • "Can you point me to another site like yahoo answers where I can post about the truth regarding the left's degeneracy and ruining of the USA?"
  • "Will liberals cry when Trump wins in 2024?"
  • "I think George Floyd died from HEALTH ISSUES?"
  • "Should Trump buy Yahoo immediately to prevent Answers from being shut down?"
  • "Why do I need ID to buy firearm if I do t need one to vote?"
  • "Why does Joe stutter so much like a retard and looks older than the tales from the crypt keeper?"
  • "Closing of 'Yahoo! answers' means 'once again we lost freedom of speech'?"
  • "Why do Donald Trump and Republicans hate minorities and love white supremacists?"
  • "Is Yahoo Answers being shut to silence conservatives?"
  • "As Yahoo! Answers prepares to shut down, how will conservatives spin the decision as an attempt to censor only conservatives?"
  • "70,000,000 people voted for Trump. They can't all be stupid, can they?"
  • "Do you agree with liberals who say Florida will be under water by 2050?"
  • "Will Democrats ever admit that the election was rigged?"
  • "Will Trump's new social media platform host a Q&A so we can keep the dialogue going? And will comments to news stories return?"

There was also one "question" falsely claiming that only 1.4 million Jews died in the Holocaust instead of the generally accepted estimate of 6 million.

Advertisement

Yahoo’s final answers

Yahoo previously shut down Yahoo Groups in 2019 and deleted everything after giving users a chance to download their own content.

Anyone who wants to download their Yahoo Answers content must make a request using the instructions available at this link by June 30. Yahoo said that "it can take up to 30 days to receive your content download." The data will be provided in JSON format.

"Where should I go when I have questions in the future?" is one of the questions Yahoo posed and answered in its FAQ about the shutdown. The FAQ suggested visiting Yahoo Search "for answers and information from the web" or the Yahoo COVID page for "specific info and resources around the Coronavirus pandemic."

Источник: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2021/04/yahoo-answers-to-end-as-trump-fans-see-plot-to-silence-conservatives/

Yahoo.com has redesigned its homepage to make it more appealing to a new generation of the online audience. Thanks to the redesign, the oldest web portal got a simplified, crisper look as well as more social-media feel, which is believed to help the website deliver consistent user experience across desktop computers, laptops, tablets, and smartphones. So far, Yahoo has rolled out the new look only in the U.S.
Over the past time the popularity of the Yahoo’s portal was declining—partly, due to the its old-fashioned outlay. The team behind the Yahoo led by the relatively recently appointed CEO Marissa Mayer decided to introduce some evolutionary rather than revolutionary changes to improve user experience.

Pic.: Yahoo! redesigned page

First and foremost it’s a fresh foundation for a new Yahoo experience. Overall the design is streamlined for everyday use and focused on what matters most to our how to make cash advance using credit card is the content,” commented Yahoo design director Jackie Goldberg.

The refreshed homepage was introduced last Wednesday, February 20, following the design and function updates of Yahoo Mail and a new Flickr app. While paying tribute to the previous version’s style and authentic editor-picked content strategy, the refreshed page has a social-media twist with its no-bottom news feed, which is updated automatically. Readers can view the latest news in the All Stories section or choose a specific category, Business, Celebrities, Politics, Sports, and more.

Each news summary in the feed can be shared via Twitter, Facebook or email using the built-in functions. The page “remembers” a user’s share preferences and delivers more news on the selected themes. Since the updated page has integration with Facebook, it features more news pieces related to the pages the user has liked on Facebook. The updated homepage also serves as a great platform for delivering targeted ads tailored to consumer’s interests and preferences. The ads will be easily recognizable and won’t be confused with the new content.

The redesign has been introduced seven months after Yahoo! got a new CEO, Marissa Mayer, who had been Google’s vice president of location and search.

Related posts

Источник: https://popsop.com/2013/02/the-u-s-yahoo-com-homepage-has-been-redesigned-with-a-social-media-twist/

Yahoo is the third major US tech platform to exit China in the past month

Yahoo announced today (Nov. 2) that it will no longer operate in China as the country tightens data and privacy regulations that are making it increasingly difficult for US companies to operate there.

“In recognition of the increasingly challenging business and legal environment in China, Yahoo’s suite of services will no longer be accessible from mainland China as of November 1,” the tech and media company said in a statement. Yahoo has been downsizing its operations in China for years and its email and news services have not been operating in the country since 2013.

The move by Yahoo is the third exit by a major US tech platform from China in a month, following LinkedIn’s decision to remove its site on Oct. 14 and Epic Games’s Nov. 1 announcement that it will stop testing a Chinese version of the video game Fortnite. The exits come as China’s president Xi Jinping pursues a tech crackdown that has affected both domestic and foreign companies.

China’s new data and privacy law went into effect this week

China’s Personal Information and Protection Law, which took effect yesterday is part of a series of sweeping measures instituted by the Communist Party to tighten regulations of the country’s private sector. This most recent law seeks to regulate the way technology companies collect biometric data and personal information on users.

While Yahoo didn’t mention this particular law when it announced it is pulling out of China entirely, the new privacy regulations are expected to have a major effect on the way tech companies operate in the country. Companies that don’t comply with the new data and privacy regulations could be fined up to 5% of their last year’s turnover, and even data processing activities that happen outside of China are subject to jurisdiction.

“There’s just so much uncertainty now with media and tech companies in China that it doesn’t make a lot of financial sense to maintain such a large presence when you run into so much red tape,” said Brandon Hughes, the founder of consulting group FAO Global. He added that it likely doesn’t help that Yahoo’s business has been declining for some time. Although Yahoo was only worth about 1% of its peak valuation when Apollo Global Management bought the firm in May, the company claims 900 million monthly users for its email and sites that focus on sports and finance.

In an Oct. 14 blog post, LinkedIn said it had decided to sunset a localized version of LinkedIn in the country due to a “significantly more challenging operating environment and greater compliance requirements in China.” Epic Games didn’t offer a reason for why it was shutting down Fortnite servers in China, but the country’s targeting of the video game market may have something to do with it. In August China announced young people under 18 would only be allowed to play video games for three hours each week.

Tech crackdown is more focused on Chinese firms

Despite the recent exit of a few US tech firms, Hughes said China’s tech crackdown is likely more focused on the growing political influence of the country’s own tech giants than anything else. In July China blocked the ride-hailing app Didi from app stores after accusing it of improperly collecting users’ personal data just shortly before it was set to IPO in the US. Alibaba’s IPO was also thwarted after its powerful chief Jack Ma criticized Chinese government officials  in October 2020.

“I think the CCP is taking advantage of this incredibly disruptive period to pack in regulations that were long overdue,” Hughes said of the new rules, but added the public influence of the company’s tech leaders likely catalyzed China’s regulatory plans. “It’s becoming a political situation as these companies are taking a stance on certain government policies,” he added.

Источник: https://qz.com/2083556/yahoo-is-the-latest-us-tech-company-to-announce-its-china-exit/

Yahoo 'secretly monitored emails on behalf of the US government'

Yahoo last year secretly built a custom software program to search all of its customers’ incoming emails for specific information at the request of US intelligence officials, according to a report.

The company complied with a classified US government directive, scanning hundreds of millions of Yahoo Mail accounts at the behest of the National Security Agency (NSA) or FBI, two former employees and bank of america student loan refinance rates third person who knew about the program told Reuters.

Some surveillance experts said this represents the first known case of a US internet company agreeing to a spy agency’s demand by searching all arriving messages, as opposed to examining stored messages or scanning a small number of accounts in real time.

It is not known what information intelligence officials were looking for, only that they wanted Yahoo to search for a set of characters. That could mean a phrase in an email or an attachment, said the sources.

Reuters was unable to determine what data Yahoo may have handed over, if any, and whether intelligence officials had approached other email providers besides Yahoo with this kind of request.

According to the two former employees, Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer’s decision to obey the directive troubled some senior executives and led to the June 2015 departure of the chief information security officer, Alex Stamos, who now heads security at Facebook.

“Yahoo is a law abiding company, and complies with the laws of the United States,” the company said in a brief statement in response to Reuters questions about the demand. Yahoo declined any further comment.

Andrew Crocker, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said that the use of the word “directive” to describe the program indicated that the request may have been ordered under the section 702 of the 2008 Fisa Amendments Act, which allows the government to target non-US citizens abroad for surveillance.

Revelations by Edward Snowden about the Prism and Upstream programs – of which the Yahoo program looks like a hybrid, Crocker said – show that US citizens were also subject to mass surveillance.

“The fourth amendment and attendant privacy concerns are quite staggering,” Crocker said. “It sounds like they are scanning all emails, even inside the US … the fourth amendment protects that fully. It’s hard to see how the government justifies requiring Yahoo to search emails like that; there is no warrant that could possibly justify scanning all emails.”

Yahoo security initially ‘thought hackers had broken in’

Sources said the program was discovered by Yahoo’s security team in May 2015, within weeks of its installation. Staff initially thought hackers had broken in.

When Stamos found out that Mayer had authorized the program, he resigned as chief information security officer and told his subordinates that he had been left out of a decision that hurt users’ security, sources said. Due to a programming flaw, he told them, hackers could have accessed the stored emails.

Stamos declined a request by the Guardian for an interview.

Stamos’s announcement in June 2015 that he had joined Facebook did not mention any problems with Yahoo.

The NSA referred questions to the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, which declined to comment.

The demand to search Yahoo Mail accounts came in the form of a classified directive sent to the company’s legal team, according to the three people familiar with the matter. US phone and internet companies are known to have handed over bulk customer data to intelligence agencies. But some former government officials and private surveillance experts said they had not previously seen either such a broad directive for real-time web collection or one that required the creation of a new computer program.

It is deeply disappointing. Post-Snowden, customers are counting on tech companies to stand up to novel spying demands
Patrick Toomey, ACLU staff attorney

“I’ve never seen that, a wiretap in real time on a ‘selector’,” said Albert Gidari, a lawyer who represented phone and internet companies on surveillance issues for 20 years before moving to Stanford University in 2016. A selector refers to a type of search term used to zero in on specific information. “It would be really difficult for a provider to do that,” he added.

Experts said it was likely that the NSA or FBI had approached other internet companies with the same demand, since they evidently did not know what email accounts were being used by the target. The NSA usually makes requests for domestic surveillance through the FBI, so it is hard to discern which agency is seeking the information.

Reuters was unable to confirm whether the 2015 demand went to other companies, or if any complied.

Google, whose Gmail is the world’s largest email service, said on Tuesday that it hadn’t received a similar spying request from the request from the US government. If it had, Google said, its response would be: “No way.” Microsoft, whose email service also is larger than Yahoo, also said it has “never engaged in the secret scanning of email traffic.”

Twitter, which doesn’t provide email service but does allow users to exchange direct messages, likewise said it has never received such a request and would challenge it in court if it did.

A Facebook spokesperson said: “Facebook has never received a request like the one described in these news reports from any government, and if we did we would fight it.”

Apple fought a legal case against a similar request by the US government in February after refusing to give access to the phone used by one the attackers in the 2015 San Bernardino massacre.

In a statement, the company said: “We have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.”

In a further statement, Apple said “We have never received a request of this type. If we were to receive one, we would oppose it in court.”

Companies are obliged to comply with government requests

Under laws including the 2008 amendments to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, intelligence agencies can ask US phone and internet companies to provide customer data to aid foreign intelligence-gathering efforts for a variety of reasons, including prevention of terrorist attacks.

Disclosures by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden and others have exposed the extent of electronic yahoo com usa and led US authorities to modestly scale back some of the programs, in part to protect privacy rights.

Technology companies – including Yahoo – have challenged some classified surveillance before the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (Fisa), a secret tribunal.

Some Fisa experts said Yahoo could have tried to fight last year’s directive on at least two grounds: the breadth of the demand and the necessity of writing a special program to search all customers’ emails in transit.

In the Apple case, the FBI dropped the lawsuit when it unlocked the phone with the help of a third party, so no precedent was set.

Other Fisa experts have defended Yahoo’s decision to comply, saying nothing prohibited the surveillance court from ordering a search for a specific term instead of a specific account. So-called “upstream” bulk collection from phone carriers based on content was found to be legal, they said, and the same logic could apply to web companies’ mail.

As tech companies become better at encrypting data, they are likely to face more such requests from spy agencies. Former NSA general counsel Stewart Baker said email providers “have the power to encrypt it all, and with that comes added responsibility to do some of the work that had been done by the intelligence agencies”.

ACLU staff attorney Patrick Toomey said that the demand made on Yahoo was “unprecedented” and potentially unconstitutional. He said it represented “a new surveillance paradigm, one in which computers constantly scan our communications for information of interest to the government”.

“It is deeply disappointing that Yahoo simply chose to comply with this sweeping surveillance order,” Toomey said. “In the post-Snowden world, customers are counting on technology companies to stand up to novel spying demands in court, because customers themselves have no opportunity to challenge these invasions of their privacy.”

Senator Ron Wyden told the Guardian: “It is a fact that collection under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act has a significant impact on Americans’ privacy. It is public record that this expansive surveillance program is the basis for warrantless searches of Americans’ emails, and that the government has never even counted how many.

“The NSA has said that it only targets individuals under Section 702 by searching for email addresses and similar identifiers. If that has changed, the executive branch has an obligation to notify the public.”

Marissa Mayer ‘did not involve the security team’

Mayer and other executives ultimately decided to comply with the directive last year rather than fight it, in part because they thought they would lose, said the people familiar with the matter.

Yahoo in 2007 fought a Fisa demand that it conduct searches on specific email accounts without a court-approved warrant. Details of the case remain sealed, but a partially redacted published opinion showed Yahoo’s challenge was unsuccessful.

Some Yahoo employees were upset about the decision not to contest the more recent directive and thought the company could have prevailed, the sources said. They were also upset that Mayer and Yahoo general counsel Ron Bell did not involve the company’s security team in the process, instead asking Yahoo’s email engineers to write a program to siphon off messages containing the character string the spies sought and store them for remote retrieval, according to the sources.

In a separate incident, Yahoo last month said “state-sponsored” hackers had gained access to 500m customer accounts in 2014.

The revelations have brought new scrutiny to Yahoo’s security practices as the company tries to complete a deal to sell its core business to Verizon for $4.8bn.

Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/oct/04/yahoo-secret-email-program-nsa-fbi
yahoo com usa

0 Replies to “Yahoo com usa”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *