tarrant county college spring break 2015

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Progress.................................................10

Annual Report

Tulsa Community College

You Can. We'll Help.

You show up, we’ll provide the expertise, guidance and support you need to create your future. Let’s go.

Apply to TCCRequest Information

First-Name Basis

Your Admissions Counselor will get to know you, your hopes, your needs, and then work with you on your pathway to accomplish all of it.

Meet Your Admissions Counselor

TCC students in science class earning their degree

Student-Teacher Ratio

Small classes allow more time with professors who are experts in their fields.

Degrees & Certificates

Whatever your academic goal, we can help you complete it.

Programs A-Z

TCC’s four campuses offer convenient access, resources and amenities.

All Locations

Student wearing a backpack walking outside at TCC Metro Campus

Metro Campus

TCC’s Metro Campus is easy to get to with accessible parking and sits in close proximity to all downtown Tulsa has to offer.

909 South Boston Avenue, Tulsa, OK 74119

Student sitting on the lawn studying at the TCC Northeast Campus

Northeast Campus

Tucked into north Tulsa, our Northeast Campus offers access to all our programs and resources to make sure you get a quality education close to home.

3727 East Apache Street, Tulsa, OK 74115

TCC Southeast students sitting outside visiting between classes

Southeast Campus

TCC’s largest, the scenic Southeast campus serves south Tulsa and is easily accessible via Highway 169.

10300 East 81st Street, Tulsa, OK 74133

TCC West campus students sitting outside talking

West Campus

TCC’s West Campus sits nestled between Sand Springs and Tulsa, providing easy access to higher education opportunities without long commutes for the local population.

7505 West 41st Street South, Tulsa, OK 74107

Happening at Tulsa Community College

News

One of the largest grants a community college can receive, it supports institutions serving a high number of students from lower socioeconomic...

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Events

November 15, 2021 - January 18, 2022

(All day)

All Locations

Events

November 24, 2021 - November 28, 2021

(All day)

All Locations

News

Across the county, mental health concerns and student distress were increasing before COVID. To address those needs, TCC had already taken steps...

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Ask an Admissions Counselor

I don’t live in Tulsa County. How can I make College more affordable, and what are my financial aid options?

Great news, just because you don’t live in Tulsa County doesn’t mean you can’t go to school for free. We have great options. Talk to our TCC Financial Aid and Scholarships to get started.

Financial Aid & Scholarships

Источник: https://www.tulsacc.edu/
Success .................................................16

TarrantCountyCollege at a Glance...................................24

In Every Issue

News Briefs ......................................................................26

TCCD Facilities..................................................................32

Fine Arts Events at TCC......................................................34

Access

Progress

Success

In the News......................................................................35

TarrantCountyCollege’s commitment to the

community and the environment is reflected

in the use of recycled paper for this issue of

Projection magazine.

Want to keep up on the latest with TCC

Stay connected through social media.

News From the Inside.......................................................36

The Foundation ................................................................37

Projection

Vol. XLVI, No 1 Winter 2011

Produced for the friends, faculty, and staff of

TCC by the Offce of Public Relations and

Marketing and other contributors.

Editor:

Cacy Barnard

Editorial Contributors:

Cacy Barnard,

Connie Helbing, David House, Ann

Genett-Schrader and Rita L.B. Parson

Photographers:

DeeDra Parrish and Glen E. Ellman

Designers:

Monica Lea, Angel BriseÑo

and Brandon Tucker

PROJECTION is published by

TarrantCountyCollege at:

Projection

1500 Houston Street

Fort Worth, TX 76102-6524

Are you a TCC graduate

Register for the Online Alumni Community at www.tccd.edu/alumni

Role and Scope

The College implements its mission through

a clearly defined set of programs, services,

and partnerships that include:

∙ University transfer programs;

∙ Workforce education programs;

∙ Developmental courses;

∙ Adult literacy courses;

∙ Continuing Education and

community services;

∙An extensive curriculum; a highly qualified,

enthusiastic, innovative, faculty and staff;

appropriate technology, equipment, and

learning resources; diverse modes of

instruction and delivery; support services

to foster student success; work and

partnership in support of the cultural and

economic development of the community;

• A commitment to institutional effectiveness

– an ongoing process of self-examination,

self-improvement, and an unending pursuit

of excellence.

Mission Statement

TarrantCountyCollege provides affordable

and open access to quality teaching and

learning.

TarrantCountyCollege

is an Equal Opportunity Institution that

provides educational and employment

opportunities on the basis of merit and

without discrimination because of race, color,

religion, sex, age, national origin, veteran

status or disability.

From the Editor

Cacy Barnard

Projection Editor

Good, better, best. Never let it rest. ‘Til your good is

better and your better is best.

Applicable socially, personally and professionally,

these words may be the single most impactful piece of

advice I have ever received.

And as we reflect on both the happenings at Tarrant

CountyCollege in the past year and the vision for our

future, I cannot think of a motto that better matches the

direction of TCC as a whole.

This type of mindset is, and will continue to be,

instrumental to the effectiveness of our faculty and

staff as thousands of individuals increasingly look to

the College for education and support. In turn, it will

also be crucial to our students as we, together, strive for

continued progress.

Though TCC has developed many new resources

and tools within the past year, each of them are building

News

blocks toward one central vision of student access and

success, as you’ll see in the pages ahead. With this

common goal, teamwork serves as invaluable asset and

driving force behind TarrantCountyCollege’s recent

successes–ranging from the establishment of new

scholarship programs to the exemplary work of student

writers–that are outlined in this issue.

As we move forward, no matter the current

success of an individual or program, we know there is

always room for progress. And oftentimes, this progress

can result from simply considering fresh ideas and

viewpoints.

So when we start to settle for merely “good,” let’s

vow to remember that our good can always be better.

And then let’s ask: Is that better our very best

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 1


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High School Outreach

Number of Graduating Seniors Reached

Fort Worth

4000

Arlington

18,325

Keller

Mansfield

3000 H.E.B.

Birdville

Grapevine-Colleyville

Crowley

2000 Carroll

Eagle Mountain-Saginaw

Northwest

White Settlement

Burleson

1000

Aledo

Kennedale

Azle Everman

Lake Worth

297

505 345 344

204 165 139 Castleberry

3,529

3,214

1,620

1,546

1,304

1,268

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Community Outreach

Winter 2011

www.tccd.edu

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Corporate Services

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companies.

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Small Business Development Center

21

During 2009-2010 the SBDC assisted with:

164

Assisted with buying

and selling 27 businesses

New business starts 27

Jobs created

20

Jobs retained

Counseled:

438individuals and businesses in TarrantCounty.

Loans and equity from clients

Logged direct hours of counseling time.

$2,980,000 1,523

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 3


4 Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 5


Marine Creek

Collegiate High School

Imparts Early College-Going Culture

by Rita L.B. Parson

Marine Creek Collegiate High School students in class during their first semester.

hen Ricardo and Elena Aleman pursuits would impact the whole family.

sent their twin daughters, Alondra The twins are among the 38

and Andrea to Marine Creek high school freshmen attending the

Collegiate High School, little did they first Early College High School in

know that their daughters’ educational TarrantCounty, a cooperative effort

between TCC’s Northwest

Campus and the Lake Worth

Independent School District.

By participating in this

program for the next four

years, the Alemans and their

classmates will have the

opportunity to earn both their

high school diplomas and

associate of arts degrees

from TarrantCountyCollege.

Their pursuit of

higher education has had an

unforeseen benefit. It has

inspired their Spanish-speaking mother

to enroll in English classes at TCC.

It is her first step toward her goal to

become an elementary school teacher.

“It is important to learn English

to be able to communicate with my

daughters,” said the elder Aleman,

using her daughter to translate. “I plan

to keep taking classes and to be a

lifelong learner. It is very important to

Photos by DeeDra Parrish

never stop studying because every day

we learn something different.”

The Early College High School

initiative was launched in Texas in

2004 as a unique public-private

alliance to increase the number of

high school graduates while improving

their success in college, career and

life. The initiative targets students who

historically are underrepresented in

the college-going population.

Benefits include dual credit at no

cost to students, a seamless transition

from high school to college, and rigorous

instruction and accelerated courses.

Located on or near college campuses,

about 50 early college high schools

are operating throughout the state.

“The Early College High School

philosophy fits well with TCC’s Vision

2015 Strategic Plan, Achieving the

Dream, and other success initiatives,”

said Northwest President Elva LeBlanc.

“Northwest Campus has excellent

partnerships with its area school

districts. This program helps us to

create the ‘attending college’ culture

at all eight of them.”

LeBlanc said benefits of the

program span several levels. “It has

strengthened our partnership with

the public schools which is extremely

important to us,” she said. Additionally,

“the students’ parents, and the entire

community of Lake Worth have gone

the extra mile to support this effort.”

Students spend the first two years

primarily taking high school classes

with a cohort of their high school

classmates in a separate environment.

To further distinguish them from their

college peers, students wear school

uniforms in the initial years.

“We want to start them slowly. They

take a few college hours as freshmen

and a few more as sophomores,” said

Amy Moore, Marine Creek principal.

“By the time they are juniors and

seniors, they are mainstreamed with

other college students.”

The stair-step program that allows

them to earn five college credits their

first year is key. “We want to help them

develop and be successful, gaining

more freedom as they promote to each

grade level,” Moore said. “We want to

give them a more traditional college

experience. By their last two years,

they will be in class with only one or

two high school classmates and the

majority of the class will be traditional

college students.”

Student success is fostered by

academic and social support services

such as the mandatory summer Bridge

Program. The three-week program

helps students as they transition

and learn about the college culture.

Although TCC is working with

the Fort Worth Independent School

District to expand the program to

students at Diamond Hill-Jarvis

High School, it will always remain

a small school, adding about 100

students per grade level until

reaching a maximum enrollment of

400, said Gary Goodwin, Northwest

vice president of Continuing Education

Services.

Goodwin said he expects continued

interest in the program. “When parents

understand they are getting two years

of college at no cost, they understand

the implications of that and expect their

kids to participate,” said Goodwin.

Parents also understand they

have a role to play. “I support them in

their efforts because it is important

to study,” said Elena Aleman, whose

daughter, Andrea, likes English and

biology while daughter Alondra enjoys

science and aspires to be a plastic

surgeon. “Studying will make them

better students and prepare them for

a better career.”

6 Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 7


GED test example questions

1. Math: Byron purc

hased a $5,000 certificate of deposit (CD) at his local bank. The CD will pay him 7% simple interest.

How much INTEREST, in dollars, will Byron have earned from his CD at the end of a two-year period

Answer: $700

simple interest = principal x rate x time

simple interest = $5,000 x 0.07 x 2

simple interest = $700

2.

Math: A painter mixes gallons of paint in a large cylindrical bucket so that there will be no difference in color among individual

gallons. If one gallon of paint has a volume of approximately 4,000 cm3, what is the maximum number of whole gallons of paint

that can be poured into the bucket

A. 6

B. 14

C. 18

D. 22

E. 74

Answer: C

Volume of bucket: (3.14) x (20)² x (60) = 75,360 cm³

75,360 ÷ 4,000 = 18.84 gallons

The Answer: is rounded down because 19 whole gallons

would not fit. Final Answer: 18 gallons.

3. Social Studies: “We hold these

Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endo wed by their Creator

with certain unalienable Rights, that among these rights are Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of Happiness.”

Which of the following political actions violated the principle of “unalienable Rights” of liberty that evolved from the above

excerpt of the U.S. Declaration of Independence

A. In 1857, a U.S. Supreme Court ruling promoted the expansion of slavery in U. S. territories.

B. In 1870, the Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution outlawed the practice of denying the right to vote because of race, color,

or previous condition of servitude.

C. In 1920, the Nineteenth Amendment to the Constitution granted women the right to vote nationwide.

D. In 1964, the Civil Rights Act outlawed racial discrimination in employment and public accommodations.

E. In 1971, the Twenty-Sixth Amendment to the Constitution extended the right to vote to 18-year-old citizens.

40 cm

60 cm

Answer: A

ver some table salt that has been completely dissolved in water. Which of the following

processes would be the most effective method of extracting salt from the solution

4. Science: A cook decides to reco

A. spinning the solution in a mixer

B. boiling away the water

C. pouring the solution through cloth

D. dripping the solution through a paper filter

E. bubbling oxygen through the solution

Answer: B

Onthe

by Pamela Smith

hether you loved or hated your

high school days, the thought of

taking a high school exit exam can

be daunting. In Texas, more than one

out of five adults lack their high school

credentials and in 2009, more than

54,000 of these individuals sought

to prove they’ve mastered the basics

by taking the General Educational

Development Tests, better known as

the GED.

Taking GED tests is a challenge;

however, TarrantCountyCollege tries

to make the experience as pleasant as

possible while committing to provide

outstanding service.

Former Chief Examiner Clifton

Dobbins of the South Campus Testing

Center said he tells the same joke

every week to help put students at

ease. “I tell them, ’Do you know your

numbers What about your alphabet

Well, this test is all about numbers and

letters, so you’ll do fine.’

“We do what we can to be sure

that the students are comfortable,”

Dobbins said. “We try to relieve their

anxiety as much as possible.”

It’s this commitment to quality that

enabled the TCC South Campus GED

Testing Center to receive an overall

“Excellent” rating by the 2010 State

Chief Examiners In-Service based on

the testing program operations for

2008 and 2009.

More than 500 students have

taken the GED tests at the South

Campus. Many go on to become

TCC students. Dobbins noted that

applicants take the test for various

reasons, such as employer or military

requirements, but whatever the reason,

he encourages them to take the next

step and earn a college degree. “The

same stamina that you used to obtain

a GED,” Dobbins tells testers, “…will

(help) make you a successful student.”

Dobbins said that South Campus

has seen an increase in the number

of GED test takers, and he anticipates

RIGHT

that at least 1,000 people will have

tested by the end of the year.

Dobbins credits the center's

examiner, Shawn Taylor, for her

professionalism and implementation

of the required guidelines during test

sessions as the reason why South

Campus received an excellent rating.

“We follow state guidelines to the

letter,” Dobbins said. “Our reports

are submitted on time, we carefully

monitor GED testing materials from

theft, and we follow procedures

on how we administer the test.”

Director of Continuing Education

Services Tiffany Lopez Hamilton plans

to use that same commitment for

TCC’s newest testing sites monitored

by the Trinity River Campus. Testing

became available Oct. 1 to the general

public and to students at TRC, as well

as to inmates through two addendum

testing sites at Denton County Jail and

TarrantCounty Jail. The Trinity River

Campus also administers the GED test

in Spanish.

Track

Beginning February 2011,

Northwest Campus will also begin

administering the paper/pencil

exam. And in April 2011, the campus

will offer the Spanish GED test.

Northwest has also committed to

the second phase of beta testing for

online computerized testing, which

will be made available through the

campus’ Continuing Education High-

Stakes ACT Testing Center.

“Northwest Campus is a

proud partner with the District and

Weatherford College in helping bridge

a gap for area residents searching

for GED test centers,” said Director

of Continuing Education Services

Susie Olmos-Soto.

TCC’s added testing location

will minimize high volume requests

to meet the needs of both north

Tarrant and Parker counties,

something Weatherford test center

administrators are pleased about,

Soto added.

Preregistration is recommended

for all center sites. Testing is usually

held on Tuesdays, Thursdays and

some Saturdays. The cost is $80

to complete a new exam, which

includes five sections – reading,

writing, math, social studies and –

science.

More than $1,000 was donated

to a fund managed by the Tarrant

Literacy Coalition to provide financial

assistance to Tarrant and Parker

county residents wanting to take the

tests. Students must apply through

their GED instructor, who can contact

the Tarrant Literacy Coalition for an

application.

By offering the GED tests,

the College continues to provide

educational opportunities and

services to the TarrantCounty

community.

8

Winter 2011

www.tccd.edu

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 9


A Look Into

Progress

Facilities

Budgeted Capital

Improvement Expenditures

2008-2009

$142,137,102

2009-2010

$142,013,942

2010-2011

$129,840,251

Recent Projects

Trinity River Campus Renovations • Southeast

Campus New Academic Wing • South Campus

Academic Classrooms • Building Renovations •

Northwest Counseling, Testing and Science

Renovations • Wayfinding and Signage • Tarrant

CountyCollege Opportunity Center Renovations •

Exterior Lighting • Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment

Replacement • Dining Room Upgrades • Safety and

Security • Energy Conservation and Effciency •

Irrigation Management • District Wide Capital

Improvement Project Support • Roof Asset

Management • Northeast Campus Theatre

Renovations • Electrical Renovation and Repairs •

Modular Buildings • Southeast Campus

Black Box Theatre

tcc’s

Commitment to

Achieving

Student Success

• Assigned advisors for all

first-time-in-college (FTIC)

students that are Texas

Success Initiative (TSI)

obligated in one or more areas

• Required developmental

courses for students that are

TSI-obligated in Reading,

Writing or Mathematics

• Transition to College Success

Course for FTIC students that

are TSI-obligated in two or

more areas

• Mandatory course attendance

–to take effect in the Spring

2011 semester; for students

enrolled in college readiness

courses

First-time-in-college

students

Fall 2009

5,022 Full-time

3,490 Part-time

Achieving the Dream

TCC is one of more than

130 institutions in 24

states that are part of the

nationwide Achieving the

Dream network.

Transfer Rates

1,350

students transferred to a four-year college or university in2009

compared to

2000

students in

874

10

Winter 2011

www.tccd.edu

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 11


Southeast Campus Counselor and Coordinator of the Center for Academic Success Marisa Garcia-Luna,

a member of the Data Team, speaks to the Achieving the Dream group during a recent meeting.

Achieving the Dream

By Cacy Barnard

y DeeDra Parrish

Photos b

Northeast Registrar Brian Barrett looks at new methods working toward student success with faculty and staff.

From the first day of registration to

graduation, TarrantCountyCollege

students travel unique paths,

progressing in their own way–one

semester, one course, one day at a time.

Now crucial to translating this

progress, no matter the size or shape,

to success, is a key resource recently

adopted by TarrantCountyCollege.

Joining the Achieving the Dream initiative

in spring 2010, the College became one

of more than 130 community colleges

nationwide committed to:

• identifying strategies to improve

student success;

• closing achievement gaps; and

• increasing retention, persistence,

and completion rates.

With this mindset mirroring

strategies found in TCC’s Vision 2015

Strategic Plan, Achieving the Dream will

serve as a complementary initiative

pointed toward the College’s existing

fundamental focus on student access

and success.

“Everything we are doing is

interconnected,” said Vice

Chancellor for Student Success

Joy Gates Black. “The ultimate

goal is for all of the pieces to align

and come together in one unified

package. All roads will lead to

student access and success.”

The data -driven model of

Achieving the Dream will help

TCC to heavily integrate facts and

figures in planning and decision -

making processes. In the early

stages, this will include mining

and analyzing data to establish a

baseline of where the institution

stands now, identifying both areas

of high performance and areas needing

improvement. Data will not only be drawn

from internal resources, but will also

be supplemented by research from the

Survey of Entering Student Engagement

(SENSE) and the Community College

Survey of Student Engagement

(CCSSE), both of which provide pivotal

insight into student experiences at

technical and community colleges.

“First, we have to all learn to

speak the same language,” said Alma

Martinez -Egger, TCC’s interim director

for Achieving the Dream. “Developing

standard definitions of success will

help us to better serve students and

reach our end goal.”

This baseline will then be used to

generate overarching strategies and

priorities to be tackled incrementally

by TCC, with precise measures of

progress each step of the way. Further

backing the concept of Achieving the

Dream and Vision 2015 are additional

programs and funds such as the $2

million “Strengthening Institutions”

grant awarded to TCC this fall by the

U.S. Department of Education.

Specifically, the grant will foster an

increased focus on the success of all

first -time-in-college students, faculty and

staff development aimed at supporting

s tudent success, and increasing

p ersistence and graduation rates,

p articularly among African-American

and Hispanic student populations.

Though initially such an institutional

u ndertaking may seem lofty, campus

c onversations, workshops and

o ther TCC community engagement

o pportunities are helping to bring to

light numerous ways in which TCC is

a lready excelling. In many instances,

progress and best practices will likely

be found in the expansion of existing

relationships and programs.

"This grant will enable Tarrant

C ounty College to expand success

initiatives begun this fall and explore

o ther strategies for enhancing the

success of all students," said Gates

Black. “As TCC enrollment grows

rapidly, the measurable success,

rather than the number, of the

students becomes increasingly critical

to the future of our community.”

For each identified priority,

student cohorts will be tracked

over time and reflected in thorough

data that demonstrates tangible

results. And though success may

be achieved in one set of identified

priorities, systematic improvement will

continue through a cycle constantly

centered on student success.

12

Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 13


Student Earline Kennedy works on an

in-class assignment.

Student David Schupe listens during a Mod Math class.

Bryan Stewart, Trinity River Campus vice president for

teaching and learning, teaches a Mod Math course.

Student Malissia Rogers solves a problem during a Mod Math session, a

program that is now offered at multiple TarrantCountyCollege campuses.

Mod

Math

Plants Seeds for Student

Growth

By David House

Photos by Glen E. Ellman

As a U.S. Marine, Michael Gardner

was trained well for battle with human

enemies.

But, as a student earlier in his life,

he felt helpless against an old foe –

mathematics. So helpless, in fact, that

he avoided college upon graduation from

Pontiac Northern High School in Pontiac,

Mich., opting for military service.

“Uncertain, fearful,” he said, when

asked how he once viewed his reaction

to the intimidating specter of college -

level math. “It stopped me from going

to college.”

That was in 1994. Now,

Gardner’s confidently tackling college

algebra at TarrantCountyCollege’s

Trinity River Campus and aiming

to become the first in his family

to earn a baccalaureate degree.

A life- changing program

fueled Gardner’s victory – Modular

Mathematics, a.k.a. “Mod Math,” an

innovative developmental initiative to

help students who need sufficient skills

to pass a 3 -hour math course required

for an associate degree.

TCC put Mod Math on the drawing

board in 2006, introduced it on an

experimental basis in 2008, and then

launched it as a pilot program in 2009.

The effort mirrors deep commitment to

student success as outlined in goals

and objectives in the district’s Vision

2015 Strategic Plan.

Partially funded this year with a

grant from the Texas Higher Education

Coordinating Board (THECB), Mod

Math addresses math phobia and

underdeveloped math skills that block

the path to higher education for many

people, said Greta Harris–Hardland,

Northeast Campus math instructor

and Districtwide Mod Math project

coordinator/evaluator.

Of interest statewide and nationally,

TCC’s Mod Math program is an urgently

needed solution to entrenched

obstacles, she said. “Success rates

in math have been under 50 percent

across the nation” for a long time.

Mod Math, offered at Northeast,

Trinity River and South campuses and

in a small group at Northwest Campus,

breaks three 3 -hour math courses into

nine 1 -hour, five -week courses, she

said. With an array of resources ranging

from tutors to high -tech equipment

and specially trained faculty, students

can grow math skills from basics in

arithmetic to algebra levels at which

they are ready for college algebra.

Bryan Stewart, TR vice president

for Teaching and Learning Services,

teaches a Mod Math class and has

seen the program’s value first hand.

“It’s the most effective way to deliver

developmental mathematics,” he said.

“The completion percentage was more

than 80 percent in the first five weeks

of the fall semester. I am very excited

about the results, and our students and

faculty have been very positive.”

A sampling of raw Districtwide

numbers reflects Mod Math’s success.

For instance, Harris - Hardland said,

“With the opening of the new Trinity

River Campus, TCCD was able to

increase the number of sections

offered to 94 in the Fall 2009

semester and 110 for Spring 2010.

“In the Fall 2008 semester, 439

students took Mod Math in a total of

35 sections across the District; 1,227

students were enrolled last spring. We

are collecting data for Fall 2010 now.

Even though the numbers are increasing,

the rate of successful completion has

continued to stay at around 20 percent

higher than traditional 3 -hour classes.”

Additionally, she said, “Students

withdraw on an average of 5 to 9

percent in Mod Math as opposed to 30

to 36 percent in the traditional 3-hour

developmental courses. Students

are completing mod 6 – the testing

level that meets the Texas Success

Initiative’s obligation – at a rate of 58

to 92 percent while the completion rate

for Math 0304 (the TSI obligation point)

is 40 to 45 percent.”

Mod Math makes a difference for

students in many ways, Harris–Hardland

said.

“I think students are successful

with the same curriculum as the

traditional 3 -hour courses because they

get a grade and an hour credit each 5.3

weeks. This allows life issues which

cause students to withdraw or fail an

entire semester to only impact a short

1-hour course.”

South Campus Math Instructor

Catherine Haley agrees. “I have

had several students who have

experienced major life events that

would have prevented them from

passing a semester -long course,” she

said. “These same students, through

the Mod Math program, are able to just

repeat a five -week course during the

same semester and still move forward.”

Additionally, Harris - Hardland said,

“Students may retest using the

MYMATHTEST placement exam every

five weeks and skip sections not

needed.

“They may also do more than

one mod in a five -week session if

they chose a computer -assisted

format (that) meets in a lab with

more time to move forward with

instructor help. Since the textbook/

MYMATHLAB computer material is

packaged at one cost for all 9 hours,

students may save money and time.”

The greatest measure of Mod Math’s

impact actually may be immeasurable:

the degree of hope many students

speak of as they master math skills.

“I’m excited to learn math now,”

Gardner said.

So is South Campus Mod Math

student Lonie Romero. “It has been

such a comfort to be able to go at my

own pace.”

And Romero has a message for

anyone suffering from math anxiety:

“Just get in there and go for it. Never

fear. Mod Math is here.”

14

Winter 2011

www.tccd.edu

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 15


A Look Into

Success

Scholarship Funds Awarded by TCC Foundation

Scholarships

600,000

500,000

400,000

Number of Scholarships Awarded by TCC Foundation

600

500

400

Pass rates on state and licensure exams:

Dental hygiene, law enforcement,

physical therapist assistant,

radiologic technology and fire

protection, long term care

and aviation

programs achieved

100%

pass rates.

300,000

300

200,000

200

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

100,000

04-05 05-06 06-07 07-08 08-09 09-10 10-11

100

Distance Learning Course Enrollments

Scholarship $

Academic

Year

04-05

05-06

06-07

07-08

08-09

09-10

10-11

Scholarship

$

58,384.00

83,283.00

85,369.00

104,826.00

161,511.00

287,286.00

510,920.00

# of Scholarships Academic # of

Year Scholarships

04-05 46

05-06 65

* Numbers for

Spring 2011 06-07 73

are estimated.

07-08 83

08-09 136

09-10 220

10-11 574

Federal/State Financial Aid Awarded

Number of Recipients 20,970

14,353 09-10

12,717

10,804

$79,936,139

08-09

07-08

06-07 $47,015,731

$35,768,653

$25,978,350 Total Money Awarded

2009-2010

2008-2009

2007-2008

2006-2007

2005-2006

54,617

43,307

34,278

28,018

23,815

TCC Degrees and Certificates Awarded

2,982

2005-06 3,112

3,021

2006-07

2007-08

3,257

2008-09

4,217

2009-10

16 Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 17


Number of Number of

2009 students who

graduates of received

BISD at TCC financial

assistance

though TCC

rish

DeeDra Par

Success in

PartnershipS

By Cacy Barnard

Number of Number of Number of

2010 students who students who

graduates of received financial qualified for BISD

BISD at TCC assistance scholarships

though TCC

(includes grants and Stars

of Tomorrow)

TarrantCountyCollege student Christian

Younger has a plan.

Complete an associate degree at

TCC’s Northeast Campus. Enter The

University of Texas at Arlington’s pre -

veterinary program. And finally, join

the military enabling her to enroll in a

Doctor of Veterinary Medicine program.

At 18 years old, Younger is right

on track to her dream career, thanks

to a new partnership between TCC and

Birdville Independent School District that

provides free tuition for every graduate

of Birdville’s three high schools.

“Without the financial assistance,

I definitely wouldn’t have been able to

attend college now,” said Younger, who

also works more than 40 hours each

week at a local convenience store. “I

probably would have gotten here at

some point, but it would have taken me

much longer.”

This fall, nearly 150 other students

who graduated from Richland, Haltom

and Birdville high schools and enrolled

at TCC campuses became the first

group eligible to attend a year of

college tuition -free. An additional

320 graduates are receiving further

support from grants and TCC’s Stars of

Tomorrow Program.

The Birdville partnership was first

made possible by a unanimous vote

from the Birdville ISD Board of Trustees

to dedicate $7 million of the district’s oil

and gas lease proceeds to establish an

endowment fund for scholarships. The

agreement was finalized in March 2010.

“By establishing this endowment,

trustees are impacting the future of our

students by offering them an opportunity

to further their education,” said BISD

Superintendent Stephen Waddell. “In

addition, this program goes beyond

ensuring that students are college -

ready as required in the 2009 legislative

session’s House Bill 3. It provides

the means to make college a reality.”

The TCC Foundation, responsible

for the majority of TCC scholarships,

coordinates the program on behalf

of BISD and TCC, identifying eligible

students and ensuring that funds

are awarded to those who meet set

requirements.

Students must have attended a

BISD high school during their junior and

senior years and must enroll in any one

of the five TCC campuses during the

first semester immediately following

high school graduation.

Though the minimum enrollment

requirement per semester is 6 credit

hours, funds cover up to 15 hours per

semester for the first two semesters for

students like Younger who want to carry

a full -time class load.

Along with taking 13 credit hours

during the fall semester, Younger

maintains a demanding work schedule,

which often means squeezing in one to

two hours of study time before an eight -

or 10 -hour shift. And when not in class,

studying or at work, she pursues her

natural artistic talents.

With a bit of encouragement from a

high school art teacher a couple years

ago, Younger began to focus on her

passion for painting. Now, she sells a

couple of paintings per month through

her Facebook page “The Face of Venus,”

earning extra cash to save for college

and future needs.

This type of determination is one

Younger wants to share with other

students who may think college and

other career goals are a far reach.

“I’ve wanted to be a vet since I can

remember,” she said. “Where there’s a

will there’s a way.”

For Younger, TCC is a clear part of

that way.

“Community colleges can help to

get you started and can lead to many

other opportunities to move ahead in

life,” said Younger. “If you take it one

step at a time, college can become a

reality. Everything is possible.”

Student Christian Younger, a Birdville High School graduate, now takes classes at

Northeast Campus thanks to a new scholarship partnership.

18

Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 19


Student Phillip Simmons reads the

latest issue of The Collegian.

Photos by DeeDra Parrish

The Collegian staff including Editor Shelly Williams, left, and Photo Editor

Casey Holder, right, recently garnered top honors at a national college

newspaper competition.

Top Honors

The Collegian, TarrantCountyCollege’s studentrun

newspaper, was recognized recently as one

of the top seven two-year college newspapers in

the United States.

Honors were announced at the 89th Annual

Associated College Press/College Media

Advisers (ACP/CMA) convention in Louisville, Ky.,

that drew more than 2,000 participants.

The Collegian won finalist honors in ACP

Newspaper Pacemaker competition that featured

entries from colleges and universities across

the U.S. and Canada. Professional journalists

in the Washington, D.C., area judged Pacemaker

entries. The Newspaper Association of America

Foundation co-sponsored the award.

The paper also won third place nationally

in Best of Show for two-year college weekly

broadsheet newspapers.

Additionally, news photography by Casey Holder,

Collegian photo editor, was selected for Top 10

group favorites recognition among 120 entries.

From scores of applicants at the convention,

The Associated Press selected five college

journalists, including Collegian Editor-in-Chief

Shelly Williams, for internship interviews.

Instills Lifelong Skills

by David House

Lindsey Bever’s an ambitious young

reporter for The Dallas Morning News,

one of the United States’ largest and

most accomplished daily newspapers.

She’s passionate about her work,

its public service, and the purpose it

creates in her life.

“Journalism’s a calling,” she

said. That’s a lesson she learned

well as a student in TarrantCounty

College’s award -winning journalism

program. That’s what she heard later

at Texas Christian University where she

graduated magna cum laude in spring

2008 with a bachelor’s degree in News -

Editorial Journalism.

“All of my journalism professors

told me that journalism is a calling.

I wanted to be part of it, and TCC

helped me get there. I received a solid

foundation. There was no gap between

the classroom and the workforce.”

Bever’s achievements reflect the

comprehensive quality of student

success sought in TCC’s Vision 2015

Strategic Plan goals. They’re a measure

of excellence in TCC’s nationally

respected journalism program and

its crown jewel – The Collegian, TCC’s

student -run, highly decorated weekly

newspaper.

Every week, 10,000 copies of The

Collegian are distributed “in racks in

every building of every campus,” said

Collegian adviser Eddye Gallagher,

assistant professor of journalism in

Northeast Campus’ Communication

Arts Program. “We also mail to TCC’s

board members, area high schools,

area public libraries, and other Texas

college and university papers.”

A staff that can range in size from

six to 15 produces content that mirrors

The Collegian’s real -world mission

statement, Gallagher said: “to serve

the students of TarrantCountyCollege

District by publishing news, photos,

features and commentary of interest and

importance to the College community

while guided by the principles of sound,

reasonable and ethical journalism.”

“It’s the one place that

connects the student body as a

whole for all five campuses,” said

Editor -in -Chief Shelly Williams.

That’s accomplished with hightech

tools as well as ink on newsprint

and connections with cyberspace, said

Journalism Instructor Chris Whitley,

Gallagher’s Collegian co -adviser.

“We’re trying to increase our ability

to share multimedia skills,” he said.

“Our main mission is to get people to

communicate effectively, and that’s

not always going to mean doing it in a

400 -word printed story.

“We’re producing videos for

our website. My Reporting II class

puts together a blog where they

are charged with finding stories

of TCC people and taking pictures

of them with their cell phone.”

Collegian staffers shoulder many

responsibilities, meaning they also

operate the paper’s Facebook and

Twitter social media accounts.

It’s all part of a hands-on, hardworking,

heavily coached and edited

approach with transferrable courses that

teach every aspect of journalism, from

ethics to newsgathering techniques and

page design. The aim, Gallagher said, is

“giving career skills to staffers.”

It pays off, former Collegian staffers

say.

“Through (faculty) mentorship and

the classes, I was able to start my career

much earlier than I anticipated,” said

Susan McFarland, who was a hairstylist

when she enrolled at TCC in fall 2005.

McFarland, now a professional freelance

journalist, won Reporter of the Year in

the statewide Texas Community College

Journalism Association competition.

The award included an internship at the

Corpus Christi Caller-Times.

“Everything my advisors have taught

me can be applied in the professional

world,” said Williams, who this year won

the same statewide honor captured by

McFarland as well as the Caller-Times

internship.

Collegian Photo Editor Casey

Holder credits faculty mentors and

their high expectations with driving the

development of his talents and ambition.

“I have no idea where I would be if I

hadn’t have found my (Collegian) job.”

Steve Knight, who earned a

master’s degree in music education

from Texas Tech University and

had worked as a high school band

director for 10 years, turned to TCC’s

journalism program in 2008 when he

decided on a new career path. He’s

now a general assignments reporter

for the Cleburne (Texas) Times-Review.

“TCC not only gave me the tools

to be a professional journalist, it

also restored my self-esteem and

confidence as a person,” said Knight,

who was honored with awards from the

Texas Intercollegiate Press Association

and a scholarship from the Society of

Professional Journalists. This year, he

won three finalist awards in national

SPJ competition.

Katie Martinez, who will graduate

from TCU next spring with a bachelor’s

degree in journalism, is editor-in-chief

of the university’s student-run Image

magazine, voted recently by SPJ as the

best such magazine in the U.S.

“Eddye Gallagher changed my life,”

Martinez said. “I didn’t know what I

wanted to do when I enrolled at TCC in

2006. I took Journalism 101,” where

Gallagher spotted Martinez’s intellectual

strengths, writing talent and drive.

With Gallagher’s mentoring,

Martinez joined The Collegian staff

where her work won many statewide

awards and led to scholarships that

opened doors at TCU for her.

As with Bever, she found her calling,

Martinez said.

“Our students do true service

learning every week by publishing the

paper,” Gallagher said. “They learn,

they serve our College community, and

they prepare for careers in the field or

in other areas that require writing. They

can leave here with great skills.”

20

Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 21


Th e

Compass:

in

RIGHTDIRECTION

the

By Pamela Smith

LEADINGSTUDENTS

Brandon Tucker

Catherine Hart was in her thirties when

she decided that education had to take

precedence in her life. With a young

daughter to care for and the dream of

becoming an editor, Hart put action to

her thoughts and enrolled at Tarrant

CountyCollege Southeast Campus.

Fast forward to today, and you’ll see

that Hart stayed committed to her

dream. She graduated from TCC

in spring 2010 with an associate

degree in English and is working

on her first semester as a junior at

Texas Wesleyan University.

While at TCC, Hart served as

editor of The Compass, Southeast

Campus’ literary magazine. The

magazine features original art and

literature from Southeast Campus

students and staff and includes a

short story and poem from Hart.

The campus hadn’t printed a

literary magazine since The Oracle in

1999, so the rebirth on Oct. 12, 2010,

was an exciting milestone. The celebration

was even greater when, in its first year

competing, The Compass garnered

second place in the Southwestern Division

of the prestigious Community College

Humanities Association Literary Magazine

Competition. The award was presented

at the CCHA Southwestern Division

conference in Houston October 28-30.

“Working on the publication really

reinforced that I was taking the right

career path,” Hart said. “It gave me just

a taste of publishing and it was exciting.”

Hart submitted four entries for the

publication, but only two, a short story

and poem, were selected. All identifying

information was removed from the

entries and then voted on by the Arts

Magazine Cooperative, the student

organization responsible for producing

the publication.

Though it was student managed,

the project was possible because of the

persistence and dedication of faculty

sponsors Pennie Boyett, TCC English

instructor, and KC Jenkins, TCC adjunct

art instructor; as well as the work of TCC

graphics specialist Sally Jinks, who was

responsible for the magazine layout.

In fall 2009, Boyett was selected

to revive the literary magazine. After

researching the magazines at South,

Northwest and Northeast campuses,

Boyett noticed that “the more students

were involved, the better the magazine

worked out.

“I felt like it would be a good idea to

have students work on the project,”

Boyett said, “so I worked with Student

Activities to start a student organization

to work with this magazine. We had

about 15 students involved at various

levels.”

Of the 200 submissions, 72 were

selected by the student group for

publication including short stories, flash

fiction (short stories with 10 words

or less), poetry, essays, paintings,

drawings, photography, sculptures,

art metals (jewelry) and mixed media.

Submissions were made by students

from a variety of majors. “Only students

worked on the selections,” Boyett

confirmed. “KC and I were available;

we answered questions; we were there

when they were looking at the art, but we

did not try to influence how they voted.”

Boyett is proud of the hard work

the students put into the project and

said she feels that the accolades they

receive will be worth the effort.

“For students to get the kind of

recognition they do, where their work

is actually published, is enormously

encouraging,” Boyett said. “It was

wonderful when we were giving the

magazines to the students involved in

it, just to watch their eyes. Our print

shop did a phenomenal job with it, so it

looks really nice. It is such a wonderful

form of recognition for the quality of

work that the students do. I think it

reflects really well on the campus and

on the students that are here.

“That’s the kind of encouragement

that I think will carry a lot of these

people a long way. Maybe they know or

hope that they can do something good.

Just to be able to show or to have it in

a substantial form is incredible. There

is something really nice about a printed

project even in this digital era.”

In addition to copies for sale to the

public, a class set is available for faculty

to use in the classroom for instructional

purposes. “This is valuable for teachers

to be able to say, ‘This is student work,

and you can do this too. ' "Boyett said.

About the Magazine

•72 full-color pages

•Includes original art and literature

from Southeast Campus

•82 percent of all entries are by

students, 18 percent are by

faculty and staff

•Available for $10 at the English

Department or Liberal Arts

offices

•Submissions for the 2011

issue of The Compass are being

accepted for consideration

through Feb. 11.

22

Winter 2011

www.tccd.edu

www.tccd.edu Winter 2011 23


Board of Trustees

TarrantCountyCollege at a Glance

TCC is the sixth–largest college or university in Texas.

Joe Hudson

President

Kristin Vandergriff

Vice President

Erma C. Johnson Hadley, M.Ed.

Chancellor

Campuses

Bill Greenhill

Secretary

O.K. Carter

Assistant Secretary

Erma C. Johnson Hadley, M.Ed., Chancellor

Chancellor's Executive Leadership Team

Joy Gates Black, Ed.D.

Judith J. Carrier, Ed.D.

Larry Darlage, Ph.D.

Tahita Fulkerson, Ph.D.

Reginald Gates, M.Ed.

William W. Lace, Ed.D.

Elva C. LeBlanc, Ph.D.

Mark McClendon, M.S., M.B.A.

Nina Petty, B.B.A.

Maria Shelton, M.B.A.

Ernest L. Thomas, Ph.D.

David A. Wells, Ph.D.

Louise Appleman

Gwendolyn Morrison,

Ph.D.

Vice Chancellor for Student Success

President, Southeast Campus

President, Northeast Campus

President, Trinity River Campus

Vice Chancellor for Communications and External Affairs

Vice Chancellor for Administration

President, Northwest Campus

Vice Chancellor for Finance

Vice Chancellor for Real Estate and Facilities

Vice Chancellor for Information and Technical Services

President, South Campus

Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs

Robyn Medina Winnett

Northeast Campus Northwest Campus South Campus Southeast Campus Trinity River Campus

828 W. Harwood Road 4801 Marine Creek Parkway 5301 Campus Drive 2100 Southeast Parkway 300 Trinity Campus Circle

Hurst, Texas 76054 Fort Worth, Texas 76179 Fort Worth, Texas 76119 Arlington, Texas 76018 Fort Worth, Texas 76102

24 Winter 2011 www.tccd.edu

Administrative Offices

May Owen Center

1500 Houston Street

Fort Worth, Texas 76102−6524

817–515−TCCD (8223)

Continuing Education, Corporate and Workforce Services

TCC Opportunity Center

5901 Fitzhugh Avenue / Fort Worth, Texas 76119

TCC Corporate Training Center AllianceTexas

13600 Heritage Parkway, Suite 100 / Fort Worth, Texas 76177

Credit students 70,622

Noncredit Continuing Education students 28,175

Total students (unduplicated) 96,189

Approximately one in every 19 TarrantCounty

residents takes a class at TCC each year.

Credit Students Fall 2010

Northeast Campus 17,458 (35.6%)

Northwest Campus 13,431 (27.3%)

South Campus 12,524 (25.5%)

Southeast Campus 14,692 (29.9%)

Trinity River Campus 5,460 (11.1%)

(Campus totals added together equal more than the District

figure due to duplicate enrollments.)

35,163

2006 2005 34,854

2008

2007 37,948

2009

2010

49,108

Fall Semester Credit Students

TarrantCountyCollege District Enrollment

Credit Student Characteristics

Men 20,398 (41.5%)

Women 28,710 (58.5%)

African-American 8,454 (17.2%)

Anglo 25,626 (52.2%)

Asian 2,970 (6.0%)

Hispanic 10,854 (22.1%)

Native American 247 (0.5%)

Other Ethnic Groups 957 (1.9%)

Average Age 26

Tuition 2010-2011

$50 per semester hour, including all mandatory fees

TarrantCountyCollege Employees

Full-time

Full-time

Faculty

Employees 657

Credit Adjunct

2,013 Faculty

1,173

111

Doctorate 502

29

Bachelor’s

15

Associate

Master’s

Educational Attainment of Faculty

* Full-time faculty only

Funding Source

Amount

State Appropriation 49,931,539

Maintenance Tax 103,165,137

Tuition and Fees 54,902,000

Indirect Cost & Other 2,600,000

Designated Reserve 13,955,000

Total Educational

224,553,676

& General Income

Financial Information

Income

Source

State Aid

Maintenance Tax – Operation and Maintenance

Tuition and Fees

Interest and Other

Designated Reserve

Total Educational and General Income

Debt Service Taxes

Maintenance Tax – Renewal and Replacement

Interest Income

Renewal and Replacement Fund Balance

Total Renewal and Replacement Income

Maintenance Tax – Building Fund

Interest Income

Building Fund Balance

Total Building Fund Income

Auxiliary Enterprise

Total Operating Budget Income

Expenses

Purpose

Instruction

Student Services

Staff Benefits

General Administration

General Institutional Expenses

Learning Resources

Physical Plant Operation

Contingency: Insurance, Enrollment/Other

Total Operation and Maintenance

Debt Service

*Renewal and Replacements

*Building Fund

Auxiliary Enterprise

Total Operating Budget Expenses

TarrantCountyCollege

Budget Revenue 2010-2011

1% 6%

25% 22%

46%

Maintenance Tax

Designated Reserve

Indirect Cost & Other

Tuition and Fees

State Appropriation

2010-2011 Operating Budget

Amount

49,931,539

103,165,137

54,902,000

2,600,000

13,955,000

224,553,676

7,022,725

46,779,163

125,000

18,026,851

64,931,014

28,924,046

80,000

35,905,191

64,909,237

4,080,000

365,496,652

Amount

107,739,937

15,037,628

18,820,000

19,788,866

15,733,262

7,982,539

Источник: https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/view/32964254/contents-tarrant-county-college

contents - Tarrant County College

FROM THE DESK OF

CONTENTS

Erma Johnson Hadley

Chancellor

e have heard time and again that actions speak louder than words. At TarrantCounty

College, the actions toward student access and success certainly are loud.

We are proud of our accomplishments during the past year, and excited about the

path ahead as we embark on an era guided by the TCC Vision 2015 Strategic Plan. Tarrant

CountyCollege is moving rapidly to transform the ways in which we prepare our students

to become leaders of tomorrow.

First, we are focused on access for students of all types. This year we’ve explored

innovative methods to reach all audiences, including the nearly 100,000 students served

through our credit and continuing education programs.

Second, we are focused on progress. In the few months since joining the nationwide

Achieving the Dream initiative, we have received data that indicates much of our work is

excellent. Some of it is not quite there yet. I continue to charge all of us at TarrantCounty

College to not necessarily work harder–we all do that now–but to work smarter.

Pivotal to progress for students and employees is a closer look at our institutional

effectiveness. Programs are underway to better support our faculty and staff, and we

continually evaluate how we can operate more effciently while advancing our mission.

As we continue to work toward excellence, there will be stories to share and the vast

majority of the credit will be directed toward the strong dedicated efforts of our faculty and

staff. With this dedication and the backing from state and local community leaders, we can

achieve excellence. And achieve excellence, we will.

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History of the University of Texas at Arlington (1965–present)

Aerial view of the University of Texas at Arlington campus, circa 1967–1969

The history of the University of Texas at Arlington since 1965 comprises its history since joining the University of Texas System (UT System). In April 1965, the Texas Legislature transferred Arlington State College (ASC) from the Texas A&M University System to the UT System. In 1966, Maxwell Scarlett became the first African American graduate in ASC's history. In March 1967, ASC was renamed the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). Jack Woolf, who had served as president of ASC and then UTA since 1959, resigned the presidency in 1968 and was succeeded by Frank Harrison, who would serve as president until 1972. Also in 1968, UTA awarded its first master's degrees, all in engineering. In 1969, UTA hired Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at the university.

In 1972, Harrison resigned and Wendell Nedderman was named his successor, ultimately serving as president for 20 years. During his tenure, the university constructed 24 buildings, created 64 new degree programs, and grew from 14,028 students to 25,135. From the start of the Nedderman administration to the end, UTA's student demographics changed substantially: the ratio of male-to-female students shifted from approximately 2:1 to nearly 1:1 while African Americans went from 2.6% to 7.2% of the student body, Hispanic students went from 1.9% to 6.3%, and Asian and Pacific Islander students went from less than 1% to 8.5%. By the mid-1970s, UTA had become one of the most accessible universities in Texas for disabled students.

In April 1992, Nedderman was succeeded as university president by Ryan C. Amacher. Focused on actively recruiting minority students and employees to UTA as well as marketing the university aggressively, Amacher and his administration polarized the campus before his sudden resignation in March 1995 in the face of charges that he showed budgetary favoritism to athletics and spent too much on non-essential costs at the expense of academic programs. He was replaced by University of Texas at Austin dean Robert Witt as UTA's enrollment continued to decline for seven consecutive years in the 1990s. UTA returned to growing enrollment by 1999, reaching an all-time high of 25,297 students in fall 2004. In November 2003, Michigan State University dean James D. Spaniolo was named UTA president. In 2013, he was succeeded by Vistasp Karbhari, who served as president until resigning in 2020 in the face of a lawsuit by a former vice president and the release of an audit report.

The UTA campus has grown substantially since 1965, with the addition of numerous new buildings, including College Park Center, the Engineering Research Building, and the Science and Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) Building. Student traditions have also developed considerably over the same timespan, with examples being bed racing, oozeball, and International Week. Among the most notable athletics events of the UTA era were the termination of the university's football program in 1985, the women's volleyball team advancing to the Final Four in the 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament, and the Movin' Mavs and Lady Movin' Mavswheelchair basketball teams winning nine and two national championships, respectively.

Last years as Arlington State College (1965–67)[edit]

In April 1965, the Texas Legislature transferred Arlington State College (ASC) from the Texas A&M University System to the University of Texas System (UT System).[1][2] At the time, the college's total student enrollment was 11,873.[3] The transition also marked ASC's new requirement that incoming students had an "aptitude for doing college work", according to historian and writer Gerald Saxon, which was based on both SAT scores and high school class ranking.[4] After ASC joined the UT System in 1965, it established its College of Business, College of Liberal Arts, and College of Science as stand-alone colleges.[5]Jack Woolf, who had served as president of ASC since 1959, continued to do so after the move to the UT System.[1] Shortly after ASC joined the system, UT System chancellor Harry Ransom asked Frank Harrison, then the associate dean for graduate studies at the UT System's Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, to spend part of his time at ASC to help it establish graduate programs.[6]

In the mid-1960s, male students typically made up 75–80% of the student body.[4] The school had a relatively large number of nontraditional students: 34% of students were married, 60% were 21 or older, 44% worked at least 20 hours per week, and 61% worked at least part-time.[4][7] The two Texas counties providing the most students were Tarrant County and then Dallas County, while California supplied the most out-of-state students and Iran the most international students.[4] In 1966, Maxwell Scarlett became the first African American graduate in ASC's history when he graduated with a bachelor's degree in biology after transferring from North Texas State University.[8][9][10] By 1967, ASC had become firmly established as a commuter school with only a small minority of students living on campus in dormitories.[7]

In 1965–66, ASC had a budget of $9.4 million, but less than $200,000 of this was spent on research.[11] By 1966, the college offered new bachelor's degree programs in accounting, government, and sociology, while also debuting a variety of secondary teaching certificate programs.[12] In summer 1966, ASC gained approval from the College and University Co-ordinating Board to offer master's degree programs beginning that fall,[13] with four different programs offering master's degrees.[1][6][13] In the mid to late 1960s, courses in engineering and the sciences were particularly popular among students.[7]

After UTA became part of the UT System, its previously independent student clubs were allowed to affiliate with national fraternities and sororities beginning in 1966.[14][15][16] The Texas A&M University System had previously not allowed ASC to have national Greek organizations active on campus.[17] In 1967, the first chapters of national fraternities and sororities were established at ASC.[18] During the 1966–67 academic year, student representatives were included on university-wide committees for the first time ever.[19]

Early years as the University of Texas at Arlington (1967–72)[edit]

In March 1967, ASC was renamed the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA).[1][15] President Woolf commented, "I think we have reached a name which does not shackle the future development of the institution."[20] On March 6, 1967, Texas governor John Connally signed into law a bill that renamed each UT System university "the University of Texas at [location]". Unlike the previous plan of the Texas A&M University System to rename ASC "Texas A&M University at Arlington", UTA's new name was received positively by many students, faculty, and administrators. It was widely perceived as increasing the prestige, name recognition, and funding and recruiting abilities of the university. The first diplomas featuring the new name were awarded on May 31, 1967.[15]

In September 1967, UTA's enrollment grew to 11,873, an all-time high, despite the opening of the first Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) campus that fall.[21][22] Also in 1967, the Institute of Urban Studies was established at UTA by an act of the Texas Legislature. The institute provides planning for economic development, site selection, and transportation as well as feasibility studies.[23]

In 1968, Jack Woolf resigned his position as president, while continuing to serve as a mechanical engineering professor before ultimately retiring in 1989.[21][24][25] In the estimation of Gerald Saxon, Woolf had lost the confidence of the faculty, due largely to his support for remaining in the A&M system and his hierarchical view of leadership, which was better suited to the A&M system than the UT System.[21] During his decade-long tenure as president, Woolf guided the university from junior-college to senior-college status, from the A&M system to the UT System, from an enrollment of less than 5,000 to approximately 12,000, and from a budget of $2.2 million to $11.8 million.[26] In 1966–67, the average salary for full professors was $12,400 to $13,500. By 1968, when President Woolf resigned, faculty salaries at UTA were the fourth highest in Texas. They had been the lowest at any state university or college when he was first named president in 1959.[27] In 1995, UTA renamed the first building constructed during his presidency as Woolf Hall.[24]

Replacing President Woolf was Frank Harrison, who would serve as president until 1972.[1][28] Harrison was appointed acting president shortly after Woolf resigned in September 1968, and then was selected permanent president after a nation-wide search that concluded in June 1969. A native of Dallas, he was educated at Southern Methodist University and Northwestern University before serving as an anatomy professor at both the University of Tennessee and Southwestern Medical School.[26] Harrison had begun working to organize UTA's graduate program in 1965, and by the time he was named acting president two years later, he had extensive knowledge of the university, the system, and the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. Although he only served as president for four years, Harrison left a legacy of new programs at UTA: 10 at the bachelor's level, 24 at the master's level, and two at the doctoral level.[29] Another of Harrison's legacies was his transformation of UTA's administrative culture, making it more democratic and open than during the A&M system era. He accomplished this by improving communications with stakeholders throughout the university, giving faculty a greater voice in decision making with seats on committees, and publishing the university budget for the first time ever.[30] Total enrollment during Harrison's tenure as president grew from 12,556 in fall 1968 to 14,028 in fall 1972. Much of this growth was due to an expansion in graduate student enrollment, which grew quickly from 301 to 1,008 over the same four-year span.[31]

Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at UTA, circa 1970

In 1968, UTA's Energy Research Center was established for the study of electrical generation and transmission, and it was soon followed by over ten other research centers in other areas of study.[1] Also in 1968, UTA awarded its first master's degrees (all in engineering),[32] began its business graduate programs,[33] and its School of Social Work began offering the region's first master's degree in social work.[34] The School of Social Work added a bachelor's degree program in 1979 and a doctoral program in 1983, and since its inception in 1968 has been housed in the former Ousley Junior High School building on the north edge of campus, which was built in 1922 as the original Arlington High School.[34] In 1969, UTA created a bachelor of fine arts program,[35] as well as a doctoral program in engineering.[29] Also in 1969, UTA hired Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at the university, as the associate dean of student life.[4][36]

In 1969, the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in Richardson joined the UT System. It had been founded as a private institution in 1961 by Texas Instruments.[30] UTA remained officially neutral on the addition of UTD to the system, but state representative Don Gladden, Arlington mayor Tom Vandergriff, and Tarrant County representative W. C. Sherman were all opposed to it.[37] Governor Preston Smith achieved a compromise that placated both UTA and UTD supporters by initially restricting UTD to junior-level, senior-level, and graduate-level courses until it began awarding bachelor's degrees in 1975, granting UTA six more years as the only comprehensive public university in the Metroplex.[31]

Linda Garza, the first female electrical engineering graduate at UTA, in 1970

In 1970, Linda Garza became the first woman to graduate with a degree in electrical engineering from UTA.[38] Between 1970 and 1973, UTA phased out its two-year associate degree programs in engineering and transitioned them to TCJC.[39] In August 1971, UTA awarded its first doctoral degrees.[29] Also in 1971, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare mandated that the university implement an employment affirmative action program by February 1972 after determining that less than 1% of university employees were minorities in 1970.[40]

Continued growth (1972–92)[edit]

In 1972, President Harrison resigned to become president of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and Wendell Nedderman was named his successor at UTA.[28][41][42] Saxon described Nedderman as "a popular choice" and a person who was "genuinely liked and admired by staff and faculty".[28] Nedderman was a native of Iowa who was educated at Iowa State University and Texas A&M University before serving on the USS Patterson during World War II. In 1947, he began working at A&M before taking the position of engineering dean at UTA in 1959. In Arlington, he later served as graduate school administrator, vice president for research and graduate affairs, and vice president for academic affairs before being named acting president in 1972.[43] Nedderman would serve as president until July 1992, over which time the university constructed 24 buildings, created 64 new degree programs, and grew from 14,028 students to 25,135.[1][41][44]

Graduate student enrollment increased from 936 to over 4,200 under Nedderman. Saxon argues that the main causes of this growth were the baby boomers coming of age, the growing size and economic strength of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, the relatively low cost of attending UTA, the expansion of its programs, and the growth of junior colleges in the area that prepared students for advanced study at UTA.[44] Additionally, Nedderman's tenure saw an increase in the amount of research and publishing conducted by UTA, which came hand-in-hand with developing graduate programs. In 1972, when Nedderman began as UTA president, the university had just $200,000 in outside funding for research, but this grew to $12.7 million by 1992, when Nedderman retired.[45]

The 1970s witnessed an expansion of both UTA's curriculum and the services it offered, including joint doctoral programs with the University of Texas Health Center in Dallas and UTD in biomedical engineering, the humanities, and mathematical sciences. Also during the 1970s, UTA's English Department created Pre/Text, An Inter-disciplinary Journal of Rhetoric as a quarterly journal with a focus on rhetorical theory. At the same time, UTA's Foreign Language and Linguistics Department published the German-instruction journal Schatzkammer, and from 1977 published the Robertson Colony papers.[1] In 1974, the Special Collections department in the UTA Library opened with a donation of over 10,000 books, documents, and maps from Jenkins and Virginia Garrett. The strengths of its holdings are the history of Texas, the broader Southwest, and Mexico.[46]

Rodney Lewis and Wanda Jo Holiday, UTA homecoming king and queen, 1980

In 1972, UTA created a Minority Student Advocacy Caucus and established a Minorities Cultural Center at its library. Between 1970 and 1979, UTA's African American enrollment grew from 176 to 1,065 and its Hispanic enrollment grew from 157 to 594. The 1970s and early 1980s also witnessed a number of African American "firsts" at UTA: Dickie Fears become the first African American cheerleader in 1971 and Royce West become the first African American president of UTA's Student Congress in 1974.[28] In 1980, Wanda Holiday became UTA's first African American homecoming queen while Rodney Lewis, also an African American student, became its first-ever homecoming king.[28][47][48]

By the mid-1970s, UTA had become one of the most accessible universities in Texas for disabled students, largely due to the activism of the Handicapped Student Association (HSA) and an administration willing to spend money and effort on making campus more accessible. In 1994, Office for Students with Disabilities director Jim Hayes reflected, "I work at probably the greatest university in the world when it comes to a real commitment to the advancement of disabled students. Based on the national picture, UTA has the premiere program from a funding and policy standpoint."[49]

In 1975, the Department of Architecture was separated from the College of Liberal Arts to become the independent School of Architecture.[50] By 1976, UTA had four colleges in addition to schools of architecture and environmental design, nursing, and social work, as well as its Institute of Urban Studies.[1] Also in 1976, the University of Texas School of Nursing at Fort Worth was transferred to UTA, despite protests by its students, becoming the School of Nursing (later the College of Nursing).[51][52] Renamed again to the College of Nursing and Health Innovation (CONHI), it is housed principally at Pickard Hall, named in honor of the nursing school's founding dean, Myrna Pickard.[53] In 1978, UTA created the Office of Continuing Education with the goal of providing cultural enrichment, activities, and non-credit courses.[1]

Left to right, Jenkins Garrett, Virginia Garrett, and Wendell Neddermanin the atrium of Central Library, undated

By fall 1986, total enrollment at UTA reached 23,245, making it the second-largest university in the UT System. That semester, the university offered a total of 49 baccalaureate programs, 53 master's programs, and 18 doctoral programs. By 1986, the UTA Library had acquired 970,000 volumes, more than double the 400,000 volumes it held in 1969. Its Special Collections department most notably had acquired materials relating to cartographic history, the Mexican–American War, minority cultures, the Robertson Colony, Texas labor history, and Texas political history.[1]

In December 1986, the state's Select Committee on Higher Education recognized the University of Houston (UH), the University of North Texas (UNT), and Texas Tech University as emerging national research universities, but not UTA.[54] It deemed the Arlington university instead to be a "comprehensive university" focused on teaching, although UTA considered itself to be a peer of UH, UNT, and Texas Tech.[54][55] Many faculty on campus blamed the Nedderman administration for not demonstrating more clearly to the state government and the public that UTA was also deserving of emerging research university status.[54] Nedderman responded by urging faculty members to write letters to their elected representatives and holding a rally for students and faculty in support of research status. Local politicians, including state senator Bob McFarland, Fort Worth mayor Bob Bolen, and the Arlington City Council, also backed the university in its endeavor. In February 1987, Select Committee chairman Larry Temple announced that UTA's status in the eyes of the committee had been upgraded to that of a research university. He also explaining that its earlier designation as a "comprehensive university" was not meant to be "limiting".[56]

By the early 1990s, many faculty believed that President Nedderman had become resistant to change and had delegated too much authority to the deans of UTA's colleges.[57] In 1991, Nedderman announced his intention to retire at the end of the year, although UT System chancellor Hans Mark asked him to stay in the position until his replacement had been hired. He did so, ultimately retiring on July 13, 1992.[58] In the words of Saxon, "Nedderman's years as president were characterized by an atmosphere of open communication, a free flow of information, and teamwork".[59] Like President Nedderman himself, his administrative team also demonstrated remarkable longevity: three of his four vice presidents served with him for his entire 20-year presidency.[60] Saxon summed up Nedderman's presidency by saying: "Critics would say he was well liked in Austin because he did not make waves for the system, but the reality was that Nedderman was an effective advocate for UTA and a skillful political player."[60] In Saxon's estimation, Nedderman's greatest shortcomings were not effectively raising money from beyond the system, especially from alumni, and his inability to recruit minorities to administrative and faculty positions.[61]

By the end of President Nedderman's tenure in 1992, UTA's student demographics had changed substantially since he had begun as president in 1972. Over those 20 years, the ratio of male-to-female students shifted from approximately 2:1 to nearly 1:1 while African Americans went from 2.6% to 7.2% of the student body, Hispanic students went from 1.9% to 6.3%, and Asian and Pacific Islander students went from less than 1% to 8.5%. In 1992, 47.6% of students were 25 or older. Also, in student surveys conducted throughout the Nedderman era, students consistently stated that their top reasons for enrolling at UTA were its location, low tuition costs, and academic reputation.[58]

Turmoil and decreasing enrollment (1992–99)[edit]

Gerald Saxon, UTA president Ryan C. Amacher, and an unidentified woman in the UTA Library's Special Collections, circa 1990s

In April 1992, Nedderman was succeeded as university president by Ryan C. Amacher.[1][62][63] At his inauguration ceremony, Amacher promised to both actively recruit minority students and employees to UTA as well as market the university aggressively.[62] Amacher was a native of Wisconsin who was educated at Ripon College and the University of Virginia. Before being hired by UTA, he had taught at the University of Oklahoma, Arizona State University, and Clemson University, where he served as the dean of the College of Commerce and Industry. At Clemson, Amacher gained a reputation as a highly capable fundraiser who was very enthusiastic for marketing and outreach. He also worked briefly for the United States Department of the Treasury.[64]

Amacher's early presidency was filled with meetings with stakeholders on campus, which highlighted the widespread desire for change on campus after 20 years of President Nedderman's administration. The first challenge Amacher faced in office was an 8% decline in enrollment over the first three fall semesters of his tenure, which jeopardized UTA's funding because of how Texas allocated money for universities. Worried that raising admission standards would result in fewer students and less funding, Amacher blocked a plan supported by many faculty to raise such standards in fall 1992.[64] By 1993, enrollment stood at 24,783 students.[1] Also by that year, as numerous administrators retired or resigned, Amacher began assembling an administrative team that reflected his own style. Most notable among the new additions was provost Dalmas Taylor. Arriving from the University of Delaware, Taylor fully embraced Amacher's philosophy and also became the highest ranking African American on campus.[65]

As part of his plans for aggressively marketing UTA and increasing its recruiting potential, Amacher decided to heavily invest in its athletics program. Hiring his former Clemson colleague B. J. Skeleton as UTA's new athletic director in October 1992, Amacher brought UTA athletics into full compliance with Title IX. He then proceeded to spend an additional $500,000 on athletics in 1994, raising its budget to $2.9 million and funding both additional personnel and improvements to its facilities. Saxon observed that this represented the first time in UTA history that "an administration was willing to invest significantly in athletics and make sports a priority".[65] While Amacher himself declared that "real universities do athletics" and his goal was for athletics to ultimately "enhance academic programs across the campus", Saxon noted that many on campus saw this as "a costly gamble destined to lose".[66]

Amacher also turned his attention to the lack of student housing on campus. When he was named president, UTA only operated four residence halls, although it also owned 17 apartment complexes around its campus. In 1993, the university partnered with Houston-based Century Property Management Company to open the Centennial Court Apartments just southwest of campus as a public–private partnership. After its second phase was completed in 1995, it housed nearly 1,000 students. As part of the deal, Century paid for both the costs of construction and management of the apartments on land leased from the university. Both Century and UTA split the profits, and after 30 years, the apartments will become the university's property.[66]

In 1994, history professor Alusine Jalloh established the Africa Program at UTA, which provides opportunities for study abroad, outreach projects, and guest lectures, including one by Desmond Tutu.[67] During the 1990s, approximately 7% of UTA's students were African American, while 6% were Hispanic.[1] As has been the case during the ASC era, the student body at UTA tended to be older than at other colleges, worked more, were more likely to be part-time students, and most of them lived off campus.[57]

By the mid-1990s, Amacher was working with the City of Arlington on a proposal for a 19,000-seat multi-purpose arena to accommodate UTA athletics and events while also potentially serving as the home arena for the Dallas Mavericks of the National Basketball Association and the Dallas Stars of the National Hockey League.[68] While this arena was never built, Amacher implemented a single graduation ceremony for the whole university in spring 1994, instead of the traditional separate ceremonies held by UTA's nine colleges and schools. Numerous faculty and students objected to a single ceremony they saw as "long, impersonal, and inconvenient", in part because it was held at the Tarrant County Convention Center in Fort Worth instead of on the UTA campus.[69][70]

Many on campus also disagreed with Amacher's funding priorities, such as his spending of $186,000 to move university administrative offices from Davis Hall to the more centrally located College Hall and his spending of $218,000 on renovating an unused space in the university center into "an upscale dining and meeting facility ideal for entertaining donors and potential donors".[69] Such spending decisions, coupled with what many perceived as his misdirected support for athletics, centralized decision-making style, inability to tolerate criticism, and insensitivity to the desires of students and employees, led to increasingly strong criticism of Amacher from students, faculty, and staff. Over one 18-month period, the president's house was vandalized four times. At the same time, there remained many supporters of the Amacher administration, who highlighted the success it was making in increasing the visibility of UTA, diversifying its faculty and student body, and strengthening ties with alumni as well as the local community. As Saxon described the situation that had developed by fall 1994, "the university was divided into two warring camps, and President Amacher and Provost Taylor seemed incapable of unifying the campus".[71]

In January 1995, Rebecca Sherman wrote an article harshly critical of UTA under the Amacher administration titled "Fast Times at UTA" that was published in the Dallas Observer. It concluded with a quote from a former dean that the campus resembled a wagon "going down the street with all the wheels coming off it".[72][73] This article, combined with similar stories published in The Shorthorn and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, convinced UT System chancellor William H. Cunningham to conduct a thorough audit of the finances and management at UTA. However, before the audit could be completed, UTA's Faculty Senate approved the circulation of a petition that, if signed by 10% of the university's faculty members, would force President Amacher to call a meeting of the faculty and address their concerns. If the faculty were unsatisfied with the results of the meeting, they then could go forward with a motion of no confidence on Amacher and his administration. Amacher strongly objected to the criticism of him and the steps taken by the faculty, declaring to the Faculty Senate that "I've been assassinated unfairly by what is no other fashion than a conspiracy."[73] By February 17, 45% of eligible faculty members had signed the petition, and a meeting between Amacher and the Faculty Senate was scheduled for March 8.[74]

On March 6, 1995, Amacher abruptly announced his resignation in the face of charges that he showed budgetary favoritism to athletics and spent too much on non-essential costs at the expense of academic programs.[1][74] In Amacher's own words, his resignation was "to put an end to the circus atmosphere that has developed on campus".[74][75] Shortly after his resignation, African American students, faculty, and community members, including Lee Alcorn (president of the Dallas chapter of the NAACP) and Darren Reagen (of the Black State Employees Association), advocated for the appointment of Dalmas Taylor as interim president. While Amacher, because of his resignation, did not attend the March 8 meeting with the Faculty Senate, Provost Taylor had to do so. While some admired his bravery in addressing the faculty, few of those in opposition to him changed their minds after the meeting.[74] A faculty vote of confidence in Taylor went ahead, and on March 27 the released results showed UTA faculty expressed no confidence by a 9-to-1 margin. Saxon noted that this vote "surprised even the administration's most vocal critics".[76] Rumors swirled that the decision was at least partially related to race, with African American pre-medicine major Tasha Kendricks describing the confidence vote as a "witch hunt and public lynching of an African American".[76]

African American students advocating for Dalmas Taylor to be named interim president of UTA, 1995

Both before Amacher was hired in 1992 and then again after he resigned in 1995, African American organizations on campus pushed for the selection of an African American president at UTA, but were unsuccessful both times.[1] This was partially due to there not being an African American member of the search committee that ultimately hired Amacher in 1992, nor was an African American candidate considered as a finalist for the position. Furthermore, there were no staff members on that hiring committee, only faculty members.[62]

In 1995, after the vote of no confidence, Taylor was not named president. Instead, University of Texas at Austin dean Robert Witt was named interim president, with the intention of serving for at least two years.[1][76][77] Chancellor Cunningham knew Witt well, and he selected him as UTA's next president largely due to his administrative experience, calm demeanor (in contrast to Amacher), and his status as an outsider "untainted by the controversies" at UTA.[76] Cunningham explained why he did not hire Taylor as president by saying, "There was simply too much bitterness on this campus. We felt we needed to get someone [from] off this campus to begin to heal that process."[78] Witt joined Amacher in being the second UTA president to have a background in business.[33]

Witt was a native of Connecticut who had been educated at Bates College, Dartmouth College, and Pennsylvania State University. He had worked at UT Austin since 1968, rising quickly from assistant professor of marketing to chair of the department in 1973, associate dean for academic affairs in 1983, and finally permanent dean in 1986. During his introductory press conference at UTA, Witt promised to build a campus culture "characterized by a mutual respect and trust".[78] He was given broad authority to assemble his administrative team, with the principal goal of restoring tranquility on campus and reconciling the pro-Amacher and anti-Amacher camps.[79] From the beginning of his administration, Witt faced numerous challenges, including dealing effectively with racial tension, involving campus stakeholders in decision making, repairing UTA's reputation, dealing openly with the press, and establishing stronger ties with alumni and the community.[80]

Taylor was replaced as provost by George C. Wright, an African American administrator working as vice provost at Duke University. This provoked the ire of some African American students at UTA, who called for UT System chancellor William Cunningham to resign due to his ordering of the audit that led to Taylor's dismissal.[1][79] Less than a week after the system's audit of the Amacher administration placed the blame for turmoil on campus "squarely on President Amacher and Provost Taylor", Witt replaced Taylor's team in the provost's office with selections of his own.[79]

By 1995, UTA had attained Doctoral University I status in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Most on campus believed that it would eventually attain the Carnegie Classification's highest status, Research I, the same status as UT Austin and Texas A&M University had already reached.[81] Also in 1995, UTA commemorated its centennial with a yearlong celebration. President emeritus Nedderman spoke at the kickoff event, suggesting "with all due respect to General Motors, that UTA is the heartbeat of Arlington".[82][83] That event, on August 30, 1995, included other speakers as well as a parade, a salute by the Carlisle cannons, and the unveiling of a historical marker documenting the history of the university.[84]

By fall 1996, total enrollment fell for the fifth consecutive year, to 21,097.[85] By fall 1998, enrollment dropped further, to 19,121,[86] which was over 6,000 students fewer than in 1993.[1] The number of faculty members also shrunk to 1,214.[1] During the 1990s, male enrollment dropped at UTA, in terms of both total enrollment and as a percentage. It fell from 12,484 (53% of the student body) in 1993 to 9,526 (49%) by 1997.[87]

In 1997, UTA established its Center for Professional Teacher Education, which evolved into the School of Education in 1999 and ultimately the College of Education in 2003.[88]

Return to growth and stability (1999–2020)[edit]

In fall 1999, enrollment finally increased again, to 19,148 students, reversing seven consecutive years of decline.[89] By fall 2000, enrollment increased to 20,424, up almost 2,000 since two years previous, but still over 4,000 students less than in 1993.[1] In fall 2001, minority enrollment grew 18% compared to fall 2000, with African Americans composing 11.8% of the student body, Hispanic students making up 10.6%, Asian Americans at 9.67%, and Native Americans at 0.78% that semester.[90] In fall 2002, UTA student enrollment grew by 12.5%, its largest increase since 1991.[91] It was also the largest increase in students in the UT System at the time.[92] Indian students were the largest group of international students, making up 45.3% of international students that semester.[93] In August 2002, a substantial increase in demand for on-campus residence hall housing caused a wait list of approximately 1,000 students.[94] However, as student enrollment increased, the number of tenured faculty at UTA decreased by 17% between 1995 and 2001.[95] By summer 2003, the university's continuing growth in enrollment outpaced its growth in funding.[96] By fall 2003, as total full-time enrollment reached 13,972, the average age of students also decreased.[97] In September 2004, UTA's total enrollment reached 25,297 students, an all-time university record.[98]

In July 1999, a committee answering to the UT System Board of Regents proposed creating multiple flagship universities in the UT System, similar to the model used by the University of California System.[99] Some supporters of the plan argued for UT Dallas, UT San Antonio, and the University of Houston to be named additional flagships, but President Witt stressed that UTA would also be considered.[99][100] In March 2001, state representative Kenn George proposed House Bill 3568, which would have merged UTA with UTD and the UT Southwestern Medical Center in an effort to create a single flagship university in North Texas.[101] UTA president Witt also supported this bill.[102] A similar bill proposed by state senator Chris Harris, and likewise supported by Witt, endeavored to increase funding for Texas universities not designated flagships, which would have benefited UTA.[103] In March 2003, state representative Toby Goodman proposed legislation to separate UTA from the UT System and give it an independent board of regents, largely in an effort to attempt to make sure the university "receives a fair share of funding and is treated equally in the system".[104]

The honors program at UTA was upgraded to an Honors College in 1999, the first of its kind in North Texas and just the third in the state.[50][105] In November 2002, President Witt cut UTA's graduate French and German programs, lamenting that they were collectively a "well-designed program with excellent faculty but not enough graduate enrollment to be able to economically back it".[106]

In 2001, UTA collaborated with the City of Arlington and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce to begin operating the Arlington Technology Incubator, which was formally dedicated and became fully functional by 2005. The purpose of the incubator was to aid "technology-based entrepreneurial ventures in the community".[107] In August 2002, the UTA budget was $247.1 million, the largest in university history.[108] In September 2004, the university's budget had grown to $310.6 million.[109] In April 2010, as part of efforts to reduce its budget by $9 million to comply with state mandates, UTA offered voluntary buyouts to over 200 staff members.[110] In March 2011, it also offered voluntary buyouts to 113 faculty members.[111]

In January 2003, President Witt resigned to take the position of president at the University of Alabama.[112] In February, UT System vice chancellor Charles A. Sorber was named interim president of UTA.[113] In November, Michigan State University dean James D. Spaniolo was named UTA's permanent president,[114][115] in a decision considered surprising by many on campus.[116]

UTA began admitting students who were provisionally accepted to UT Austin in June 2001.[117] In April 2003, UTA signed an agreement with Tarrant County College (TCC) that allowed TCC students to more easily transfer to UTA while also encouraging them to apply to the university.[118] In September 2003, the UTA Undergraduate Assembly passed a resolution to increase admission standards,[119] which was approved by the Board of Regents in November in an effort to help recruit students.[120] In November 2004, a UTA committee submitted a report to the university provost arguing that UTA's graduation rate was too low.[121] Enrollment for 2006–07 declined slightly from 25,432 the previous academic year to 24,832, due in part to the implementation of tougher admissions standards.[122] In September 2010, UTA inaugurated a new University College with the goals of "enhancing student services and improving retention".[123] By fall 2011, the University Center was credited with helping to raise UTA's freshman retention rate by 4% (to 74%).[124]

In 2003, the Arlington Archosaur site was discovered, with excavations beginning in 2008 by a team led by UTA paleontologist Derek Main. Fossils unearthed during the excavations were sent to the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.[125] In 2007, UTA research assistant Brad Carter discovered a new species of lungfish as a fossil in the Woodbine Formation in northern Arlington.[126] In 2008, a team lead by UTA professor and PhD student Derek Main discovered a new species of archosaur as fossils at the Arlington Archosaur Site in the northern part of the city.[127][128] In August 2017, a team of UTA astrophysicists led by Suman Satyal discovered a potential exoplanet orbiting the star Gliese 832.[129]

By fall 2005, the number of African American faculty on campus had fallen to 45, of whom only six were tenured. According to management professor and diversity researcher Myrtle Bell, the number of Black faculty members on campus had been consistently decreasing since 1996.[130]

In fall 2006, the College of Education announced a new doctoral program in K-16 Educational Leadership and Policy.[131] In December 2007, Maxine Adegbola and Gloria Carr became the first PhD graduates from UTA's nursing program.[132][133] In 2009, UTA's School of Nursing established a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program,[134] while the university began offering its Executive Masters in Business Administration program at its Fort Worth Center.[135]

In 2008, Carrizo Oil and Gas drilled for natural gas via hydraulic fracturing at the corner of Pecan Street and Mitchell Street on campus.[136] In January 2009, the university received its first royalty check from the natural gas drilling, worth over $500,000.[137] In September 2009, Carrizo announced they would be drilling four to seven additional natural gas wells on the southeastern portion of the campus.[138]

In fall 2009, enrollment reached a record 28,084, a 12% increase.[139] In fall 2010, enrollment increased to a new record of 32,956,[140] and the growth rate of 17.3% since fall 2009 made UTA the fastest-growing institution in the UT System.[141] In 2012, UTA had the largest population of transfer students of any university in the country (8,649).[142] By 2013, approximately 4,300 UTA students lived in residence halls on campus, markedly more than in previous years.[143] By spring 2015, enrollment reached 47,977 students, including online students.[144] In fall 2015, UTA had 37,008 Texas-based students.[145] Between fall 2012 and summer 2014, enrollment of Indian students at UTA increased by 56%. By summer 2014, 9% of the student body consisted of international students.[146] In February 2014, UTA was recognized as a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI) after its Hispanic enrollment reached 7,335, surpassing the 25% of total enrollment required to become an HSI.[147][148][149] By spring 2015, Hispanic enrollment reached 8,062, a 10% increase over spring 2014 numbers.[150]

In January 2010, UTA's School of Nursing was renamed the College of Nursing.[151] Starting in September 2014, the College of Nursing and the Department of Kinesiology began collaborating on research proposals.[152] In November 2014, UTA received permission from the UT System Board of Regents to rename the College of Nursing the College of Nursing and Health Innovation (CONHI) and rename the College of Education and Health Professions simply the College of Education.[153] In January 2015, the School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Public Affairs announced they would merge into a single school.[154] In November 2015, the combined schools officially became the College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs (CAPPA).[155]

In June 2012, President Spaniolo announced his retirement after a new university president was selected.[156] On June 1, 2013, he was succeeded as president by Vistasp Karbhari, the provost at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.[157][158][159] Following Jack Woolf and Wendell Nedderman, Karbhari became the third UTA president with a background in engineering.[51]

In fall 2013, UTA's history department established a minor in disability studies program.[160] In fall 2018, the Disability Studies Minor separated from the History Department to form its own program under the College of Liberal Arts.[161] In fall 2014, the College of Business eliminated its bachelor's degree in economics program due to declining enrollment in the program,[162] while the College of Engineering established a new minor in sustainability.[163] In fall 2018, the UTA College of Business launched a fully online Master of Business Administration program.[164]

In 2014, the UTA Alumni Association collapsed after it lost operational and programming support from the university. In July 2015, it was reestablished as an independent organization run by volunteers.[165]

In 2015, the largest program at UTA in terms of students was nursing, and business was second largest.[33] In spring 2016, CONHI's enrollment increased to 12,178, making it the largest college at UTA and giving it 31.5% of the total student population.[166] In fall 2017, UTA's total enrollment increased to 41,715 (a 5% increase over fall 2016),[167] it welcomed its largest-ever freshman class (3,346 students),[168] and female enrollment as a percentage reached an all-time high (59.3%).[169] In fall 2017, CONHI became the largest college at UTA after increasing by 16.7% since fall 2016.[170] International student enrollment decreased by 233 between fall 2016 and fall 2017, part of a national trend.[171] In February 2018, Troy Johnson, UTA's vice president for enrollment management, credited the university's increasing reputation and greater recognition for its increased enrollment.[172] In fall 2018, UTA's Hispanic enrollment reached 11,615 students, a 7.37% increase over fall 2017.[173]

In February 2016, UTA was awarded R1 (Doctoral Universities - Highest Research Activity) status by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.[174][175] In March 2018, the University College was renamed the Division of Student Success to more clearly articulate its purpose.[176] In November 2018, UTA created a new Chief Sustainability Officer and hired Meghna Tare for the position, in an effort to increase the scope of the Office of Sustainability.[177]

Crisis and transition (2020–present)[edit]

On March 4, 2020, President Karbhari announced his resignation, a month after a former vice president filed a $200,000 lawsuit against the university following her termination in 2019, accusing Karbhari of bullying and threatening to terminate her.[178][179] Initially planning to resign on August 31, Karbhari resigned effective immediately on March 19 after the release of a 2019 audit report that showed UTA appeared to violate university rules, UT System rules, and state laws.[180] Provost Teik Lim was named administrator in charge on March 19, and on May 2 was named interim president of UTA.[181] Lim, formerly a dean at the University of Cincinnati, had joined UTA as its provost and vice president for Academic Affairs in June 2017.[182]

On March 12, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, UTA announced that it was extending its ongoing spring break an additional week and then resuming classes online only on March 23.[183][184] On March 17, UTA decided to keep all classes for the spring 2020 semester online only, require students to vacate residence halls, and postpone spring commencement ceremonies.[185] In April, it also made all summer classes online only.[186] For the fall semester, UTA transitioned to a mix of online, in-person, and hybrid classes, transitioning to online-only classes again after Thanksgiving.[187][188] In spring 2021, UTA continued to offer a mix of on-campus, online, and hybrid classes.[189] That semester, UTA mandated masks and daily self-monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms.[190] UTA returned to primarily on-campus instruction and resumed hosting on-campus events in fall 2021,[191][192][193] while mandating randomized COVID-19 testing of 20% of its students, faculty, and staff each week.[194]

On June 11, 2020, UTA's African American Faculty and Staff Association, Center for African American Studies, and Multicultural Affairs office collaborated to host a virtual town hall meeting about systemic racism on campus after the murder of George Floyd and widespread protests in response to it.[195] On July 9, Lim announced eight initiatives UTA was making to address systemic racism on campus, including establishing a new vice-president position focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion and creating a Diversity and Inclusion Committee by fall 2020.[196][197] In March 2021, UTA selected Bryan Samuel as its inaugural vice president for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. He was formerly Kansas State University's chief diversity and inclusion officer.[198] In May 2021, UTA renamed Davis Hall as the University Administration Building. It had previously been named for former university administrator and eugenics advocate Edward E. Davis.[199]

For the fall 2020 semester, UTA made standardized test scores optional for both undergraduate admissions and scholarship applications.[200] That semester, UTA enrolled its largest-ever freshman class, totaling 3,820 students.[201] In February 2021, UTA closed for an entire week during the Texas power crisis.[202][203] In August 2021, UTA became the fourth university to achieve Texas Tier One status, joining Texas Tech, UH, and UTD. The designation by the state recognized it as an "emerging research university" and allowed it to gain access to the state's National Research University Fund, worth approximately $6.2 million annually.[204]

Building and campus development[edit]

Arlington State College aerial view, circa 1967

In the mid-1960s, ASC constructed a new student health center, completed an addition on its student center, built an auditorium and a theater, ungraded its physical education building, and also expanded parking on campus. At this point the main campus of the college comprised 130 acres (53 ha), while it also owned another 100 acres (40 ha) of what had formerly been farmland to the west of the main campus.[205] In 1967, UTA's Central Library, which had been built as a two-story building in 1964, was expanded to a height of six stories.[46] This was primarily funded by the UT System at a cost of $12.1 million. Also shortly after ASC joined the UT System, the system allocated $1.4 million for a mathematics and languages building and $350,000 for an addition to its men's physical education building. Joining the UT System prompted ASC to revise its master plan, which had been drafted in 1960. The updated master plan emphasized making the campus more walkable by turning streets into pedestrian malls. It also recommended the development of a compact campus with mostly low-rise buildings.[205] This plan considered the new library and Texas Hall to form the main axis on campus and recommended developing the southern edge of the campus, where it bordered Mitchell Street, into a "beauty spot".[206]

During President Harrison's tenure from 1968 to 1972, numerous new buildings were constructed on campus, including Hammond Hall and Trimble Hall (1968), Carlisle Hall (1969), the Business-Life Science Building and University Hall (1970), and Davis Hall (1971). In 1972, construction began on the new Fine Arts Building, which cost $8 million to build.[31] By that year, the campus spanned a total of 197 acres (80 ha). A self-study report from the early 1970s also contained the first mention of a plan to lower Cooper Street, which carries Farm to Market Road 157 through the heart of campus, although it would take 20 years for this goal to be realized.[207] Ultimately, in November 1990, UTA, the City of Arlington, and the State of Texas collaborated to lower Cooper Street and build pedestrian bridges over it after wheelchair athlete Andrew David Beck was struck and killed while crossing the road in January 1989.[208][209]

In 1977, UTA failed to receive funding for a new special events center that would have cost $14 million and accommodated 10,000 spectators for basketball and volleyball in addition to special events. This special events center was never built.[210] In 1978, the College of Business Administration building was dedicated.[33] In 1982, UTA received funding for constructing its Architecture Building and a thermal energy building.[210] In 1984, UTA, along with all the universities in both the UT and A&M systems, were granted access to the Permanent University Fund for the first time, although only for classroom and research building construction.[1][211]

In 1986, there were 85 buildings on the UTA campus that were collectively valued at $238 million. The campus itself had by then expanded to 348 acres (141 ha) in size.[1] In 1987, UTA opened a new Automation and Robotics Research Institute as a satellite campus at River Bend in Fort Worth in partnership with the Fort Worth Chamber Foundation.[1][212] Saxon considered it among the most notable additions to the physical campus during the Nedderman era.[212] In 1989, UTA opened a new engineering complex that cost $39.9 million.[1] In 1991, the building originally named Engineering II was renamed Nedderman Hall in honor of UTA president Wendell Nedderman.[213] The total cost of construction on campus during Nedderman's tenure (1972–92) was over $158 million.[214]

In October 1999, UTA unveiled a new 20-year master plan, the first new master plan for the university in 33 years. Highlights of the plan included 22 new buildings proposed to be built over the next 20 years, a main entrance to UTA developed at the intersection of Border and College streets, and the closure of several streets to create pedestrian walkways on campus.[215] In January 2001, UTA demolished Pachl Hall, a 52-year-old residence hall.[216] In 2004, it dedicated a new residence hall, Kalpana Chawla Hall.[217][218] In 2005, the City of Arlington and UTA bid together for the George W. Bush Presidential Library,[219][220] but their combined bid was not one of the four finalists selected in October of that year.[221]

In January 2006, the Chemistry and Physics Building was opened, a 128,000-square-foot (11,900 m2) building containing mostly laboratories as well as a planetarium.[222] Also in 2006, the university redeveloped a section of West Street on campus into a pedestrian mall at a cost of $100,000.[223] In 2007, UTA purchased the Coronado Apartments and Hamilton House on the eastern edge of campus for $2.9 million, with the goal of demolishing them and converting the 2.5 acres (1.0 ha) of land they stood on into green space for the eastern side of campus.[224] In October and November 2008, the university demolished the Coronado Apartments with the goal of replacing it with a landscaped park and a trail as part of the City of Arlington's Center Street Pedestrian Trail.[225]

In August 2007, UTA opened the Smart Hospital, a nursing simulation facility with manikins able to simulate bleeding, breathing complications, and childbirth.[226] In September of that year, the university opened the Maverick Activities Center (MAC), its new campus recreation facility.[227] In April 2008, UTA installed the first green roof in the DFW Metroplex on the Life Science Building,[228] and in September 2008 the Engineering Research Complex became the first certified Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building on the campus.[229] In November 2009, UTA announced that it would make its entire campus tobacco-free by August 2011.[230]

Greene Research Quad and the Engineering Research Building, 2021

In January 2011, UTA opened the new Engineering Research Building, which was constructed at the cost of $126 million.[231] In April, the university opened the College Park Green, a park in the College Park District on the eastern edge of campus.[232] In August of that year, UTA constructed a 35-foot (11 m) tower as a landmark building at the corner of UTA Boulevard and South Cooper Street. It was built with $481,666 left over from the construction of the Engineering Research Building.[233] In February 2012, UTA opened its new College Park Center as the home to its men's basketball, women's basketball, and women's volleyball teams as well as events.[82][234] In April 2012, the university purchased the Johnson Creek Crossing Apartments on South Pecan Street for $17.8 million, which it renamed The Heights on Pecan. The building provided UTA with approximately 300 more rooms for students living on campus.[235]

In spring 2018, UTA opened a new parking garage on the west side of its campus.[236] In July 2018, 82-year-old Brazos Hall, the smallest and oldest dormitory on campus, was demolished.[237][238] Brazos Park, situated on the former site of Brazos Hall,[239] was opened in August 2019.[240] In August 2018, The Commons, a new dining facility on west campus, and the new West Hall, a residence hall, were both opened.[241][242][243] In September 2018, UTA opened its new Science and Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) Building.[244][245] In February 2019, UTA acquired the Centennial Court apartments, which had previously been privately operated, and integrated them into its University Housing department.[246] In March 2019, the university opened its new Military and Veteran Services (MAVS) Center.[247]

In November 2019, the UT System Board of Regents allocated $60 million in funding for a new building for the UTA School of Social Work,[248] after President Karbhari addressed the 86th Texas Legislature in February about the dire state of the current Social Work building, which was built in 1922.[249] In 2019, UTA demolished its Maple Square and Garden Club apartments, both of which had been built in 1964 and had reached the end of their useful lives.[250] In December 2019, UTA demolished Trinity House, a residence hall on the west side of campus.[251] In September 2020, UTA opened its "grand entrance" addition on the University Center, the completion of a $9.8 million expansion project.[252]

Student life[edit]

See also: University of Texas at Arlington Rebel theme controversy

By the conclusion of the ASC era in 1967, there were 91 active student clubs and organizations on campus, more than four times more than in 1957.[15]

UTA was not a major center for student protest during the 1960s and 1970s, although it did witness smaller protests both for and against the Vietnam War, against the Middle Eastern policy of President Jimmy Carter, against the construction of the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant in Glen Rose, and against those responsible for the Iran hostage crisis. The Ku Klux Klan also staged a protest on campus during a speech by Alex Haley.[57]

A dancer in costume during UTA's International Week, 1987

In September 1975, UTA hosted its largest-ever single event, an "Urban Survival Fair" that drew 65,000–70,000 attendees. Co-sponsored by UTA's Institute of Urban Studies and Dallas radio station KZEW, it featured live music in addition to 85 booths distributing information about art, education, and social service organizations.[253][254] UTA has celebrated International Week since 1977, which features the customs, dance, fashion, and food of thousands of UTA's international students.[255]

Since 1980, one of the most enduring traditions at UTA is bed racing, involving mounting wheels on bed frames with mattresses. The races are run at Maverick Stadium.[256][257] Since 1981, UTA has held an Activity Fair to welcome students to campus and connect them with leadership and volunteer opportunities.[258] In more recent years, the Activity Fair is held in conjunction with the Maverick Cookout, which features university faculty and staff serving burgers and drinks to students, as part of the larger Maverick Stampede series of events introducing students to campus and to fellow students.[259] Since 1989, students, faculty, staff, and alumni have competed annually in oozeball, a mud volleyball competition with proceeds helping to fund student scholarships.[260]

In 1985, UTA's practice of occasionally showing X-rated films on campus resulted in controversy when Baptist Student Union president Greg Sullivan protested the screening of the films Emmanuelle 2 and Story of O. State Senator Robert McFarland and Representative Jan McKenna, both representing Arlington, also expressed outrage over the practice and threatened withholding state funding to the university.[261] In response, President Nedderman developed a new policy that banned any X-rated films with "strong sexual content" from being screened on campus unless they were for a "legitimate academic or educational program".[262] While the resolution to the controversy was satisfactory to McFarland and McKenna, it was criticized as "an arbitrary kind of standard" by the Fort Worth chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and disapproved by 87% of the student body, according to a poll conducted by The Shorthorn.[262]

After UTA's football program was terminated in 1985, homecoming moved from football season in the fall to the spring to better align with basketball season.[260] In 2012, homecoming returned to the fall.[260][263]

Beginning in 1989, every student in the engineering program at UTA was represented by their nation's flag hanging in Nedderman Hall.[213] In 2006, President James Spaniolo removed all 123 flags from the Hall of Flags after protests by the local Vietnamese American community following the inclusion of the flag of the extant Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnam) and not the historic flag of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam).[264][265] The decision ended the 17-year existence of the Hall of Flags,[265][266] and in an open forum in June 2006 Spaniolo declared that the flags would not return to Nedderman Hall in the foreseeable future.[266]

In February 1991, a pro-Operation Desert Storm rally was held on UTA's Library Mall after the beginning of the Gulf War.[267] In September 2005, the university declared Fridays to be "Spirit Days" and encouraged students, faculty, and staff to wear UTA apparel on those days.[268] In spring 2016, industrial and organizational psychology major Erin Porche started Natural Kinks, a natural hair club, on campus.[269]

In February 2018, UTA's chapter of Phi Gamma Delta was suspended for three years after an investigation, although no further details were provided.[270] In April 2019, UTA suspended all fraternity and sorority activities on campus due to "concerns regarding the culture of the fraternal community both at UTA and nationally".[271] President Karbarhari elaborated that the decision was made due to "cases of hazing, sexual assault, extreme intoxication, and other inappropriate behaviors connected to some members of our Greek Community".[272] In August 2019, UTA allowed fraternities and sororities to resume operation after each met new requirements mandated by the university, such as more training and limits on alcohol at events.[273]

Among the most notable guest speakers on campus in the UTA era were Jane Fonda in 1970 and vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro in 1984.[57][274][253] Pakistani prime minister Benazir Bhutto spoke on campus in 2007.[275] In 1975, country musician Willie Nelson played a benefit concert at UTA for its athletic department.[253]

Per campus lore, it is considered good luck to rub the head of the bronze bust of former president E. H. Hereford, which is on display in the Hereford University Center.[276] Another legend concerns a white elephant that is reputedly buried on the UTA campus. Former UTA professor John D. Boon explained that paleontology professor C. L. McNulty needed to create a collection of vertebrate skeletal elements. To accomplish this, UTA's biology and paleontology departments had bought the skeleton of an elephant named "Queen Tut", who lived and died at the Fort Worth Zoo, from the Fort Worth Rendering Company for $24. In order to clean the skeleton, it was buried in a parking lot near Maverick Stadium.[277] The skeleton was exhumed a few years later and added to the collections of UTA's Geology Department. A second elephant skeleton was similarly purchased by the university and cured on the roof of UTA's Science Building instead of being buried.[278]

Notable alumni[edit]

See also: List of University of Texas at Arlington people

In 1971, Tommy Franks graduated from UTA with a degree in business. After serving in the Vietnam War and the Gulf War, he rose to the rank of general before leading the American invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003.[279][280] In 1984, Kalpana Chawla graduated from UTA with a master's degree in aerospace engineering. In 1997, she became the first Indian woman to fly into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia,[38] and she was killed while flying on the Columbia again in 2003 when it disintegrated during reentry.[38][281] UTA subsequently named both a residence hall and a scholarship in her memory.[38][217] Actor Lou Diamond Philips also graduated from UTA in 1984.[282]

Athletics[edit]

ASC football player Mel Witt, one of the first African Americans on the team, 1966

After Memorial Stadium was demolished in 1972, the UTA football team was forced to play games on local high school fields until Maverick Stadium was opened in September 1980.[283] While it never recaptured the successes it achieved in the 1950s and generally struggled on the field while attracting often lackluster crowds, during the UTA era the football team won the Pecan Bowl in 1967 and won the Southland Conference (SLC) championship in 1981.[284]

In November 1985, President Nedderman announced the elimination of the football program, which was losing nearly $1 million per season.[262][284][285] In the words of Saxon, this was money that "could be used to further the university's primary mission of teaching and research, but instead was supporting a financially weak football program".[262] Another reason for the elimination of the football program was its sagging attendance, which declined from 7,950 per game in 1980, the first year at Maverick Stadium, to just 5,600 per game in 1985. The team had the poorest attendance of any school in the SLC, despite UTA having the largest total enrollment in the conference. A third reason was that the cost of football was drawing funding away from UTA's other athletics teams, making them less competitive. The decision to end the football program was opposed by UTA's Maverick Club athletic booster organization and community leaders such as Tom Cravens and Tom Vandergriff, and the resulting controversy even prompted Nedderman to refuse to talk to the press for two weeks after the initial announcement. Regardless, in the aftermath of his decision Nedderman received twice as many letters and calls voicing support for cutting football than those that were critical of his decision.[286]

Tim McKyer, who played on the final 1985 UTA football team, went on to win three Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers and the Denver Broncos.[287] UTA political science professor Allan Saxe summarized his perceptions of student attitudes toward eliminating the football team by stating "70 percent [of UTA students] would say they are not heartbroken over dropping football. 10 percent are heartbroken, and the remaining 20 percent did not know UTA even had a team."[288] UTA also eliminated its swimming program by the early 1980s.[1][289] As of 2015, UTA is the only college in the country with a marching band but no football team.[290]

Final men's basketball game at Texas Hall, view from the floor looking at the stage, 2012

Between 1965 and the opening of College Park Center in 2012, UTA's basketball and volleyball teams played at Texas Hall, a multipurpose auditorium built to hold concerts and theatrical plays in addition to athletics.[291][283] On February 1, 2012, the university opened College Park Center, the home to its men's basketball, women's basketball, and women's volleyball teams, with a basketball doubleheader against the University of Texas at San Antonio.[82][234][292][293] The arena has also hosted professional boxing[294][295] and professional wrestling since its opening.[296] After gaining approval from the UT System Board of Regents to lease the arena,[297] College Park Center became the new home arena of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA)'s Dallas Wings after the franchise relocated from Tulsa, Oklahoma, before their first season in Arlington in 2016.[298]

On July 1, 2012, UTA left the SLC and joined the Western Athletic Conference (WAC).[299][300] It remained in the WAC only for one year, leaving it to join the Sun Belt Conference (SBC) on July 1, 2013.[301]

In 1973, after the passage of Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments Act, UTA began sponsoring four women's sports: basketball, softball, track, and volleyball.[302] That was also the first year that women's athletics received a line item in the university budget.[58] During the 1980s, these four sports remained the four options for intercollegiate athletics for women at the university, while men's teams were fielded in baseball, basketball, golf, tennis, and track.[1] Cross country and tennis have subsequently been added as women's sports.[302] In 1990, The Dallas Morning News investigated the impact of cutting football on the remaining sports at UTA, finding that their competitiveness had improved after the demise of the football program. Conference championships were won by softball in 1988, men's track and field in 1988 and 1989, and women's volleyball in 1990. The volleyball team also went on a 54-game conference winning streak that was active through 1990.[54]

The men's basketball team qualified for the NCAA Division I tournament in 2008.[291] The 2007–08 team won the SLC championship for the first time in program history, winning a record 21 games in the process and qualifying for the NCAA tournament.[303] A #16 seed in the tournament, they were defeated by #1 seed Memphis, 87-63, in their first-ever NCAA tournament game.[304] The 2011–12 team won the SLC regular-season championship,[305] and the 2016–17 team won the SBC regular-season championship.[306]

The women's basketball team qualified for the NCAA Division I tournament in 2005 and 2007.[291][307] The 2004–05 women's basketball team qualified for the NCAA tournament for the first time in its history after winning the SLC title game against Louisiana–Monroe. Selected as a #13 seed in the tournament, they played their first-round game against #4 seed Texas Tech at Reunion Arena in Dallas, losing 69-49.[308] In 2006–07, the women's basketball team set a program record for wins in a season (24), went undefeated in SLC play, and made an appearance in the NCAA tournament, their second in three seasons.[309] In 2018–19, the women's basketball team won a regular-season SBC title.[310]

UTA Freewheelers wheelchair basketball player Abu Yilla and UTA volleyball player Judith McGill, 1985

The volleyball team advanced all the way to the Final Four in the 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament.[58][311] That team defeated the reigning national champion Texas Longhorns en route to the Final Four in Hawaii, where they lost to eventual national champions Long Beach State.[312] The UTA volleyball program has won SLC titles in 1982, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1992.[58]

In 1990, the baseball team won its first conference championship, defeating Sam Houston State in the SLC title game.[313] It won another conference title in 1992.[314] In 1993, star player Clay Gould won the SLC Player of the Year award. In 1999, as head coach Butch McBroom retired after leading the team since 1974, Gould was named head coach at the age of just 27.[313][315] After being diagnosed with colon cancer in 2000, Gould continued to coach through the end of the season, but ultimately died from the disease in June 2001.[313][316] In April 2003, UTA's baseball field was renamed Clay Gould Ballpark in his memory.[313][317] In June 2004, UTA baseball player Hunter Pence was selected 64th overall in the 2004 Major League Baseball draft by the Houston Astros, making him the highest draft pick in UTA baseball history.[318] The 2006 team won the SLC tournament championship and qualified for the NCAA tournament,[319] and the 2012 team again won the SLC conference tournament,[320] qualifying it for that year's NCAA tournament.[321]

In 1986 and again in 1989, the softball team won SLC championships.[314]

In 1986 and 1991, the women's cross country team won conference championships.[58] The men's track and field team won outdoor conference championships in 1989, 1990, 1991, and 1992. It also won indoor conference championships in 1990, 1991, and 1992.[314] In October 2012, the UTA men's cross country team won the WAC championship.[322] In February 2014, the UTA men's track and field team won the indoor SBC title,[323] and in May 2014, it won the outdoor conference championship.[324] The team won the 2017 SBC Outdoor Track and Field Championships in May 2017,[325] and the SBC Indoor Championship in February 2019.[326] In November 2014, the UTA women's track and field team won the SBC conference championship.[327] In fall 2015, the UTA men's cross country team won the SBC conference title,[328] and it repeated as conference champions in fall 2016.[329] In June 2018, UTA high jumper Alexus Henry won an individual national championship at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships.[330]

The women's tennis team has won six regular-season SLC titles, winning their last championship in 2011.[331] The men's tennis team won the SLC championship in 2010,[332] and the SBC championship in 2016.[333]

The men's golf team won the SLC championship in 2005,[334] and again in 2011.[335] In 2017, UTA established a women's golf program.[336][337]

Established in 1976, the Movin' Mavs men's wheelchair basketball team has won nine national titles, the most recent in 2021.[338][339] The team was founded by UTA alumnus Jim Hayes as the Freewheelers in 1976, and in 1988 they joined the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and changed their name to the Movin' Mavs.[339] After they won their third consecutive national championship in 1993, they were invited to the White House by President Bill Clinton.[314][340] In 2002, the Movn' Mavs became the first ever college team to make the semifinals of the professional-division National Wheelchair Basketball Tournament.[341] In October 2009, James Patin of the Movin' Mavs wheelchair tennis team won a national championship,[342] and in October 2014, the UTA wheelchair tennis team won the ITA/USTA Intercollegiate Wheelchair Tennis National Team Championships.[343] In fall 2013, UTA established a women's wheelchair basketball team, commonly known as the Lady Movin' Mavs.[344] In March 2016, they won their first NWBA National Intercollegiate Wheelchair Basketball Tournament,[345] and in March 2018, they won their second national championship.[346] Five members or alumni of the Movin' Mavs and Lady Movin' Mavs competed in wheelchair basketball at the 2016 Summer Paralympics: Abby Dunkin, Aaron Gouge, Rose Hollermann, Mike Paye, and Jorge Sanchez.[347][348]

The UTA cheer squad has won national championships in its division in 2010,[349] 2014,[350] 2015,[351] 2016,[352] 2017,[353] and 2018.[354]

In 1982, UTA mechanical engineering professor Robert Woods created a Formula SAE team that designs and builds a race car for competition every year. The UTA Formula SAE team has won both national and international competitions, and in 2014 it was ranked fifth in the world.[339] In September 2004, the team won its first-ever international competition against 26 other cars in Japan.[355] In September 2015, it won the Sports Car Club of America Nationals.[356]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzaaHamlett, Samuel B. (June 15, 2010). "University of Texas at Arlington". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  2. ^"Texas A&M Thanked by ASC Chief". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. April 22, 1965. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.comFree to read.
  3. ^Saxon 1995, p. 103
  4. ^ abcdeSaxon 1995, p. 89
  5. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, pp. 119–121
  6. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 99
  7. ^ abcBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 53
  8. ^Sharp, Justin (January 19, 2010). "UTA's first black graduate gives keynote speech". The Shorthorn. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  9. ^Coit, Taylor (August 24, 2021). "UTA's first Black graduate remembered for his kindness, wisdom". The Shorthorn. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  10. ^McGee, Patrick (February 19, 2004). "UTA's first black graduate to be honored". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  11. ^Saxon 1995, p. 92
  12. ^Saxon 1995, p. 90
  13. ^ ab"Masters for ASC Approved". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. July 19, 1966. Retrieved May 30, 2020 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  14. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 47
  15. ^ abcdSaxon 1995, p. 100
  16. ^"ASC Students Get Fraternal Units OK". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. October 21, 1966. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  17. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 107
  18. ^Burnett, Destiny (August 30, 2017). "Fraternity and Sorority Life celebrates 50 years on campus". The Shorthorn. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  19. ^Saxon 1995, p. 101
  20. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 55
  21. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 107
  22. ^"Expanding Campus, Curricula Will Keep Pace With Needs". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. December 10, 1967. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  23. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 125
  24. ^ abBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 50
  25. ^Hand, Martha (April 26, 1968). "UTA President, Woolf, Resigns". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  26. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 108
  27. ^Saxon 1995, p. 91
  28. ^ abcdeSaxon 1995, p. 119
  29. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 109
  30. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 110
  31. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 111
  32. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 118
  33. ^ abcdBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 120
  34. ^ abBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 122
  35. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 44
  36. ^"Negro educator accepts UTA teaching, counseling posts". Grand Prairie Daily News. August 1, 1969. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  37. ^Saxon 1995, pp. 110–111
  38. ^ ab
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_University_of_Texas_at_Arlington_(1965%E2%80%93present)

Tarrant county college spring break 2015 -

Approved by Keller ISD Board members on Feb. 8, 2018, the 2018-19 Keller ISD school calendar is now available.

“The 2018-19 calendar was developed by a committee composed of teachers, parents, community members, District administrators, and support staff,” according to the official Keller ISD website. “The committee worked collaboratively to design a calendar that is conducive to student learning while also meeting policy requirements.”

The first day of school will be Wednesday, August 15, 2018, with the last day of school falling on Thursday, May 23, 2019.

May 24, 2019 would be a teacher workday ahead of the Class of 2019 Graduation day on May 25, 2019.

Like the 2017-18 calendar, the 2018-19 calendar puts Fall and Spring Semester finals before Winter Break and Graduation Day.

2018-19 Final Board Approved

2018-19 Keller ISD Holidays

Winter Break will be held December 20, 2018, through January 7, 2019; and Spring Break will be March 11-15, 2019.

Additional District-wide holidays include:
Labor Day – Monday, September 3, 2018
Columbus Day/Fall Weekend – Monday, October 8, 2018 (Students will also be off October 9)
Thanksgiving Break – November 19-23, 2018
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – Monday, January 21, 2019
Bad Weather Make-Up Day – Friday, April 19, 2019

There are also days designated for Student Holidays and Teacher/Staff Professional Development:

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 (Part of a four-day Columbus Day/Fall Weekend for students)
Monday, January 7, 2019
Monday, February 18, 2019
Friday, May 24, 2019

Additionally, there are four dates designated as Early Release Days:

Tuesday, December 18, 2018 (MS and HS only, Final Exams)
Wednesday, December 19, 2018 (PreK-12th grade)
Wednesday, May 22, 2019 (MS and HS only, Final Exams)
Thursday, May 23, 2019 (PreK-12th grade)

Developing the Calendar

“In developing the 2018-19 calendar, the Calendar Committee took a number of things into consideration, including:

  • The Texas Education Agency’s required number of instructional minutes;
  • Teacher contract days and the placement of professional development and major holidays breaks;
  • Desire for an October “mini-break;”
  • Parental custodial rights and components of the standard Texas divorce decree;
  • Ending the first semester before Winter Break
  • Compatibility with other surrounding school districts and Tarrant County College; and
  • Additional input received from campuses and community members.

The calendar features 76,455 minutes of instructional time, 855 of which can be used in place of lost instruction due to school closures caused by inclement weather,” Keller ISD organizers stated.

 

Other content that might interest you

Источник: https://www.timbercreektalon.com/2018/02/2018-19-keller-isd-calendar/

2019 News Releases

Path to graduation included years on Death Row

12/10/19

Ryan Matthews was just 17 years old when he was arrested for murder. Two years later, a Louisiana jury sentenced him to death row. He’d spend five years there before DNA evidence cleared him of the crime.

Now, he’s set to receive his bachelor of applied arts and sciences degree from Texas Woman’s University during the 9 a.m. commencement ceremony Saturday, Dec. 14, in Pioneer Hall.

Study shows benefits of Spanish-language literacy program

12/5/19

Citing the growing number of Latino English learners and the lack of evidence-based educational opportunities they are provided, evaluators with the American Institutes of Research (AIR) teamed with the Texas Woman’s University Reading Recovery program for a randomized controlled study of Descubriendo la Lectura (DLL), a literacy program for bilingual first-graders who are having difficulty learning to read and write in their native Spanish.

Project aims to produce more Hispanic teachers

12/3/19

Texas Woman’s University will use a $500,000 federal grant to recruit and educate more Hispanics as teachers to address teacher shortages in the state. The university is partnering with Tarrant County College District and other community colleges to create a path for teacher candidates to transfer from a two-year school to complete their bachelor’s degree at TWU.

TWU team tackles astronaut shoulder injuries in NASA competition

11/19/19

Texas Woman’s University sends its third team of senior undergraduate kinesiology students to the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase in Houston this week. They will compete against engineering and technology teams from universities across the state who are working to solve research problems identified by NASA. TWU’s Good Vibrations will be the only team to have a project focused on the human aspect of space travel.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Dec. 7, 2019

11/18/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 8 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7 on the university’s Denton campus.

Gates selected for Virginia Chandler Dykes Award

11/18/19

Dallas City Councilmember Jennifer Staubach Gates has been named the recipient of the 18th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation.

Texas Woman’s Chancellor Carine M. Feyten will honor Councilmember Gates on Feb. 20, 2020 at the Dallas Leadership Luncheon chaired by Ralph Hawkins, chairman emeritus with HKS, Inc. and recipient of the 2015 Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.

TWU named Best for Vets: Colleges 2020

11/8/19

Texas Woman’s University has been named one of the best colleges for veterans, coming in at No. 47 in the nation, according to Military Times.

TWU Theatre presents ‘The Architecture of Loss’

11/6/19

The Texas Woman’s University Theatre Program continues its 2019-2020 season with the world premiere of “The Architecture of Loss” Nov. 20-24. The production will integrate elements theatre, dance and music to explore and express feelings of loss, grief and healing in the aftermath of death.

Chemistry educator honored with 2019 Chancellor's Alumni Excellence Award

10/18/19

Texas Woman’s University alumna and internationally recognized chemist E. Ann Nalley, Ph.D., has been named the 2019 recipient of the TWU Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award. Throughout her career of more than 50 years, Nalley, the Clarence L. Page Endowed Chair of Mathematics and Science Education at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma, has worked to advance the visibility of women in the traditionally male-dominated chemistry field.

TWU to host Pioneer Research at the Mall Nov. 2

10/16/19

Texas Woman’s University faculty and students will present their research to the public 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, in the Golden Triangle Mall food court. Pioneer Research at the Mall is an annual event designed to engage the Denton community in discussions about current and upcoming research projects taking place at TWU.

To the Top of the World and Back

10/15/19

TWU alumna Roxanne Vogel has taken mountain climbing to new heights. 

An experienced mountaineer who’s climbed the tallest mountains on nearly all the continents, Vogel set a unique goal for herself to become the first person to scale Mt. Everest – going up from sea level, to the top of the world and back down – in a record-making two weeks. By comparison, the average climber takes two months to climb the world’s tallest peak.

Alumna's 'Unique' program wins national award

10/2/19

Texas Woman's alumna Christina Buce was in her first year as an elementary school counselor when her principal challenged her to “get creative” with the school’s awareness days — those days focusing attention on key health issues. Buce’s response not only captured the hearts and minds of the school community, but won a national award as a Character.org Promising Practice as well. 

TWU Theatre presents ‘Macbeth’

10/6/19

The Texas Woman’s University Theatre Program opens its 2019-2020 season with William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” Directed by associate professor Steven Young, “Macbeth” tells the tragic tale of a warrior who receives a prophecy that he will become the king of Scotland.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Oct. 19, 2019

9/30/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 19 on the university’s Denton campus.

TWU alumna Merrilee Kick turns class project into multi-million-dollar business

11/5/19

In 2009, Merrilee Kick was a high school teacher enrolled in TWU’s Executive MBA program wanting to make more money to support her family. Things were tough, and she needed a great business plan both for her capstone project and her future. What she got was the inspiration and drive that would completely change her life.

Villavaso lands Fullbright grant, strives to fight for human rights

9/24/19

Recent graduate Morgan Villavaso chose to attend TWU because she was inspired by its purpose and mission, which is “rooted in the truth that educating women empowers the world.” She chose to study sociology because of its humanitarian focus. “Sociology taught me to move through the world with a conscientious and critical lens,” said Villavaso.

TWU reports record enrollment for fall 2019

9/18/19

Student enrollment at Texas Woman’s University reached a record 15,846 for fall 2019, a 2% increase over the previous year, according to preliminary figures announced today by the university.

Opportunity is key to bilingual ed path for Hoyos

9/17/19

A college professor could write a lengthy dissertation on the importance of sharpening Spanish and English skills in schoolchildren, but Jessica Hoyos can sum up her position in short order: “I want young people to think of Spanish as a strength, not a weakness.”

So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that Hoyos, a Texas Woman’s University senior interdisciplinary studies major with a concentration in bilingual education, is passionate about becoming a teacher.

TWU to host Graduate School and Professional Fair Sept. 17, 2019

9/3/19

Texas Woman’s University will host a Graduate School and Professional Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Pioneer Hall located on Bell Avenue in Denton. For a map of the Denton campus, visit TWU maps. Free visitor parking with shuttle service is available at the Denton Bible Church.

TWU Regents approve construction for sports facility

8/9/19

On Aug. 9, the Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents authorized construction of an $11.5 million sports building to support the university’s existing soccer, softball and intramural programs as well as future competitive sports.

Texas Woman's launches biliteracy certificate program

8/1/19

This fall, Texas Woman’s University launches a new graduate certificate in biliteracy, the only one of its kind in the state. Educators can earn the certificate with the option of applying the credits toward a master’s degree in reading education.

Pioneer Pride dance team claims bragging rights

7/31/19

The Texas Woman’s University Pioneer Pride dance team placed first in Division II schools during the National Dance Team Camp held in Dallas on the SMU campus July 20-22, beating out DBU, Tarleton and Angelo State.  

Texas Woman’s STEM project awarded $1 million grant

7/9/19

The National Science Foundation has awarded Texas Woman’s University a five-year, $999,794 grant to support scholarships and projects aimed at increasing the number of students and graduates in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

TWU lists Spring 2019 graduates

6/21/19

Texas Woman’s University held Spring 2019 commencement ceremonies May 10-12. Graduates are listed according to their hometowns. Students from areas other than Texas are listed alphabetically by state or country.

TWU dental hygiene students, faculty provide services in Peru

6/19/19

For the past three years, TWU dental hygiene clinical professor Leslie Koberna and her students have ventured to Guatemala, working in make-shift facilities and mobile dental units to treat and clean the teeth of orphans, school children and families who might not get these services elsewhere. Last month, Koberna took her students 2,000 miles further south to provide dental hygiene services to nearly 300 people in Lima, Peru, during an 11-day faculty-led education abroad experience.

TWU student wins national advising research award

6/19/19

Texas Woman’s University doctoral candidate Elia S. Tamplin has received the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Student Research Award for their presentation, "Research on Women-of-Color Professional Experiences in Higher Education." Tamplin will be recognized with a plaque and a one-year membership at NACADA’s annual conference in Louisville, Kentucky October 20-23.

Texas Woman’s doctoral student named 2019-20 Schweitzer Fellow

6/17/19

Morgan Grant, a Texas Woman’s University health promotion and kinesiology Ph.D. student from Valdosta, Georgia, will spend the next year creating a sexual health empowerment and education program through a prestigious Dallas-Fort Worth Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. Grant, who earned his MBA from TWU in 2017 and recently became certified as a health education specialist, will work with a community agency to address HIV/STD prevention for minority and at-risk populations who identify as a member of the LGBTQIA community in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

TWU program assesses firefighters' health, wellness

6/13/19

For more than 20 years, Texas Woman’s University’s Institute for Women’s Health has offered wellness programs and performed health research. This year, a group of first responders— firefighters in the Denton Fire Department (DFD)—is taking advantage of the services available in the clinic. Denton firefighters can earn bonus pay for maintaining or improving specified wellness levels. To help them monitor these levels, the DFD signed a three-year agreement with TWU’s Institute for Women’s Health to assess the health and fitness of the department’s 170 firefighters annually.

TWU alumna Nitashia Johnson wins Sony Creator-in-Residence Award

6/13/19

Texas Woman’s University alumna Nitashia Johnson recently completed her residency in the 2019 Sony Alpha Female Creator-in-Residence Award Program, which included $25,000 in grant money, $5,000 in film and photography gear as well as mentorship, networking, exhibition and educational opportunities.

TWU releases Spring 2019 deans', chancellor's lists

6/13/19

Texas Woman's University has released its deans' and chancellor's lists for the Spring 2019 semester.

Undergraduate students who complete at least 12 graded credit hours and achieve at least a 3.5 grade point average are eligible for the deans' list. Students who have achieved a 4.0 GPA are named to the chancellor's list.

TWU taps national nursing leader as new dean

5/29/19

Texas Woman’s University today announced that Rosalie Mainous, a former collegiate dean, NIH-funded researcher, and the current director of academic nursing development for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), will become dean of TWU’s College of Nursing, effective Aug. 5.

D'Abrosca tapped to be next TWU student regent

5/24/19

Texas Woman’s University junior Lexi D’Abrosca has been appointed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to serve as the next student representative on the Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents. Her term expires May 31, 2020.

Capstone project yields success for students, health providers

5/23/19

As one of the largest public hospital systems in the country, Parkland Health & Hospital System handles more than 1 million outpatient visits a year and it fiscal year 2018 it provided more than $1.02 billion in uncompensated care.

The safety-net hospital and the 20 community clinics it operates rely heavily on funding from Medicare and Medicaid, charities and property taxes to sustain its operations. Adequate revenue sources are crucial to the operation of the 125-year-old Parkland system.

With that as a backdrop, two teams of Texas Woman’s University Health Systems Management students this year embarked on a plan to help boost Parkland’s bottom line.

TWU Board of Regents approves promotions and tenure

5/23/19

The Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents approved promotions and tenure recommendations at its quarterly meeting May 17 at the TWU T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences-Dallas Center. Regents also awarded emeritus status to retiring faculty and staff.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day June 8, 2019

5/21/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Saturday, June 8 on the university’s Denton campus.

TWU to conduct Spring 2019 Commencement

5/6/19

The Spring 2019 semester at Texas Woman’s University will draw to a close with commencement ceremonies scheduled Friday and Saturday, May 10-11 on TWU’s Denton campus, and Sunday, May 12 in Houston.

Graduation ceremony recognizes family members’ support

4/27/19

It wasn’t your typical pomp and circumstance.

Roughly 70 soon-to-be-graduates at Texas Woman’s University took part in a special ceremony Saturday to honor their children and other family members for their support during the students’ journey through college.

Governor Abbott appoints four to TWU Board of Regents

4/24/19

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has appointed Carlos Gallardo to the Texas Woman's University Board of Regents for a term set to expire on February 1, 2021. Additionally, the Governor appointed Robert “Bob” Hyde and Stacie McDavid and reappointed Mary Pincoffs Wilson for terms set to expire on February 1, 2025.

TWU students design garment to help astronauts fight back pain

4/19/19

A group of Texas Woman's University kinesiology seniors, known as the Acolytes of Apollo, have been working this semester on a special garment designed to reduce lower back pain experienced by astronauts in microgravity. The team presented their project at the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase on April 15, and placed fourth out of 14 teams at this semiannual competition sponsored by NASA.

TWU Athletics Director to lead new Pioneer MoneyWise Center

4/16/19

Texas Woman's University officials today announced the creation of a new center to help students manage their finances and have appointed Chalese Connors to lead the strategic effort. Connors has served the university for more than two decades, including the past 18 years as director of athletics. In her new role, she will be charged with building a center that will educate students about financial literacy and student loan debt.

TWU herbarium director receives conservation award

4/15/19

Texas Woman’s University biology professor and herbarium director, Camelia Maier, Ph.D., received the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) Conservation Medal at the 120th Annual State Conference of the Texas Society Daughters of the American Revolution. In addition to the medal, Maier received a certificate from Texas State Regent Susan Tillman at the awards dinner in Houston in March.

TWU hosts Autism Awareness night at Frisco RoughRiders ballpark

4/12/19

Texas Woman's University faculty and students hit a home run in early April when they managed an Autism Awareness Night for children and their families at a Frisco RoughRiders baseball game. According to Gwen Weatherford, director of TWU's sport management program, the baseball team specifically requested support from TWU. Twenty TWU occupational therapy students and faculty members managed the event, with hosting support from TWU students in sport management and kinesiology

TWU to dedicate math and technology success center in honor of Don Edwards, Ph.D.

4/11/19

Texas Woman’s University will rename its math tutoring center in honor of retiring TWU Department of Mathematics and Computer Science professor and chair, Don Edwards, Ph.D. The “Dr. Don Edwards Mathematics & Technology Success Center” dedication ceremony will take place during a retirement reception at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Apr. 23 on the third floor of the Multipurpose Classroom and Laboratory Building.

TWU returns to NASA design challenge

4/10/19

Texas Woman's University's Acolytes of Apollo wowed everyone last November when they won top honors at the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase, competing against engineering and technology teams from universities across the state. Another TWU Acolytes team hopes to do the same next week when they show an improvement to the design developed last year.

Phi Kappa Phi chapter earns top honors

4/3/19

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines — recently recognized the Texas Woman's University chapter of Phi Kappa Phi as a Circle of Excellence Platinum Chapter, the highest commendation a chapter can receive from the organization.

TWU student to present undergraduate research at Capitol

3/26/19

Texas Woman’s University biology senior Hanna McDonald will be among a select group of undergraduate researchers from across the state presenting their work at the Undergraduate Research Day at the Texas Capitol in Austin on April 1.

TWU grad draws from personal success to inspire others

3/19/19

She graduated first in her class at Lake Worth High School and had a penchant for math, so it seemed like a good bet that Adriana Blanco would earn a degree in that discipline at Texas Woman’s University and then teach.

TWU Theatre presents ‘Cabaret’

3/19/19

 The Texas Woman’s University Theatre Program will conclude its 2018-2019 season with the Tony Award-winning musical Cabaret, written by Joe Masteroff, John Kander and Fred Ebb. The show will run April 4-7 and 11-13.

TWU presents ArtsWalk: Learning the Land April 4

3/18/19

The Texas Woman’s University School of the Arts invites area residents to join students, faculty and staff for ArtsWalk: Learning the Land. Event participants will interact with works by artist and designer Molly Sherman and explore sites on TWU’s Denton campus and surrounding areas. This free, all-ages event will be held from 5:15 to 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4.

Register now for TWU summer camps

3/14/19

Looking for educational and fun activities for your children this summer? Texas Woman's University provides a variety of camps for local children of all ages. Dance and theatre, writing, science and technology, sports and speech round out the offerings on the university's Denton campus.

TWU Jamison Lecture to feature US Congresswomen Sylvia Garcia and Kay Granger

3/11/19

U.S. Congresswomen Sylvia Garcia and Kay Granger will speak at Texas Woman’s University’s fourth annual Jamison Lecture, beginning at 7 p.m., March 21 on the university’s Denton campus. The lecture, titled “Women on the Rise: Reflections on the 2018 Election,” will take place in Margo Jones Performance Hall on Pioneer Circle. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Ferguson embarks on third Alternative Spring Break volunteer trip

3/12/19

While most students are on vacation or enjoying a relaxing break from school, Shiley Ferguson donates her time to others through Alternative Spring Break (ASB) volunteer programs. Ferguson has already participated in two ASB trips and will embark on her third and final trip this year before graduating with a nursing degree in May.

Student, Mom, Employee, Superhero, Nataleigh Ritchey

2/27/19

Just two weeks before graduating from Collinsville High School in Collinsville, Texas, Nataleigh Ritchey received shocking news. She was pregnant.

Many high school graduates look forward to college and career aspirations. Facing her future, she realized it would look a little different for her now. Nevertheless, Nataleigh was determined to accomplish her degree.

TWU breaks ground on science and research center

2/22/19

Texas Woman's University officials today broke ground on a new science and research center that will add critical research space and enhance efforts to increase research activities at the institution.

2019 Edible Car Contest winners announced

2/11/19

Texas Woman’s University hosted its 21st annual Edible Car Contest Friday, Feb. 8. The contest challenged Dallas-Fort Worth area grade school students to combine their creative ideas with principles of mathematics and physics.

Sager designs official tartan, makes university history

1/29/19

From volunteering at the Texas Fashion Collection, designing and modeling in many TWU fashion shows, participating in the Alpha Alpha Chapter of the Phi Upsilon Omicron Honor Society and practicing Irish Step Dancing, Sager had a busy schedule. Then she designed Texas Woman’s official tartan.

New Graduate and Nigerian American, Alexander Adegbembo

1/28/19

Alexander Adegbembo and his family, having arrived in the US in early 2011, are a picturesque example of the opportunity and life-changing fortune of a new life in the United States as immigrants.

“My case is like winning the lottery,” he said. Quite literally.

TWU Department of Public Safety earns accreditation

1/28/19

The Texas Woman’s University Department of Public Safety has joined the ranks of only 1.5 percent of university police departments to achieve accreditation by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, the leading authority for campus public safety.

Doctoral family therapy program earns national accreditation

1/24/19

The family therapy doctoral program at Texas Woman’s University recently received national accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE), becoming only the third doctoral program in Texas accredited by the agency, and the only one in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Jones leads gymnastics team in back-to-back national championships

1/22/19

Passion and focus helped Schyler Jones lead the TWU gymnastics team to back-to-back national championships in 2017 and 2018. Chances are pretty good those two personality traits will play a major role as she pursues a longtime dream of becoming a teacher.

Music and dance centers offer supportive environments for lifelong education

1/15/19

Texas Woman’s University invites children, teens and adults to register for Spring 2019 Community Music and Community Dance Center lessons. Classes are taught by faculty members or graduate students at TWU’s Denton campus and include introductory, intermediate and advanced courses, culminating in a recital performed for an audience of friends and family.

TWU taps veteran lawyer for general counsel post

1/14/19

Texas Woman’s University has hired Katherine Antwi Green, a lawyer with 25 years of legal experience in government and higher education, as its next general counsel and associate vice president for compliance.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Feb. 2, 2019

1/14/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year students — from 8 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2 on the university’s Denton campus.

TWU 2019 Parry Lecture to Focus on Indigenizing Health Professions

1/11/19

Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing in Houston will host the annual Parry Distinguished Lectureship Thursday, March 7, from 5-7 pm, at the Houston campus in the Texas Medical Center. Margaret Moss, Ph.D., JD, RN, FAAN, Director of the First Nations House of Learning and nursing faculty member at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, will present “Indigenizing the Health Professions,” with a focus on health care for Native Americans and Alaska natives.

Wife, Mother, Student, La Toya Hart

1/14/19

When La Toya Hart—a Sherman, Texas, native—decided she wanted to get her college degree, she knew there was only one place she wanted to attend: Texas Woman’s University.

A wife of 17 years and mother of two sons, La Toya had been an early childhood educator and once her youngest received a diagnosis of ADHD, they made the decision to have her stay home and homeschool him while running an in-home daycare.

Sterling Stinson, Student entrepreneur

1/10/19

Sterling Stinson, a junior from Ponder, Texas, would likely agree with the old adage, “Variety is the spice of life.” Not one to shy away from a challenge or new experience, Sterling has been sure to rack up as many rich and diverse experiences while at TWU as she can.

Page last updated 4:53 PM, October 7, 2021 

Источник: https://twu.edu/news-events/news/archive/2019-news-releases/

History of the University of Texas at Arlington (1965–present)

Aerial view of the University of Texas at Arlington campus, circa 1967–1969

The history of the University of Texas at Arlington since 1965 comprises its history since joining the University of Texas System (UT System). In April 1965, the Texas Legislature transferred Arlington State College (ASC) from the Texas A&M University System to the UT System. In 1966, Maxwell Scarlett became the first African American graduate in ASC's history. In March 1967, ASC was renamed the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA). Jack Woolf, who had served as president of ASC and then UTA since 1959, resigned the presidency in 1968 and was succeeded by Frank Harrison, who would serve as president until 1972. Also in 1968, UTA awarded its first master's degrees, all in engineering. In 1969, UTA hired Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at the university.

In 1972, Harrison resigned and Wendell Nedderman was named his successor, ultimately serving as president for 20 years. During his tenure, the university constructed 24 buildings, created 64 new degree programs, and grew from 14,028 students to 25,135. From the start of the Nedderman administration to the end, UTA's student demographics changed substantially: the ratio of male-to-female students shifted from approximately 2:1 to nearly 1:1 while African Americans went from 2.6% to 7.2% of the student body, Hispanic students went from 1.9% to 6.3%, and Asian and Pacific Islander students went from less than 1% to 8.5%. By the mid-1970s, UTA had become one of the most accessible universities in Texas for disabled students.

In April 1992, Nedderman was succeeded as university president by Ryan C. Amacher. Focused on actively recruiting minority students and employees to UTA as well as marketing the university aggressively, Amacher and his administration polarized the campus before his sudden resignation in March 1995 in the face of charges that he showed budgetary favoritism to athletics and spent too much on non-essential costs at the expense of academic programs. He was replaced by University of Texas at Austin dean Robert Witt as UTA's enrollment continued to decline for seven consecutive years in the 1990s. UTA returned to growing enrollment by 1999, reaching an all-time high of 25,297 students in fall 2004. In November 2003, Michigan State University dean James D. Spaniolo was named UTA president. In 2013, he was succeeded by Vistasp Karbhari, who served as president until resigning in 2020 in the face of a lawsuit by a former vice president and the release of an audit report.

The UTA campus has grown substantially since 1965, with the addition of numerous new buildings, including College Park Center, the Engineering Research Building, and the Science and Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) Building. Student traditions have also developed considerably over the same timespan, with examples being bed racing, oozeball, and International Week. Among the most notable athletics events of the UTA era were the termination of the university's football program in 1985, the women's volleyball team advancing to the Final Four in the 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament, and the Movin' Mavs and Lady Movin' Mavswheelchair basketball teams winning nine and two national championships, respectively.

Last years as Arlington State College (1965–67)[edit]

In April 1965, the Texas Legislature transferred Arlington State College (ASC) from the Texas A&M University System to the University of Texas System (UT System).[1][2] At the time, the college's total student enrollment was 11,873.[3] The transition also marked ASC's new requirement that incoming students had an "aptitude for doing college work", according to historian and writer Gerald Saxon, which was based on both SAT scores and high school class ranking.[4] After ASC joined the UT System in 1965, it established its College of Business, College of Liberal Arts, and College of Science as stand-alone colleges.[5]Jack Woolf, who had served as president of ASC since 1959, continued to do so after the move to the UT System.[1] Shortly after ASC joined the system, UT System chancellor Harry Ransom asked Frank Harrison, then the associate dean for graduate studies at the UT System's Southwestern Medical School in Dallas, to spend part of his time at ASC to help it establish graduate programs.[6]

In the mid-1960s, male students typically made up 75–80% of the student body.[4] The school had a relatively large number of nontraditional students: 34% of students were married, 60% were 21 or older, 44% worked at least 20 hours per week, and 61% worked at least part-time.[4][7] The two Texas counties providing the most students were Tarrant County and then Dallas County, while California supplied the most out-of-state students and Iran the most international students.[4] In 1966, Maxwell Scarlett became the first African American graduate in ASC's history when he graduated with a bachelor's degree in biology after transferring from North Texas State University.[8][9][10] By 1967, ASC had become firmly established as a commuter school with only a small minority of students living on campus in dormitories.[7]

In 1965–66, ASC had a budget of $9.4 million, but less than $200,000 of this was spent on research.[11] By 1966, the college offered new bachelor's degree programs in accounting, government, and sociology, while also debuting a variety of secondary teaching certificate programs.[12] In summer 1966, ASC gained approval from the College and University Co-ordinating Board to offer master's degree programs beginning that fall,[13] with four different programs offering master's degrees.[1][6][13] In the mid to late 1960s, courses in engineering and the sciences were particularly popular among students.[7]

After UTA became part of the UT System, its previously independent student clubs were allowed to affiliate with national fraternities and sororities beginning in 1966.[14][15][16] The Texas A&M University System had previously not allowed ASC to have national Greek organizations active on campus.[17] In 1967, the first chapters of national fraternities and sororities were established at ASC.[18] During the 1966–67 academic year, student representatives were included on university-wide committees for the first time ever.[19]

Early years as the University of Texas at Arlington (1967–72)[edit]

In March 1967, ASC was renamed the University of Texas at Arlington (UTA).[1][15] President Woolf commented, "I think we have reached a name which does not shackle the future development of the institution."[20] On March 6, 1967, Texas governor John Connally signed into law a bill that renamed each UT System university "the University of Texas at [location]". Unlike the previous plan of the Texas A&M University System to rename ASC "Texas A&M University at Arlington", UTA's new name was received positively by many students, faculty, and administrators. It was widely perceived as increasing the prestige, name recognition, and funding and recruiting abilities of the university. The first diplomas featuring the new name were awarded on May 31, 1967.[15]

In September 1967, UTA's enrollment grew to 11,873, an all-time high, despite the opening of the first Tarrant County Junior College (TCJC) campus that fall.[21][22] Also in 1967, the Institute of Urban Studies was established at UTA by an act of the Texas Legislature. The institute provides planning for economic development, site selection, and transportation as well as feasibility studies.[23]

In 1968, Jack Woolf resigned his position as president, while continuing to serve as a mechanical engineering professor before ultimately retiring in 1989.[21][24][25] In the estimation of Gerald Saxon, Woolf had lost the confidence of the faculty, due largely to his support for remaining in the A&M system and his hierarchical view of leadership, which was better suited to the A&M system than the UT System.[21] During his decade-long tenure as president, Woolf guided the university from junior-college to senior-college status, from the A&M system to the UT System, from an enrollment of less than 5,000 to approximately 12,000, and from a budget of $2.2 million to $11.8 million.[26] In 1966–67, the average salary for full professors was $12,400 to $13,500. By 1968, when President Woolf resigned, faculty salaries at UTA were the fourth highest in Texas. They had been the lowest at any state university or college when he was first named president in 1959.[27] In 1995, UTA renamed the first building constructed during his presidency as Woolf Hall.[24]

Replacing President Woolf was Frank Harrison, who would serve as president until 1972.[1][28] Harrison was appointed acting president shortly after Woolf resigned in September 1968, and then was selected permanent president after a nation-wide search that concluded in June 1969. A native of Dallas, he was educated at Southern Methodist University and Northwestern University before serving as an anatomy professor at both the University of Tennessee and Southwestern Medical School.[26] Harrison had begun working to organize UTA's graduate program in 1965, and by the time he was named acting president two years later, he had extensive knowledge of the university, the system, and the Dallas–Fort Worth metroplex. Although he only served as president for four years, Harrison left a legacy of new programs at UTA: 10 at the bachelor's level, 24 at the master's level, and two at the doctoral level.[29] Another of Harrison's legacies was his transformation of UTA's administrative culture, making it more democratic and open than during the A&M system era. He accomplished this by improving communications with stakeholders throughout the university, giving faculty a greater voice in decision making with seats on committees, and publishing the university budget for the first time ever.[30] Total enrollment during Harrison's tenure as president grew from 12,556 in fall 1968 to 14,028 in fall 1972. Much of this growth was due to an expansion in graduate student enrollment, which grew quickly from 301 to 1,008 over the same four-year span.[31]

Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at UTA, circa 1970

In 1968, UTA's Energy Research Center was established for the study of electrical generation and transmission, and it was soon followed by over ten other research centers in other areas of study.[1] Also in 1968, UTA awarded its first master's degrees (all in engineering),[32] began its business graduate programs,[33] and its School of Social Work began offering the region's first master's degree in social work.[34] The School of Social Work added a bachelor's degree program in 1979 and a doctoral program in 1983, and since its inception in 1968 has been housed in the former Ousley Junior High School building on the north edge of campus, which was built in 1922 as the original Arlington High School.[34] In 1969, UTA created a bachelor of fine arts program,[35] as well as a doctoral program in engineering.[29] Also in 1969, UTA hired Reby Cary, the first African American administrator at the university, as the associate dean of student life.[4][36]

In 1969, the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) in Richardson joined the UT System. It had been founded as a private institution in 1961 by Texas Instruments.[30] UTA remained officially neutral on the addition of UTD to the system, but state representative Don Gladden, Arlington mayor Tom Vandergriff, and Tarrant County representative W. C. Sherman were all opposed to it.[37] Governor Preston Smith achieved a compromise that placated both UTA and UTD supporters by initially restricting UTD to junior-level, senior-level, and graduate-level courses until it began awarding bachelor's degrees in 1975, granting UTA six more years as the only comprehensive public university in the Metroplex.[31]

Linda Garza, the first female electrical engineering graduate at UTA, in 1970

In 1970, Linda Garza became the first woman to graduate with a degree in electrical engineering from UTA.[38] Between 1970 and 1973, UTA phased out its two-year associate degree programs in engineering and transitioned them to TCJC.[39] In August 1971, UTA awarded its first doctoral degrees.[29] Also in 1971, the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare mandated that the university implement an employment affirmative action program by February 1972 after determining that less than 1% of university employees were minorities in 1970.[40]

Continued growth (1972–92)[edit]

In 1972, President Harrison resigned to become president of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, and Wendell Nedderman was named his successor at UTA.[28][41][42] Saxon described Nedderman as "a popular choice" and a person who was "genuinely liked and admired by staff and faculty".[28] Nedderman was a native of Iowa who was educated at Iowa State University and Texas A&M University before serving on the USS Patterson during World War II. In 1947, he began working at A&M before taking the position of engineering dean at UTA in 1959. In Arlington, he later served as graduate school administrator, vice president for research and graduate affairs, and vice president for academic affairs before being named acting president in 1972.[43] Nedderman would serve as president until July 1992, over which time the university constructed 24 buildings, created 64 new degree programs, and grew from 14,028 students to 25,135.[1][41][44]

Graduate student enrollment increased from 936 to over 4,200 under Nedderman. Saxon argues that the main causes of this growth were the baby boomers coming of age, the growing size and economic strength of the Dallas-Fort Worth metroplex, the relatively low cost of attending UTA, the expansion of its programs, and the growth of junior colleges in the area that prepared students for advanced study at UTA.[44] Additionally, Nedderman's tenure saw an increase in the amount of research and publishing conducted by UTA, which came hand-in-hand with developing graduate programs. In 1972, when Nedderman began as UTA president, the university had just $200,000 in outside funding for research, but this grew to $12.7 million by 1992, when Nedderman retired.[45]

The 1970s witnessed an expansion of both UTA's curriculum and the services it offered, including joint doctoral programs with the University of Texas Health Center in Dallas and UTD in biomedical engineering, the humanities, and mathematical sciences. Also during the 1970s, UTA's English Department created Pre/Text, An Inter-disciplinary Journal of Rhetoric as a quarterly journal with a focus on rhetorical theory. At the same time, UTA's Foreign Language and Linguistics Department published the German-instruction journal Schatzkammer, and from 1977 published the Robertson Colony papers.[1] In 1974, the Special Collections department in the UTA Library opened with a donation of over 10,000 books, documents, and maps from Jenkins and Virginia Garrett. The strengths of its holdings are the history of Texas, the broader Southwest, and Mexico.[46]

Rodney Lewis and Wanda Jo Holiday, UTA homecoming king and queen, 1980

In 1972, UTA created a Minority Student Advocacy Caucus and established a Minorities Cultural Center at its library. Between 1970 and 1979, UTA's African American enrollment grew from 176 to 1,065 and its Hispanic enrollment grew from 157 to 594. The 1970s and early 1980s also witnessed a number of African American "firsts" at UTA: Dickie Fears become the first African American cheerleader in 1971 and Royce West become the first African American president of UTA's Student Congress in 1974.[28] In 1980, Wanda Holiday became UTA's first African American homecoming queen while Rodney Lewis, also an African American student, became its first-ever homecoming king.[28][47][48]

By the mid-1970s, UTA had become one of the most accessible universities in Texas for disabled students, largely due to the activism of the Handicapped Student Association (HSA) and an administration willing to spend money and effort on making campus more accessible. In 1994, Office for Students with Disabilities director Jim Hayes reflected, "I work at probably the greatest university in the world when it comes to a real commitment to the advancement of disabled students. Based on the national picture, UTA has the premiere program from a funding and policy standpoint."[49]

In 1975, the Department of Architecture was separated from the College of Liberal Arts to become the independent School of Architecture.[50] By 1976, UTA had four colleges in addition to schools of architecture and environmental design, nursing, and social work, as well as its Institute of Urban Studies.[1] Also in 1976, the University of Texas School of Nursing at Fort Worth was transferred to UTA, despite protests by its students, becoming the School of Nursing (later the College of Nursing).[51][52] Renamed again to the College of Nursing and Health Innovation (CONHI), it is housed principally at Pickard Hall, named in honor of the nursing school's founding dean, Myrna Pickard.[53] In 1978, UTA created the Office of Continuing Education with the goal of providing cultural enrichment, activities, and non-credit courses.[1]

Left to right, Jenkins Garrett, Virginia Garrett, and Wendell Neddermanin the atrium of Central Library, undated

By fall 1986, total enrollment at UTA reached 23,245, making it the second-largest university in the UT System. That semester, the university offered a total of 49 baccalaureate programs, 53 master's programs, and 18 doctoral programs. By 1986, the UTA Library had acquired 970,000 volumes, more than double the 400,000 volumes it held in 1969. Its Special Collections department most notably had acquired materials relating to cartographic history, the Mexican–American War, minority cultures, the Robertson Colony, Texas labor history, and Texas political history.[1]

In December 1986, the state's Select Committee on Higher Education recognized the University of Houston (UH), the University of North Texas (UNT), and Texas Tech University as emerging national research universities, but not UTA.[54] It deemed the Arlington university instead to be a "comprehensive university" focused on teaching, although UTA considered itself to be a peer of UH, UNT, and Texas Tech.[54][55] Many faculty on campus blamed the Nedderman administration for not demonstrating more clearly to the state government and the public that UTA was also deserving of emerging research university status.[54] Nedderman responded by urging faculty members to write letters to their elected representatives and holding a rally for students and faculty in support of research status. Local politicians, including state senator Bob McFarland, Fort Worth mayor Bob Bolen, and the Arlington City Council, also backed the university in its endeavor. In February 1987, Select Committee chairman Larry Temple announced that UTA's status in the eyes of the committee had been upgraded to that of a research university. He also explaining that its earlier designation as a "comprehensive university" was not meant to be "limiting".[56]

By the early 1990s, many faculty believed that President Nedderman had become resistant to change and had delegated too much authority to the deans of UTA's colleges.[57] In 1991, Nedderman announced his intention to retire at the end of the year, although UT System chancellor Hans Mark asked him to stay in the position until his replacement had been hired. He did so, ultimately retiring on July 13, 1992.[58] In the words of Saxon, "Nedderman's years as president were characterized by an atmosphere of open communication, a free flow of information, and teamwork".[59] Like President Nedderman himself, his administrative team also demonstrated remarkable longevity: three of his four vice presidents served with him for his entire 20-year presidency.[60] Saxon summed up Nedderman's presidency by saying: "Critics would say he was well liked in Austin because he did not make waves for the system, but the reality was that Nedderman was an effective advocate for UTA and a skillful political player."[60] In Saxon's estimation, Nedderman's greatest shortcomings were not effectively raising money from beyond the system, especially from alumni, and his inability to recruit minorities to administrative and faculty positions.[61]

By the end of President Nedderman's tenure in 1992, UTA's student demographics had changed substantially since he had begun as president in 1972. Over those 20 years, the ratio of male-to-female students shifted from approximately 2:1 to nearly 1:1 while African Americans went from 2.6% to 7.2% of the student body, Hispanic students went from 1.9% to 6.3%, and Asian and Pacific Islander students went from less than 1% to 8.5%. In 1992, 47.6% of students were 25 or older. Also, in student surveys conducted throughout the Nedderman era, students consistently stated that their top reasons for enrolling at UTA were its location, low tuition costs, and academic reputation.[58]

Turmoil and decreasing enrollment (1992–99)[edit]

Gerald Saxon, UTA president Ryan C. Amacher, and an unidentified woman in the UTA Library's Special Collections, circa 1990s

In April 1992, Nedderman was succeeded as university president by Ryan C. Amacher.[1][62][63] At his inauguration ceremony, Amacher promised to both actively recruit minority students and employees to UTA as well as market the university aggressively.[62] Amacher was a native of Wisconsin who was educated at Ripon College and the University of Virginia. Before being hired by UTA, he had taught at the University of Oklahoma, Arizona State University, and Clemson University, where he served as the dean of the College of Commerce and Industry. At Clemson, Amacher gained a reputation as a highly capable fundraiser who was very enthusiastic for marketing and outreach. He also worked briefly for the United States Department of the Treasury.[64]

Amacher's early presidency was filled with meetings with stakeholders on campus, which highlighted the widespread desire for change on campus after 20 years of President Nedderman's administration. The first challenge Amacher faced in office was an 8% decline in enrollment over the first three fall semesters of his tenure, which jeopardized UTA's funding because of how Texas allocated money for universities. Worried that raising admission standards would result in fewer students and less funding, Amacher blocked a plan supported by many faculty to raise such standards in fall 1992.[64] By 1993, enrollment stood at 24,783 students.[1] Also by that year, as numerous administrators retired or resigned, Amacher began assembling an administrative team that reflected his own style. Most notable among the new additions was provost Dalmas Taylor. Arriving from the University of Delaware, Taylor fully embraced Amacher's philosophy and also became the highest ranking African American on campus.[65]

As part of his plans for aggressively marketing UTA and increasing its recruiting potential, Amacher decided to heavily invest in its athletics program. Hiring his former Clemson colleague B. J. Skeleton as UTA's new athletic director in October 1992, Amacher brought UTA athletics into full compliance with Title IX. He then proceeded to spend an additional $500,000 on athletics in 1994, raising its budget to $2.9 million and funding both additional personnel and improvements to its facilities. Saxon observed that this represented the first time in UTA history that "an administration was willing to invest significantly in athletics and make sports a priority".[65] While Amacher himself declared that "real universities do athletics" and his goal was for athletics to ultimately "enhance academic programs across the campus", Saxon noted that many on campus saw this as "a costly gamble destined to lose".[66]

Amacher also turned his attention to the lack of student housing on campus. When he was named president, UTA only operated four residence halls, although it also owned 17 apartment complexes around its campus. In 1993, the university partnered with Houston-based Century Property Management Company to open the Centennial Court Apartments just southwest of campus as a public–private partnership. After its second phase was completed in 1995, it housed nearly 1,000 students. As part of the deal, Century paid for both the costs of construction and management of the apartments on land leased from the university. Both Century and UTA split the profits, and after 30 years, the apartments will become the university's property.[66]

In 1994, history professor Alusine Jalloh established the Africa Program at UTA, which provides opportunities for study abroad, outreach projects, and guest lectures, including one by Desmond Tutu.[67] During the 1990s, approximately 7% of UTA's students were African American, while 6% were Hispanic.[1] As has been the case during the ASC era, the student body at UTA tended to be older than at other colleges, worked more, were more likely to be part-time students, and most of them lived off campus.[57]

By the mid-1990s, Amacher was working with the City of Arlington on a proposal for a 19,000-seat multi-purpose arena to accommodate UTA athletics and events while also potentially serving as the home arena for the Dallas Mavericks of the National Basketball Association and the Dallas Stars of the National Hockey League.[68] While this arena was never built, Amacher implemented a single graduation ceremony for the whole university in spring 1994, instead of the traditional separate ceremonies held by UTA's nine colleges and schools. Numerous faculty and students objected to a single ceremony they saw as "long, impersonal, and inconvenient", in part because it was held at the Tarrant County Convention Center in Fort Worth instead of on the UTA campus.[69][70]

Many on campus also disagreed with Amacher's funding priorities, such as his spending of $186,000 to move university administrative offices from Davis Hall to the more centrally located College Hall and his spending of $218,000 on renovating an unused space in the university center into "an upscale dining and meeting facility ideal for entertaining donors and potential donors".[69] Such spending decisions, coupled with what many perceived as his misdirected support for athletics, centralized decision-making style, inability to tolerate criticism, and insensitivity to the desires of students and employees, led to increasingly strong criticism of Amacher from students, faculty, and staff. Over one 18-month period, the president's house was vandalized four times. At the same time, there remained many supporters of the Amacher administration, who highlighted the success it was making in increasing the visibility of UTA, diversifying its faculty and student body, and strengthening ties with alumni as well as the local community. As Saxon described the situation that had developed by fall 1994, "the university was divided into two warring camps, and President Amacher and Provost Taylor seemed incapable of unifying the campus".[71]

In January 1995, Rebecca Sherman wrote an article harshly critical of UTA under the Amacher administration titled "Fast Times at UTA" that was published in the Dallas Observer. It concluded with a quote from a former dean that the campus resembled a wagon "going down the street with all the wheels coming off it".[72][73] This article, combined with similar stories published in The Shorthorn and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, convinced UT System chancellor William H. Cunningham to conduct a thorough audit of the finances and management at UTA. However, before the audit could be completed, UTA's Faculty Senate approved the circulation of a petition that, if signed by 10% of the university's faculty members, would force President Amacher to call a meeting of the faculty and address their concerns. If the faculty were unsatisfied with the results of the meeting, they then could go forward with a motion of no confidence on Amacher and his administration. Amacher strongly objected to the criticism of him and the steps taken by the faculty, declaring to the Faculty Senate that "I've been assassinated unfairly by what is no other fashion than a conspiracy."[73] By February 17, 45% of eligible faculty members had signed the petition, and a meeting between Amacher and the Faculty Senate was scheduled for March 8.[74]

On March 6, 1995, Amacher abruptly announced his resignation in the face of charges that he showed budgetary favoritism to athletics and spent too much on non-essential costs at the expense of academic programs.[1][74] In Amacher's own words, his resignation was "to put an end to the circus atmosphere that has developed on campus".[74][75] Shortly after his resignation, African American students, faculty, and community members, including Lee Alcorn (president of the Dallas chapter of the NAACP) and Darren Reagen (of the Black State Employees Association), advocated for the appointment of Dalmas Taylor as interim president. While Amacher, because of his resignation, did not attend the March 8 meeting with the Faculty Senate, Provost Taylor had to do so. While some admired his bravery in addressing the faculty, few of those in opposition to him changed their minds after the meeting.[74] A faculty vote of confidence in Taylor went ahead, and on March 27 the released results showed UTA faculty expressed no confidence by a 9-to-1 margin. Saxon noted that this vote "surprised even the administration's most vocal critics".[76] Rumors swirled that the decision was at least partially related to race, with African American pre-medicine major Tasha Kendricks describing the confidence vote as a "witch hunt and public lynching of an African American".[76]

African American students advocating for Dalmas Taylor to be named interim president of UTA, 1995

Both before Amacher was hired in 1992 and then again after he resigned in 1995, African American organizations on campus pushed for the selection of an African American president at UTA, but were unsuccessful both times.[1] This was partially due to there not being an African American member of the search committee that ultimately hired Amacher in 1992, nor was an African American candidate considered as a finalist for the position. Furthermore, there were no staff members on that hiring committee, only faculty members.[62]

In 1995, after the vote of no confidence, Taylor was not named president. Instead, University of Texas at Austin dean Robert Witt was named interim president, with the intention of serving for at least two years.[1][76][77] Chancellor Cunningham knew Witt well, and he selected him as UTA's next president largely due to his administrative experience, calm demeanor (in contrast to Amacher), and his status as an outsider "untainted by the controversies" at UTA.[76] Cunningham explained why he did not hire Taylor as president by saying, "There was simply too much bitterness on this campus. We felt we needed to get someone [from] off this campus to begin to heal that process."[78] Witt joined Amacher in being the second UTA president to have a background in business.[33]

Witt was a native of Connecticut who had been educated at Bates College, Dartmouth College, and Pennsylvania State University. He had worked at UT Austin since 1968, rising quickly from assistant professor of marketing to chair of the department in 1973, associate dean for academic affairs in 1983, and finally permanent dean in 1986. During his introductory press conference at UTA, Witt promised to build a campus culture "characterized by a mutual respect and trust".[78] He was given broad authority to assemble his administrative team, with the principal goal of restoring tranquility on campus and reconciling the pro-Amacher and anti-Amacher camps.[79] From the beginning of his administration, Witt faced numerous challenges, including dealing effectively with racial tension, involving campus stakeholders in decision making, repairing UTA's reputation, dealing openly with the press, and establishing stronger ties with alumni and the community.[80]

Taylor was replaced as provost by George C. Wright, an African American administrator working as vice provost at Duke University. This provoked the ire of some African American students at UTA, who called for UT System chancellor William Cunningham to resign due to his ordering of the audit that led to Taylor's dismissal.[1][79] Less than a week after the system's audit of the Amacher administration placed the blame for turmoil on campus "squarely on President Amacher and Provost Taylor", Witt replaced Taylor's team in the provost's office with selections of his own.[79]

By 1995, UTA had attained Doctoral University I status in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. Most on campus believed that it would eventually attain the Carnegie Classification's highest status, Research I, the same status as UT Austin and Texas A&M University had already reached.[81] Also in 1995, UTA commemorated its centennial with a yearlong celebration. President emeritus Nedderman spoke at the kickoff event, suggesting "with all due respect to General Motors, that UTA is the heartbeat of Arlington".[82][83] That event, on August 30, 1995, included other speakers as well as a parade, a salute by the Carlisle cannons, and the unveiling of a historical marker documenting the history of the university.[84]

By fall 1996, total enrollment fell for the fifth consecutive year, to 21,097.[85] By fall 1998, enrollment dropped further, to 19,121,[86] which was over 6,000 students fewer than in 1993.[1] The number of faculty members also shrunk to 1,214.[1] During the 1990s, male enrollment dropped at UTA, in terms of both total enrollment and as a percentage. It fell from 12,484 (53% of the student body) in 1993 to 9,526 (49%) by 1997.[87]

In 1997, UTA established its Center for Professional Teacher Education, which evolved into the School of Education in 1999 and ultimately the College of Education in 2003.[88]

Return to growth and stability (1999–2020)[edit]

In fall 1999, enrollment finally increased again, to 19,148 students, reversing seven consecutive years of decline.[89] By fall 2000, enrollment increased to 20,424, up almost 2,000 since two years previous, but still over 4,000 students less than in 1993.[1] In fall 2001, minority enrollment grew 18% compared to fall 2000, with African Americans composing 11.8% of the student body, Hispanic students making up 10.6%, Asian Americans at 9.67%, and Native Americans at 0.78% that semester.[90] In fall 2002, UTA student enrollment grew by 12.5%, its largest increase since 1991.[91] It was also the largest increase in students in the UT System at the time.[92] Indian students were the largest group of international students, making up 45.3% of international students that semester.[93] In August 2002, a substantial increase in demand for on-campus residence hall housing caused a wait list of approximately 1,000 students.[94] However, as student enrollment increased, the number of tenured faculty at UTA decreased by 17% between 1995 and 2001.[95] By summer 2003, the university's continuing growth in enrollment outpaced its growth in funding.[96] By fall 2003, as total full-time enrollment reached 13,972, the average age of students also decreased.[97] In September 2004, UTA's total enrollment reached 25,297 students, an all-time university record.[98]

In July 1999, a committee answering to the UT System Board of Regents proposed creating multiple flagship universities in the UT System, similar to the model used by the University of California System.[99] Some supporters of the plan argued for UT Dallas, UT San Antonio, and the University of Houston to be named additional flagships, but President Witt stressed that UTA would also be considered.[99][100] In March 2001, state representative Kenn George proposed House Bill 3568, which would have merged UTA with UTD and the UT Southwestern Medical Center in an effort to create a single flagship university in North Texas.[101] UTA president Witt also supported this bill.[102] A similar bill proposed by state senator Chris Harris, and likewise supported by Witt, endeavored to increase funding for Texas universities not designated flagships, which would have benefited UTA.[103] In March 2003, state representative Toby Goodman proposed legislation to separate UTA from the UT System and give it an independent board of regents, largely in an effort to attempt to make sure the university "receives a fair share of funding and is treated equally in the system".[104]

The honors program at UTA was upgraded to an Honors College in 1999, the first of its kind in North Texas and just the third in the state.[50][105] In November 2002, President Witt cut UTA's graduate French and German programs, lamenting that they were collectively a "well-designed program with excellent faculty but not enough graduate enrollment to be able to economically back it".[106]

In 2001, UTA collaborated with the City of Arlington and the Arlington Chamber of Commerce to begin operating the Arlington Technology Incubator, which was formally dedicated and became fully functional by 2005. The purpose of the incubator was to aid "technology-based entrepreneurial ventures in the community".[107] In August 2002, the UTA budget was $247.1 million, the largest in university history.[108] In September 2004, the university's budget had grown to $310.6 million.[109] In April 2010, as part of efforts to reduce its budget by $9 million to comply with state mandates, UTA offered voluntary buyouts to over 200 staff members.[110] In March 2011, it also offered voluntary buyouts to 113 faculty members.[111]

In January 2003, President Witt resigned to take the position of president at the University of Alabama.[112] In February, UT System vice chancellor Charles A. Sorber was named interim president of UTA.[113] In November, Michigan State University dean James D. Spaniolo was named UTA's permanent president,[114][115] in a decision considered surprising by many on campus.[116]

UTA began admitting students who were provisionally accepted to UT Austin in June 2001.[117] In April 2003, UTA signed an agreement with Tarrant County College (TCC) that allowed TCC students to more easily transfer to UTA while also encouraging them to apply to the university.[118] In September 2003, the UTA Undergraduate Assembly passed a resolution to increase admission standards,[119] which was approved by the Board of Regents in November in an effort to help recruit students.[120] In November 2004, a UTA committee submitted a report to the university provost arguing that UTA's graduation rate was too low.[121] Enrollment for 2006–07 declined slightly from 25,432 the previous academic year to 24,832, due in part to the implementation of tougher admissions standards.[122] In September 2010, UTA inaugurated a new University College with the goals of "enhancing student services and improving retention".[123] By fall 2011, the University Center was credited with helping to raise UTA's freshman retention rate by 4% (to 74%).[124]

In 2003, the Arlington Archosaur site was discovered, with excavations beginning in 2008 by a team led by UTA paleontologist Derek Main. Fossils unearthed during the excavations were sent to the Perot Museum of Nature and Science in Dallas.[125] In 2007, UTA research assistant Brad Carter discovered a new species of lungfish as a fossil in the Woodbine Formation in northern Arlington.[126] In 2008, a team lead by UTA professor and PhD student Derek Main discovered a new species of archosaur as fossils at the Arlington Archosaur Site in the northern part of the city.[127][128] In August 2017, a team of UTA astrophysicists led by Suman Satyal discovered a potential exoplanet orbiting the star Gliese 832.[129]

By fall 2005, the number of African American faculty on campus had fallen to 45, of whom only six were tenured. According to management professor and diversity researcher Myrtle Bell, the number of Black faculty members on campus had been consistently decreasing since 1996.[130]

In fall 2006, the College of Education announced a new doctoral program in K-16 Educational Leadership and Policy.[131] In December 2007, Maxine Adegbola and Gloria Carr became the first PhD graduates from UTA's nursing program.[132][133] In 2009, UTA's School of Nursing established a new Doctor of Nursing Practice program,[134] while the university began offering its Executive Masters in Business Administration program at its Fort Worth Center.[135]

In 2008, Carrizo Oil and Gas drilled for natural gas via hydraulic fracturing at the corner of Pecan Street and Mitchell Street on campus.[136] In January 2009, the university received its first royalty check from the natural gas drilling, worth over $500,000.[137] In September 2009, Carrizo announced they would be drilling four to seven additional natural gas wells on the southeastern portion of the campus.[138]

In fall 2009, enrollment reached a record 28,084, a 12% increase.[139] In fall 2010, enrollment increased to a new record of 32,956,[140] and the growth rate of 17.3% since fall 2009 made UTA the fastest-growing institution in the UT System.[141] In 2012, UTA had the largest population of transfer students of any university in the country (8,649).[142] By 2013, approximately 4,300 UTA students lived in residence halls on campus, markedly more than in previous years.[143] By spring 2015, enrollment reached 47,977 students, including online students.[144] In fall 2015, UTA had 37,008 Texas-based students.[145] Between fall 2012 and summer 2014, enrollment of Indian students at UTA increased by 56%. By summer 2014, 9% of the student body consisted of international students.[146] In February 2014, UTA was recognized as a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI) after its Hispanic enrollment reached 7,335, surpassing the 25% of total enrollment required to become an HSI.[147][148][149] By spring 2015, Hispanic enrollment reached 8,062, a 10% increase over spring 2014 numbers.[150]

In January 2010, UTA's School of Nursing was renamed the College of Nursing.[151] Starting in September 2014, the College of Nursing and the Department of Kinesiology began collaborating on research proposals.[152] In November 2014, UTA received permission from the UT System Board of Regents to rename the College of Nursing the College of Nursing and Health Innovation (CONHI) and rename the College of Education and Health Professions simply the College of Education.[153] In January 2015, the School of Architecture and the School of Urban and Public Affairs announced they would merge into a single school.[154] In November 2015, the combined schools officially became the College of Architecture, Planning and Public Affairs (CAPPA).[155]

In June 2012, President Spaniolo announced his retirement after a new university president was selected.[156] On June 1, 2013, he was succeeded as president by Vistasp Karbhari, the provost at the University of Alabama in Huntsville.[157][158][159] Following Jack Woolf and Wendell Nedderman, Karbhari became the third UTA president with a background in engineering.[51]

In fall 2013, UTA's history department established a minor in disability studies program.[160] In fall 2018, the Disability Studies Minor separated from the History Department to form its own program under the College of Liberal Arts.[161] In fall 2014, the College of Business eliminated its bachelor's degree in economics program due to declining enrollment in the program,[162] while the College of Engineering established a new minor in sustainability.[163] In fall 2018, the UTA College of Business launched a fully online Master of Business Administration program.[164]

In 2014, the UTA Alumni Association collapsed after it lost operational and programming support from the university. In July 2015, it was reestablished as an independent organization run by volunteers.[165]

In 2015, the largest program at UTA in terms of students was nursing, and business was second largest.[33] In spring 2016, CONHI's enrollment increased to 12,178, making it the largest college at UTA and giving it 31.5% of the total student population.[166] In fall 2017, UTA's total enrollment increased to 41,715 (a 5% increase over fall 2016),[167] it welcomed its largest-ever freshman class (3,346 students),[168] and female enrollment as a percentage reached an all-time high (59.3%).[169] In fall 2017, CONHI became the largest college at UTA after increasing by 16.7% since fall 2016.[170] International student enrollment decreased by 233 between fall 2016 and fall 2017, part of a national trend.[171] In February 2018, Troy Johnson, UTA's vice president for enrollment management, credited the university's increasing reputation and greater recognition for its increased enrollment.[172] In fall 2018, UTA's Hispanic enrollment reached 11,615 students, a 7.37% increase over fall 2017.[173]

In February 2016, UTA was awarded R1 (Doctoral Universities - Highest Research Activity) status by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education.[174][175] In March 2018, the University College was renamed the Division of Student Success to more clearly articulate its purpose.[176] In November 2018, UTA created a new Chief Sustainability Officer and hired Meghna Tare for the position, in an effort to increase the scope of the Office of Sustainability.[177]

Crisis and transition (2020–present)[edit]

On March 4, 2020, President Karbhari announced his resignation, a month after a former vice president filed a $200,000 lawsuit against the university following her termination in 2019, accusing Karbhari of bullying and threatening to terminate her.[178][179] Initially planning to resign on August 31, Karbhari resigned effective immediately on March 19 after the release of a 2019 audit report that showed UTA appeared to violate university rules, UT System rules, and state laws.[180] Provost Teik Lim was named administrator in charge on March 19, and on May 2 was named interim president of UTA.[181] Lim, formerly a dean at the University of Cincinnati, had joined UTA as its provost and vice president for Academic Affairs in June 2017.[182]

On March 12, in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, UTA announced that it was extending its ongoing spring break an additional week and then resuming classes online only on March 23.[183][184] On March 17, UTA decided to keep all classes for the spring 2020 semester online only, require students to vacate residence halls, and postpone spring commencement ceremonies.[185] In April, it also made all summer classes online only.[186] For the fall semester, UTA transitioned to a mix of online, in-person, and hybrid classes, transitioning to online-only classes again after Thanksgiving.[187][188] In spring 2021, UTA continued to offer a mix of on-campus, online, and hybrid classes.[189] That semester, UTA mandated masks and daily self-monitoring for COVID-19 symptoms.[190] UTA returned to primarily on-campus instruction and resumed hosting on-campus events in fall 2021,[191][192][193] while mandating randomized COVID-19 testing of 20% of its students, faculty, and staff each week.[194]

On June 11, 2020, UTA's African American Faculty and Staff Association, Center for African American Studies, and Multicultural Affairs office collaborated to host a virtual town hall meeting about systemic racism on campus after the murder of George Floyd and widespread protests in response to it.[195] On July 9, Lim announced eight initiatives UTA was making to address systemic racism on campus, including establishing a new vice-president position focusing on diversity, equity, and inclusion and creating a Diversity and Inclusion Committee by fall 2020.[196][197] In March 2021, UTA selected Bryan Samuel as its inaugural vice president for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. He was formerly Kansas State University's chief diversity and inclusion officer.[198] In May 2021, UTA renamed Davis Hall as the University Administration Building. It had previously been named for former university administrator and eugenics advocate Edward E. Davis.[199]

For the fall 2020 semester, UTA made standardized test scores optional for both undergraduate admissions and scholarship applications.[200] That semester, UTA enrolled its largest-ever freshman class, totaling 3,820 students.[201] In February 2021, UTA closed for an entire week during the Texas power crisis.[202][203] In August 2021, UTA became the fourth university to achieve Texas Tier One status, joining Texas Tech, UH, and UTD. The designation by the state recognized it as an "emerging research university" and allowed it to gain access to the state's National Research University Fund, worth approximately $6.2 million annually.[204]

Building and campus development[edit]

Arlington State College aerial view, circa 1967

In the mid-1960s, ASC constructed a new student health center, completed an addition on its student center, built an auditorium and a theater, ungraded its physical education building, and also expanded parking on campus. At this point the main campus of the college comprised 130 acres (53 ha), while it also owned another 100 acres (40 ha) of what had formerly been farmland to the west of the main campus.[205] In 1967, UTA's Central Library, which had been built as a two-story building in 1964, was expanded to a height of six stories.[46] This was primarily funded by the UT System at a cost of $12.1 million. Also shortly after ASC joined the UT System, the system allocated $1.4 million for a mathematics and languages building and $350,000 for an addition to its men's physical education building. Joining the UT System prompted ASC to revise its master plan, which had been drafted in 1960. The updated master plan emphasized making the campus more walkable by turning streets into pedestrian malls. It also recommended the development of a compact campus with mostly low-rise buildings.[205] This plan considered the new library and Texas Hall to form the main axis on campus and recommended developing the southern edge of the campus, where it bordered Mitchell Street, into a "beauty spot".[206]

During President Harrison's tenure from 1968 to 1972, numerous new buildings were constructed on campus, including Hammond Hall and Trimble Hall (1968), Carlisle Hall (1969), the Business-Life Science Building and University Hall (1970), and Davis Hall (1971). In 1972, construction began on the new Fine Arts Building, which cost $8 million to build.[31] By that year, the campus spanned a total of 197 acres (80 ha). A self-study report from the early 1970s also contained the first mention of a plan to lower Cooper Street, which carries Farm to Market Road 157 through the heart of campus, although it would take 20 years for this goal to be realized.[207] Ultimately, in November 1990, UTA, the City of Arlington, and the State of Texas collaborated to lower Cooper Street and build pedestrian bridges over it after wheelchair athlete Andrew David Beck was struck and killed while crossing the road in January 1989.[208][209]

In 1977, UTA failed to receive funding for a new special events center that would have cost $14 million and accommodated 10,000 spectators for basketball and volleyball in addition to special events. This special events center was never built.[210] In 1978, the College of Business Administration building was dedicated.[33] In 1982, UTA received funding for constructing its Architecture Building and a thermal energy building.[210] In 1984, UTA, along with all the universities in both the UT and A&M systems, were granted access to the Permanent University Fund for the first time, although only for classroom and research building construction.[1][211]

In 1986, there were 85 buildings on the UTA campus that were collectively valued at $238 million. The campus itself had by then expanded to 348 acres (141 ha) in size.[1] In 1987, UTA opened a new Automation and Robotics Research Institute as a satellite campus at River Bend in Fort Worth in partnership with the Fort Worth Chamber Foundation.[1][212] Saxon considered it among the most notable additions to the physical campus during the Nedderman era.[212] In 1989, UTA opened a new engineering complex that cost $39.9 million.[1] In 1991, the building originally named Engineering II was renamed Nedderman Hall in honor of UTA president Wendell Nedderman.[213] The total cost of construction on campus during Nedderman's tenure (1972–92) was over $158 million.[214]

In October 1999, UTA unveiled a new 20-year master plan, the first new master plan for the university in 33 years. Highlights of the plan included 22 new buildings proposed to be built over the next 20 years, a main entrance to UTA developed at the intersection of Border and College streets, and the closure of several streets to create pedestrian walkways on campus.[215] In January 2001, UTA demolished Pachl Hall, a 52-year-old residence hall.[216] In 2004, it dedicated a new residence hall, Kalpana Chawla Hall.[217][218] In 2005, the City of Arlington and UTA bid together for the George W. Bush Presidential Library,[219][220] but their combined bid was not one of the four finalists selected in October of that year.[221]

In January 2006, the Chemistry and Physics Building was opened, a 128,000-square-foot (11,900 m2) building containing mostly laboratories as well as a planetarium.[222] Also in 2006, the university redeveloped a section of West Street on campus into a pedestrian mall at a cost of $100,000.[223] In 2007, UTA purchased the Coronado Apartments and Hamilton House on the eastern edge of campus for $2.9 million, with the goal of demolishing them and converting the 2.5 acres (1.0 ha) of land they stood on into green space for the eastern side of campus.[224] In October and November 2008, the university demolished the Coronado Apartments with the goal of replacing it with a landscaped park and a trail as part of the City of Arlington's Center Street Pedestrian Trail.[225]

In August 2007, UTA opened the Smart Hospital, a nursing simulation facility with manikins able to simulate bleeding, breathing complications, and childbirth.[226] In September of that year, the university opened the Maverick Activities Center (MAC), its new campus recreation facility.[227] In April 2008, UTA installed the first green roof in the DFW Metroplex on the Life Science Building,[228] and in September 2008 the Engineering Research Complex became the first certified Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) building on the campus.[229] In November 2009, UTA announced that it would make its entire campus tobacco-free by August 2011.[230]

Greene Research Quad and the Engineering Research Building, 2021

In January 2011, UTA opened the new Engineering Research Building, which was constructed at the cost of $126 million.[231] In April, the university opened the College Park Green, a park in the College Park District on the eastern edge of campus.[232] In August of that year, UTA constructed a 35-foot (11 m) tower as a landmark building at the corner of UTA Boulevard and South Cooper Street. It was built with $481,666 left over from the construction of the Engineering Research Building.[233] In February 2012, UTA opened its new College Park Center as the home to its men's basketball, women's basketball, and women's volleyball teams as well as events.[82][234] In April 2012, the university purchased the Johnson Creek Crossing Apartments on South Pecan Street for $17.8 million, which it renamed The Heights on Pecan. The building provided UTA with approximately 300 more rooms for students living on campus.[235]

In spring 2018, UTA opened a new parking garage on the west side of its campus.[236] In July 2018, 82-year-old Brazos Hall, the smallest and oldest dormitory on campus, was demolished.[237][238] Brazos Park, situated on the former site of Brazos Hall,[239] was opened in August 2019.[240] In August 2018, The Commons, a new dining facility on west campus, and the new West Hall, a residence hall, were both opened.[241][242][243] In September 2018, UTA opened its new Science and Engineering Innovation and Research (SEIR) Building.[244][245] In February 2019, UTA acquired the Centennial Court apartments, which had previously been privately operated, and integrated them into its University Housing department.[246] In March 2019, the university opened its new Military and Veteran Services (MAVS) Center.[247]

In November 2019, the UT System Board of Regents allocated $60 million in funding for a new building for the UTA School of Social Work,[248] after President Karbhari addressed the 86th Texas Legislature in February about the dire state of the current Social Work building, which was built in 1922.[249] In 2019, UTA demolished its Maple Square and Garden Club apartments, both of which had been built in 1964 and had reached the end of their useful lives.[250] In December 2019, UTA demolished Trinity House, a residence hall on the west side of campus.[251] In September 2020, UTA opened its "grand entrance" addition on the University Center, the completion of a $9.8 million expansion project.[252]

Student life[edit]

See also: University of Texas at Arlington Rebel theme controversy

By the conclusion of the ASC era in 1967, there were 91 active student clubs and organizations on campus, more than four times more than in 1957.[15]

UTA was not a major center for student protest during the 1960s and 1970s, although it did witness smaller protests both for and against the Vietnam War, against the Middle Eastern policy of President Jimmy Carter, against the construction of the Comanche Peak Nuclear Power Plant in Glen Rose, and against those responsible for the Iran hostage crisis. The Ku Klux Klan also staged a protest on campus during a speech by Alex Haley.[57]

A dancer in costume during UTA's International Week, 1987

In September 1975, UTA hosted its largest-ever single event, an "Urban Survival Fair" that drew 65,000–70,000 attendees. Co-sponsored by UTA's Institute of Urban Studies and Dallas radio station KZEW, it featured live music in addition to 85 booths distributing information about art, education, and social service organizations.[253][254] UTA has celebrated International Week since 1977, which features the customs, dance, fashion, and food of thousands of UTA's international students.[255]

Since 1980, one of the most enduring traditions at UTA is bed racing, involving mounting wheels on bed frames with mattresses. The races are run at Maverick Stadium.[256][257] Since 1981, UTA has held an Activity Fair to welcome students to campus and connect them with leadership and volunteer opportunities.[258] In more recent years, the Activity Fair is held in conjunction with the Maverick Cookout, which features university faculty and staff serving burgers and drinks to students, as part of the larger Maverick Stampede series of events introducing students to campus and to fellow students.[259] Since 1989, students, faculty, staff, and alumni have competed annually in oozeball, a mud volleyball competition with proceeds helping to fund student scholarships.[260]

In 1985, UTA's practice of occasionally showing X-rated films on campus resulted in controversy when Baptist Student Union president Greg Sullivan protested the screening of the films Emmanuelle 2 and Story of O. State Senator Robert McFarland and Representative Jan McKenna, both representing Arlington, also expressed outrage over the practice and threatened withholding state funding to the university.[261] In response, President Nedderman developed a new policy that banned any X-rated films with "strong sexual content" from being screened on campus unless they were for a "legitimate academic or educational program".[262] While the resolution to the controversy was satisfactory to McFarland and McKenna, it was criticized as "an arbitrary kind of standard" by the Fort Worth chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union and disapproved by 87% of the student body, according to a poll conducted by The Shorthorn.[262]

After UTA's football program was terminated in 1985, homecoming moved from football season in the fall to the spring to better align with basketball season.[260] In 2012, homecoming returned to the fall.[260][263]

Beginning in 1989, every student in the engineering program at UTA was represented by their nation's flag hanging in Nedderman Hall.[213] In 2006, President James Spaniolo removed all 123 flags from the Hall of Flags after protests by the local Vietnamese American community following the inclusion of the flag of the extant Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Vietnam) and not the historic flag of the Republic of Vietnam (South Vietnam).[264][265] The decision ended the 17-year existence of the Hall of Flags,[265][266] and in an open forum in June 2006 Spaniolo declared that the flags would not return to Nedderman Hall in the foreseeable future.[266]

In February 1991, a pro-Operation Desert Storm rally was held on UTA's Library Mall after the beginning of the Gulf War.[267] In September 2005, the university declared Fridays to be "Spirit Days" and encouraged students, faculty, and staff to wear UTA apparel on those days.[268] In spring 2016, industrial and organizational psychology major Erin Porche started Natural Kinks, a natural hair club, on campus.[269]

In February 2018, UTA's chapter of Phi Gamma Delta was suspended for three years after an investigation, although no further details were provided.[270] In April 2019, UTA suspended all fraternity and sorority activities on campus due to "concerns regarding the culture of the fraternal community both at UTA and nationally".[271] President Karbarhari elaborated that the decision was made due to "cases of hazing, sexual assault, extreme intoxication, and other inappropriate behaviors connected to some members of our Greek Community".[272] In August 2019, UTA allowed fraternities and sororities to resume operation after each met new requirements mandated by the university, such as more training and limits on alcohol at events.[273]

Among the most notable guest speakers on campus in the UTA era were Jane Fonda in 1970 and vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro in 1984.[57][274][253] Pakistani prime minister Benazir Bhutto spoke on campus in 2007.[275] In 1975, country musician Willie Nelson played a benefit concert at UTA for its athletic department.[253]

Per campus lore, it is considered good luck to rub the head of the bronze bust of former president E. H. Hereford, which is on display in the Hereford University Center.[276] Another legend concerns a white elephant that is reputedly buried on the UTA campus. Former UTA professor John D. Boon explained that paleontology professor C. L. McNulty needed to create a collection of vertebrate skeletal elements. To accomplish this, UTA's biology and paleontology departments had bought the skeleton of an elephant named "Queen Tut", who lived and died at the Fort Worth Zoo, from the Fort Worth Rendering Company for $24. In order to clean the skeleton, it was buried in a parking lot near Maverick Stadium.[277] The skeleton was exhumed a few years later and added to the collections of UTA's Geology Department. A second elephant skeleton was similarly purchased by the university and cured on the roof of UTA's Science Building instead of being buried.[278]

Notable alumni[edit]

See also: List of University of Texas at Arlington people

In 1971, Tommy Franks graduated from UTA with a degree in business. After serving in the Vietnam War and the Gulf War, he rose to the rank of general before leading the American invasions of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2003.[279][280] In 1984, Kalpana Chawla graduated from UTA with a master's degree in aerospace engineering. In 1997, she became the first Indian woman to fly into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia,[38] and she was killed while flying on the Columbia again in 2003 when it disintegrated during reentry.[38][281] UTA subsequently named both a residence hall and a scholarship in her memory.[38][217] Actor Lou Diamond Philips also graduated from UTA in 1984.[282]

Athletics[edit]

ASC football player Mel Witt, one of the first African Americans on the team, 1966

After Memorial Stadium was demolished in 1972, the UTA football team was forced to play games on local high school fields until Maverick Stadium was opened in September 1980.[283] While it never recaptured the successes it achieved in the 1950s and generally struggled on the field while attracting often lackluster crowds, during the UTA era the football team won the Pecan Bowl in 1967 and won the Southland Conference (SLC) championship in 1981.[284]

In November 1985, President Nedderman announced the elimination of the football program, which was losing nearly $1 million per season.[262][284][285] In the words of Saxon, this was money that "could be used to further the university's primary mission of teaching and research, but instead was supporting a financially weak football program".[262] Another reason for the elimination of the football program was its sagging attendance, which declined from 7,950 per game in 1980, the first year at Maverick Stadium, to just 5,600 per game in 1985. The team had the poorest attendance of any school in the SLC, despite UTA having the largest total enrollment in the conference. A third reason was that the cost of football was drawing funding away from UTA's other athletics teams, making them less competitive. The decision to end the football program was opposed by UTA's Maverick Club athletic booster organization and community leaders such as Tom Cravens and Tom Vandergriff, and the resulting controversy even prompted Nedderman to refuse to talk to the press for two weeks after the initial announcement. Regardless, in the aftermath of his decision Nedderman received twice as many letters and calls voicing support for cutting football than those that were critical of his decision.[286]

Tim McKyer, who played on the final 1985 UTA football team, went on to win three Super Bowls with the San Francisco 49ers and the Denver Broncos.[287] UTA political science professor Allan Saxe summarized his perceptions of student attitudes toward eliminating the football team by stating "70 percent [of UTA students] would say they are not heartbroken over dropping football. 10 percent are heartbroken, and the remaining 20 percent did not know UTA even had a team."[288] UTA also eliminated its swimming program by the early 1980s.[1][289] As of 2015, UTA is the only college in the country with a marching band but no football team.[290]

Final men's basketball game at Texas Hall, view from the floor looking at the stage, 2012

Between 1965 and the opening of College Park Center in 2012, UTA's basketball and volleyball teams played at Texas Hall, a multipurpose auditorium built to hold concerts and theatrical plays in addition to athletics.[291][283] On February 1, 2012, the university opened College Park Center, the home to its men's basketball, women's basketball, and women's volleyball teams, with a basketball doubleheader against the University of Texas at San Antonio.[82][234][292][293] The arena has also hosted professional boxing[294][295] and professional wrestling since its opening.[296] After gaining approval from the UT System Board of Regents to lease the arena,[297] College Park Center became the new home arena of the Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA)'s Dallas Wings after the franchise relocated from Tulsa, Oklahoma, before their first season in Arlington in 2016.[298]

On July 1, 2012, UTA left the SLC and joined the Western Athletic Conference (WAC).[299][300] It remained in the WAC only for one year, leaving it to join the Sun Belt Conference (SBC) on July 1, 2013.[301]

In 1973, after the passage of Title IX of the 1972 Educational Amendments Act, UTA began sponsoring four women's sports: basketball, softball, track, and volleyball.[302] That was also the first year that women's athletics received a line item in the university budget.[58] During the 1980s, these four sports remained the four options for intercollegiate athletics for women at the university, while men's teams were fielded in baseball, basketball, golf, tennis, and track.[1] Cross country and tennis have subsequently been added as women's sports.[302] In 1990, The Dallas Morning News investigated the impact of cutting football on the remaining sports at UTA, finding that their competitiveness had improved after the demise of the football program. Conference championships were won by softball in 1988, men's track and field in 1988 and 1989, and women's volleyball in 1990. The volleyball team also went on a 54-game conference winning streak that was active through 1990.[54]

The men's basketball team qualified for the NCAA Division I tournament in 2008.[291] The 2007–08 team won the SLC championship for the first time in program history, winning a record 21 games in the process and qualifying for the NCAA tournament.[303] A #16 seed in the tournament, they were defeated by #1 seed Memphis, 87-63, in their first-ever NCAA tournament game.[304] The 2011–12 team won the SLC regular-season championship,[305] and the 2016–17 team won the SBC regular-season championship.[306]

The women's basketball team qualified for the NCAA Division I tournament in 2005 and 2007.[291][307] The 2004–05 women's basketball team qualified for the NCAA tournament for the first time in its history after winning the SLC title game against Louisiana–Monroe. Selected as a #13 seed in the tournament, they played their first-round game against #4 seed Texas Tech at Reunion Arena in Dallas, losing 69-49.[308] In 2006–07, the women's basketball team set a program record for wins in a season (24), went undefeated in SLC play, and made an appearance in the NCAA tournament, their second in three seasons.[309] In 2018–19, the women's basketball team won a regular-season SBC title.[310]

UTA Freewheelers wheelchair basketball player Abu Yilla and UTA volleyball player Judith McGill, 1985

The volleyball team advanced all the way to the Final Four in the 1989 NCAA Division I Women's Volleyball Tournament.[58][311] That team defeated the reigning national champion Texas Longhorns en route to the Final Four in Hawaii, where they lost to eventual national champions Long Beach State.[312] The UTA volleyball program has won SLC titles in 1982, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, and 1992.[58]

In 1990, the baseball team won its first conference championship, defeating Sam Houston State in the SLC title game.[313] It won another conference title in 1992.[314] In 1993, star player Clay Gould won the SLC Player of the Year award. In 1999, as head coach Butch McBroom retired after leading the team since 1974, Gould was named head coach at the age of just 27.[313][315] After being diagnosed with colon cancer in 2000, Gould continued to coach through the end of the season, but ultimately died from the disease in June 2001.[313][316] In April 2003, UTA's baseball field was renamed Clay Gould Ballpark in his memory.[313][317] In June 2004, UTA baseball player Hunter Pence was selected 64th overall in the 2004 Major League Baseball draft by the Houston Astros, making him the highest draft pick in UTA baseball history.[318] The 2006 team won the SLC tournament championship and qualified for the NCAA tournament,[319] and the 2012 team again won the SLC conference tournament,[320] qualifying it for that year's NCAA tournament.[321]

In 1986 and again in 1989, the softball team won SLC championships.[314]

In 1986 and 1991, the women's cross country team won conference championships.[58] The men's track and field team won outdoor conference championships in 1989, 1990, 1991, and 1992. It also won indoor conference championships in 1990, 1991, and 1992.[314] In October 2012, the UTA men's cross country team won the WAC championship.[322] In February 2014, the UTA men's track and field team won the indoor SBC title,[323] and in May 2014, it won the outdoor conference championship.[324] The team won the 2017 SBC Outdoor Track and Field Championships in May 2017,[325] and the SBC Indoor Championship in February 2019.[326] In November 2014, the UTA women's track and field team won the SBC conference championship.[327] In fall 2015, the UTA men's cross country team won the SBC conference title,[328] and it repeated as conference champions in fall 2016.[329] In June 2018, UTA high jumper Alexus Henry won an individual national championship at the NCAA Division I Outdoor Track and Field Championships.[330]

The women's tennis team has won six regular-season SLC titles, winning their last championship in 2011.[331] The men's tennis team won the SLC championship in 2010,[332] and the SBC championship in 2016.[333]

The men's golf team won the SLC championship in 2005,[334] and again in 2011.[335] In 2017, UTA established a women's golf program.[336][337]

Established in 1976, the Movin' Mavs men's wheelchair basketball team has won nine national titles, the most recent in 2021.[338][339] The team was founded by UTA alumnus Jim Hayes as the Freewheelers in 1976, and in 1988 they joined the National Wheelchair Basketball Association and changed their name to the Movin' Mavs.[339] After they won their third consecutive national championship in 1993, they were invited to the White House by President Bill Clinton.[314][340] In 2002, the Movn' Mavs became the first ever college team to make the semifinals of the professional-division National Wheelchair Basketball Tournament.[341] In October 2009, James Patin of the Movin' Mavs wheelchair tennis team won a national championship,[342] and in October 2014, the UTA wheelchair tennis team won the ITA/USTA Intercollegiate Wheelchair Tennis National Team Championships.[343] In fall 2013, UTA established a women's wheelchair basketball team, commonly known as the Lady Movin' Mavs.[344] In March 2016, they won their first NWBA National Intercollegiate Wheelchair Basketball Tournament,[345] and in March 2018, they won their second national championship.[346] Five members or alumni of the Movin' Mavs and Lady Movin' Mavs competed in wheelchair basketball at the 2016 Summer Paralympics: Abby Dunkin, Aaron Gouge, Rose Hollermann, Mike Paye, and Jorge Sanchez.[347][348]

The UTA cheer squad has won national championships in its division in 2010,[349] 2014,[350] 2015,[351] 2016,[352] 2017,[353] and 2018.[354]

In 1982, UTA mechanical engineering professor Robert Woods created a Formula SAE team that designs and builds a race car for competition every year. The UTA Formula SAE team has won both national and international competitions, and in 2014 it was ranked fifth in the world.[339] In September 2004, the team won its first-ever international competition against 26 other cars in Japan.[355] In September 2015, it won the Sports Car Club of America Nationals.[356]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzaaHamlett, Samuel B. (June 15, 2010). "University of Texas at Arlington". Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association. Retrieved June 2, 2020.
  2. ^"Texas A&M Thanked by ASC Chief". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. April 22, 1965. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.comFree to read.
  3. ^Saxon 1995, p. 103
  4. ^ abcdeSaxon 1995, p. 89
  5. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, pp. 119–121
  6. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 99
  7. ^ abcBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 53
  8. ^Sharp, Justin (January 19, 2010). "UTA's first black graduate gives keynote speech". The Shorthorn. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  9. ^Coit, Taylor (August 24, 2021). "UTA's first Black graduate remembered for his kindness, wisdom". The Shorthorn. Retrieved August 26, 2021.
  10. ^McGee, Patrick (February 19, 2004). "UTA's first black graduate to be honored". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  11. ^Saxon 1995, p. 92
  12. ^Saxon 1995, p. 90
  13. ^ ab"Masters for ASC Approved". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. July 19, 1966. Retrieved May 30, 2020 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  14. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 47
  15. ^ abcdSaxon 1995, p. 100
  16. ^"ASC Students Get Fraternal Units OK". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. October 21, 1966. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  17. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 107
  18. ^Burnett, Destiny (August 30, 2017). "Fraternity and Sorority Life celebrates 50 years on campus". The Shorthorn. Retrieved October 6, 2021.
  19. ^Saxon 1995, p. 101
  20. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 55
  21. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 107
  22. ^"Expanding Campus, Curricula Will Keep Pace With Needs". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. December 10, 1967. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  23. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 125
  24. ^ abBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 50
  25. ^Hand, Martha (April 26, 1968). "UTA President, Woolf, Resigns". Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  26. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 108
  27. ^Saxon 1995, p. 91
  28. ^ abcdeSaxon 1995, p. 119
  29. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 109
  30. ^ abSaxon 1995, p. 110
  31. ^ abcSaxon 1995, p. 111
  32. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 118
  33. ^ abcdBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 120
  34. ^ abBarker & Worcester 2015, p. 122
  35. ^Barker & Worcester 2015, p. 44
  36. ^"Negro educator accepts UTA teaching, counseling posts". Grand Prairie Daily News. August 1, 1969. Retrieved November 15, 2021 – via Newspapers.com Free to read.
  37. ^Saxon 1995, pp. 110–111
  38. ^ ab
Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_University_of_Texas_at_Arlington_(1965%E2%80%93present)

 

B. 1984, Waco, TX
Currently lives in Dallas, TX.

 
Education

Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), Providence, RI
MFA Sculpture 2012

The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
BFA Studio Art  2007

Solo and Two Person Exhibitions
Squeeze, Tweeze, Please, MAD Arts, Dania Beach, FL. 2021
The Philosophy of Goo, in collaboration with Trey Burns, Wassaic Projects, Wassaic, NY, 2020
How to fold a fitted sheet, ex ovo, Dallas, TX. 2020
Nasher Windows Series, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX. 2020
Picnic, Maria Hernandez Park, in conjunction with NYC Parks & Rec, Brooklyn, NY 2018
Bold Notion, The CORE: CLUB, New York, NY. 2018
No Your Boundaries, CUE Art Foundation, NY, NY. 2016
An Interior Complex, Sunroom Project Space at Wave Hill, Bronx, NY. 2015
Backyard Pool, @ The Lot in conjunction with Socrates Sculpture Park and Rockrose Development Corp., Long Island City, NY. 2014
Open to the Public, Rooster Gallery Contemporary Art: THE BATHROOM Project Space, NY, NY. 2014
Immaterial Labor, Callicarpa Gallery, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX. 2012


Selected Group Exhibitions
(UUU) Unbounded Unleashed Unforgiving: Reconsidering Cyberfeminism in 2021, Virtual exhibitionon New Art City hosted by College Art Association and
the New Media Caucus, 2021
Continuum,Carillon Gallery at Tarrant County College South, Ft Worth, TX. 2020
The Big T-Shirt Show, ex ovo Gallery, Dallas, TX. 2019
2019 Tuesday Evenings at the Modern: Films
, Ft Worth Modern Museum, Ft. Worth, TX. 2019
You’re Invited! Spring Break Art Show 2019,
New York, NY, 2019
Word/Play - SoundSpace,
The Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX, 2019
Shady Acres,
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, SLC, UT, 2019
Summer Lovin'
, Air Mattress Gallery, New York, NY, 2018
81: the shape of things to come, LatchKey Gallery, New York, NY, 2018
Call and Response, Wave Hill, Bronx, NY, 2017
SPRING BREAK Art Show, Fata Morgana, 4 Times Square, New York, NY, 2017
12 x 12, 2016, Black Ball Projects, Brooklyn, NY. 2016
GOING HARD: Digbeth First Friday Film Screenings, Grand Union Gallery, Birmingham, UK. 2016
U.K Performance Festival, Green River Project Room, Hillsdale, NY. 2016
12x12x12 Exhibition, Black Ball Project, Brooklyn, NY. 2015
SURPH, The Barn Show, East Hampton, NY. 2015
It’s Not What You Think, Philip Bloom Gallery, Nantucket, MA. 2015
SYMBOLIC SYMBIOTIC, Peridot Green quarterly salon hosted by American Cyborg, New York, NY. 2015
Positioning Systems, Microscope Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. 2015
Immediate Female, Judith Charles Gallery, New York, NY. 2015                     
INFLUX 2014 pt. 1, CR10 Arts, Hudson, NY. 2014
GRAVITY, Projekt 722, Brooklyn, NY. 2014
SUN SCREENING vol. I, Videology, Brooklyn, NY. 2014
PATHWAYS: PAST/PRESENT, Moran Plant in conjunction with Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT. 2014
I Try, and I Try, and I Try, Find & Form Space, Boston, MA. 2014
Fluid, Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, Staten Island, NY. 2014
DALLAS BIENNIAL DB14, Eastfield College Gallery, Dallas, TX. 2014
A Public Pool, EAF 13: Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition, Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY. 2013
VIDEOROVER: Season 7, NURTUREart Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
THIRTEEN TWENTY THREE EXHIBITION, 964 Dean St. Space, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
Bad Film Fest, NYC Comedy Bar, New York, NY. 2013
AUNTS TIME SHARE: CURATION CHAIN 4, Arts @ Renaissance, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
Spring Fever, 594 LOFT Gallery, Bushwick, NY. 2013
Game On, Spoke Gallery @ Medicine Wheel Productions, Boston, MA. 2013
State of the ART 2012, Chase Young Gallery, Boston, MA. 2012
Arrive Wherever You Can, Rooster Gallery Contemporary Art, New York, NY. 2012
INCIDENTAL

Tallahassee Community College Calendar 2019

Avoid-Things To Win A Scholarship Of Your Dreams

Do you know that applying for most scholarship programs takes nearly as much time as working full-time? It hurts a lot more if you fail when working from morning to evening and yet manage to submit your documents in a while. Today I'm going to tell you about the 10 Things You Shouldn't Do If You Want to Win a Scholarship. Just keep the following at every stage when you are going to apply for the scholarship. These can be: 1. Don't anticipate immediate results 2. Never give up on yourself 3. Avoid dwelling on the past 4. Don't concentrate on your errors 5. Do not be afraid of the future 6. Don't give up too quickly 7. Don't think of yourself as a wimp 8. Don't expect to be rewarded by the world 9. Don't let your ambition to achieve be overshadowed by your fear of failing 10. Never underestimate your ability Let's get this party started! 1. Don't anticipate immediate results You were under the impression that you had applied for a scholarship program today and would get an e-mail in a month alerting you that you had been chosen. However, unless you have beginner's luck, this is seldom the case. When applying for scholarships, consider at least 5 or 6 programs. You will be able to use it for all of them if you have more patience and spare time. You'll get at least one of them. 2. Never give up on yourself When looking for scholarships, if you discover that few scholarship programs fit your educational, career, and future aspirations, don't close up. Don't be surprised if programs need professional essays, reference letters, and advanced qualifications such as IELTS Vs TOEFL, GRE, GMAT, SAT, etc. Take your time, organize your days, and educate yourself. Look for academic help. Make use of the internet's resources. 3. Avoid dwelling on the past Don't focus on previous failures in school, college, university, profession, or even your girlfriend or boyfriend's relationship. Try not to think that if you've failed many times before, you'll never succeed again. Your history does not have any bearing on your future. Take charge of it, at the very least. The past is, well, the past. It is no longer there. You do not influence the circumstance. If you have offended someone, ask God to forgive you and go on your way. 4. Don't concentrate on your errors Don't you say to yourself, "That's it!" when you finally apply for a scholarship program and get turned down? I've made it.” Accept your failure, learn from it, and work to improve your weak points. 5. Do not be afraid of the future Consider yourself in a leadership position, operating your firm or projects and assembling a team with whom you wish to grow in the future. Forget about a full-time office job with a consistent wage and a "nice" boss. Develop your sense of identity, vision, and leadership. 6. Don't give up too quickly Allow me to share some details with you. Because so many of your friends are studying abroad, don't apply for scholarships. To put it another way, think about how foreign education may help you and your country in the future. This will help you fight the urge to give up and wait for someone to push you forward. 7. Don't think of yourself as a wimp Avoid thinking of yourself as a failure because you have poor grades in high school or college. The truth is that grades do not define you as a person. I'll give you an example. I was never a good student, and most of my steps were poor at best. However, I was always more concerned with my abilities and knowledge than with my grades. I have, nevertheless, done a great lot in my life. 8. Don't expect to be rewarded by the world Assume you're a straight student. And you think that one day, a miracle will occur, and your life will be forever transformed. You may tell yourself, "I'm doing so well in school; someone must be paying attention to me." He/she will be grateful for my efforts.” However, this will not happen unless you take the initiative and try to sell your capabilities. 9. Don't let your ambition to achieve be overshadowed by your fear of failing Never say anything like, "What if I don't pass?" Alternatively, "What if I don't pass?" What if too much of a good thing is bad? What if I fail my language or other examinations later on? What if I can't study at X University?” The list could go on and on. Be more positive. What if God wants you to make a change in your life? Consider it like this: Have enthusiasm as well. I'm confident you'll be successful if you dream, dream, dream of success. 10. Never underestimate your ability Please don't be ignored when it comes to reaching your full potential. You have the power to do excellent, unique, and mind-boggling things. You have no idea what sort of potential you have since your teachers mainly assessed you simply on your academic performance. As a result, you think you know very little. Pay close attention! Nobody knows you better than yourself. For example, I'm a blogger. I have my blog and contribute to We Make Scholars. I'm not supposed to be here writing this based on my school grades. Summary These above-mentioned steps or measures can save the scholarship of your dreams. Let's start to get your dream scholarship now. Hope our article will be useful for you to make your dream come true.

Read More
Источник: https://www.listscholarship.com/tallahassee-community-college-calendar-2019
Progress.................................................10

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2019 News Releases

Path to graduation included years on Death Row

12/10/19

Ryan Matthews was just 17 years old when he was arrested for murder. Two years later, a Louisiana jury sentenced him to death row. He’d spend five years there before DNA evidence cleared him of the crime.

Now, he’s set to receive his bachelor of applied arts and sciences degree from Texas Woman’s University during the 9 a.m. commencement ceremony Saturday, Dec. 14, in Pioneer Hall.

Study shows benefits of Spanish-language literacy program

12/5/19

Citing the growing number of Latino English learners and the lack of evidence-based educational opportunities they are provided, evaluators with the American Institutes of Research (AIR) teamed with the Texas Woman’s University Reading Recovery program for a randomized controlled study of Descubriendo la Lectura (DLL), a literacy program for bilingual first-graders who are having difficulty learning to read and write in their native Spanish.

Project aims to produce more Hispanic teachers

12/3/19

Texas Woman’s University will use a $500,000 federal grant to recruit and educate more Hispanics as teachers to address teacher shortages in the state. The university is partnering with Tarrant County College District and other community colleges to create a path for teacher candidates to transfer from a two-year school to complete their bachelor’s degree at TWU.

TWU team tackles astronaut shoulder injuries in NASA competition

11/19/19

Texas Woman’s University sends its third team of senior undergraduate kinesiology students to the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase in Houston this week. They will compete against engineering and technology teams from universities across the state who are working to solve research problems identified by NASA. TWU’s Good Vibrations will be the only team to have a project focused on the human aspect of space travel.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Dec. 7, 2019

11/18/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 8 a.m. - 12:00 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 7 on the university’s Denton campus.

Gates selected for Virginia Chandler Dykes Award

11/18/19

Dallas City Councilmember Jennifer Staubach Gates has been named the recipient of the 18th Annual Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award, presented by Bank of Texas, Texas Woman’s University and the Texas Woman’s University Foundation.

Texas Woman’s Chancellor Carine M. Feyten will honor Councilmember Gates on Feb. 20, 2020 at the Dallas Leadership Luncheon chaired by Ralph Hawkins, chairman emeritus with HKS, Inc. and recipient of the 2015 Virginia Chandler Dykes Leadership Award.

TWU named Best for Vets: Colleges 2020

11/8/19

Texas Woman’s University has been named one of the best colleges for veterans, coming in at No. 47 in the nation, according to Military Times.

TWU Theatre presents ‘The Architecture of Loss’

11/6/19

The Texas Woman’s University Theatre Program continues its 2019-2020 season with the world premiere of “The Architecture of Loss” Nov. 20-24. The production will integrate elements theatre, dance and music to explore and express feelings of loss, grief and healing in the aftermath of death.

Chemistry educator honored with 2019 Chancellor's Alumni Excellence Award

10/18/19

Texas Woman’s University alumna and internationally recognized chemist E. Ann Nalley, Ph.D., has been named the 2019 recipient of the TWU Chancellor’s Alumni Excellence Award. Throughout her career of more than 50 years, Nalley, the Clarence L. Page Endowed Chair of Mathematics and Science Education at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma, has worked to advance the visibility of women in the traditionally male-dominated chemistry field.

TWU to host Pioneer Research at the Mall Nov. 2

10/16/19

Texas Woman’s University faculty and students will present their research to the public 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, in the Golden Triangle Mall food court. Pioneer Research at the Mall is an annual event designed to engage the Denton community in discussions about current and upcoming research projects taking place at TWU.

To the Top of the World and Back

10/15/19

TWU alumna Roxanne Vogel has taken mountain climbing to new heights. 

An experienced mountaineer who’s climbed the tallest mountains on nearly all the continents, Vogel set a unique goal for herself to become the first person to scale Mt. Everest – going up from sea level, to the top of the world and back down – in a record-making two weeks. By comparison, the average climber takes two months to climb the world’s tallest peak.

Alumna's 'Unique' program wins national award

10/2/19

Texas Woman's alumna Christina Buce was in her first year as an elementary school counselor when her principal challenged her to “get creative” with the school’s awareness days — those days focusing attention on key health issues. Buce’s response not only captured the hearts and minds of the school community, but won a national award as a What is navy working capital fund Promising Practice as well. 

TWU Theatre presents ‘Macbeth’

10/6/19

The Texas Woman’s University Theatre Program opens its 2019-2020 season with William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth.” Directed by associate professor Steven Young, “Macbeth” tells the tragic tale of a warrior who receives a prophecy that he will become the king of Scotland.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Oct. 19, 2019

9/30/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 19 on the university’s Denton campus.

TWU alumna Merrilee Kick turns class project into multi-million-dollar business

11/5/19

In 2009, Merrilee Kick was a high school teacher enrolled in TWU’s Executive MBA program wanting to make more money to support her family. Things were tough, and she needed a great business plan both for her capstone project and her future. What she got was the inspiration and drive that would completely change her life.

Villavaso lands Fullbright grant, strives to fight for human rights

9/24/19

Recent graduate Morgan Villavaso chose to attend TWU because she was inspired by its purpose and mission, which is “rooted in the truth that educating women empowers the world.” She chose to study sociology because of its humanitarian focus. “Sociology taught me to move through the world with a conscientious and critical lens,” said Villavaso.

TWU reports record enrollment for fall 2019

9/18/19

Student enrollment at Texas Woman’s University reached a record 15,846 for fall 2019, a 2% increase over the previous year, according to preliminary figures announced today by the university.

Opportunity is key to bilingual ed path for Hoyos

9/17/19

A college professor could write a lengthy dissertation on the importance of sharpening Spanish and English skills in schoolchildren, but Jessica Hoyos can sum up her position in short order: “I want young people to think of Spanish as a strength, not a weakness.”

So it shouldn’t surprise anyone that Hoyos, a Texas Woman’s University senior interdisciplinary studies major with a concentration in bilingual education, is passionate about becoming a teacher.

TWU to host Graduate School and Professional Fair Sept. 17, 2019

9/3/19

Texas Woman’s University will host a Graduate School and Professional Fair from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday, Sept. 17, in Pioneer Hall located on Bell Avenue in Denton. For a map of the Denton campus, visit TWU maps. Free visitor parking with shuttle service is available at the Denton Bible Church.

TWU Regents approve construction for sports facility

8/9/19

On Aug. 9, the Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents authorized construction of an $11.5 million sports building to support the university’s existing soccer, softball and intramural programs as well as future competitive sports.

Texas Woman's launches biliteracy certificate program

8/1/19

This fall, Texas Woman’s University launches a new graduate certificate in biliteracy, the only one of its kind in the state. Educators can earn the certificate with the option of applying the credits toward a master’s degree in reading education.

Pioneer Pride dance team claims bragging rights

7/31/19

The Texas Woman’s University Pioneer Pride dance team placed first in Division II schools during the National Dance Team Camp held in Dallas on the SMU campus July 20-22, beating out DBU, Tarleton and Angelo State.  

Texas Woman’s STEM project awarded $1 million grant

7/9/19

The National Science Foundation has awarded Texas Woman’s University a five-year, $999,794 grant to support scholarships and projects aimed at increasing the number of students and graduates in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields.

TWU lists Spring 2019 graduates

6/21/19

Texas Woman’s University held Spring 2019 commencement ceremonies May 10-12. Graduates are listed according to their hometowns. Students from areas other than Texas are seaside rentals obx alphabetically by state or country.

TWU dental hygiene students, faculty provide services in Peru

6/19/19

For the past three years, TWU dental hygiene clinical professor Leslie Koberna and her students have ventured to Guatemala, working in make-shift facilities and mobile dental units to treat and clean the teeth of orphans, school children and families who might not get these services elsewhere. Last month, Koberna took her students 2,000 miles further south to provide dental hygiene services to nearly 300 people in Lima, Peru, during an 11-day faculty-led education abroad experience.

TWU student wins national advising research award

6/19/19

Texas Woman’s University doctoral candidate Elia S. Tamplin has received the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA) Student Research Award for their presentation, "Research on Women-of-Color Professional Experiences in Higher Education." Tamplin will be recognized with a plaque and a one-year membership at NACADA’s annual conference in Louisville, Bangor home depot hours October 20-23.

Texas Woman’s doctoral student named 2019-20 Schweitzer Fellow

6/17/19

Morgan Grant, a Texas Woman’s University health promotion and kinesiology Ph.D. student from Valdosta, Georgia, will spend the next year creating a sexual health empowerment and education program through a prestigious Dallas-Fort Worth Albert Schweitzer Fellowship. Grant, who earned his MBA from TWU in 2017 and recently became certified as a health education specialist, will work with a community agency to address HIV/STD prevention for minority and at-risk populations who identify as a member of the LGBTQIA community in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

TWU program assesses firefighters' health, wellness

6/13/19

For more than 20 years, Texas Woman’s University’s Institute for Women’s Health has offered wellness programs and performed health research. This year, a group of first responders— firefighters in the Denton Fire Department (DFD)—is taking advantage of the services available in the clinic. Denton firefighters can earn bonus pay for maintaining or improving specified wellness levels. To help them monitor these levels, the DFD signed a three-year agreement with TWU’s Institute for Women’s Health to assess the health and fitness of the department’s 170 firefighters annually.

TWU alumna Nitashia Johnson wins Sony Creator-in-Residence Award

6/13/19

Texas Woman’s University alumna Nitashia Johnson recently completed her residency in the 2019 Sony Alpha Female Creator-in-Residence Award Program, which included $25,000 in grant money, $5,000 in film and photography gear as well as mentorship, networking, exhibition and educational opportunities.

TWU releases Spring 2019 deans', chancellor's lists

6/13/19

Texas Woman's University has released its deans' and chancellor's lists for the Spring 2019 semester.

Undergraduate students who complete at least 12 graded credit hours and achieve at least a 3.5 grade point average are eligible for the deans' list. Students who have achieved a 4.0 GPA are named to the chancellor's list.

TWU taps national nursing leader as new dean

5/29/19

Texas Woman’s University today announced that Rosalie Mainous, a former collegiate dean, NIH-funded researcher, and the current director of academic nursing development for the American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN), will become dean of TWU’s College of Nursing, effective Aug. 5.

D'Abrosca tapped to be next TWU student regent

5/24/19

Texas Woman’s University junior Lexi D’Abrosca has been appointed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott to serve as the next student representative on the Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents. Her term expires May 31, 2020.

Capstone project yields success for students, health providers

5/23/19

As one of the largest public hospital systems in the country, Parkland Health & Hospital System handles more than 1 million outpatient visits a year and it fiscal year 2018 it provided more than $1.02 billion in uncompensated care.

The safety-net hospital and the 20 community clinics it operates rely heavily on funding from Medicare and Medicaid, charities and property taxes to sustain its operations. Adequate revenue sources are crucial to the operation of the 125-year-old Parkland system.

With that as a backdrop, two teams of Texas Woman’s University Health Systems Management tarrant county college spring break 2015 this year embarked on a plan to help boost Parkland’s bottom line.

TWU Board of Regents approves promotions and tenure

5/23/19

The Texas Woman’s University Board of Regents approved promotions and tenure recommendations at its quarterly meeting May 17 at the TWU T. Boone Pickens Institute of Health Sciences-Dallas Center. Regents also awarded emeritus status to retiring faculty and staff.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day June 8, 2019

5/21/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year and transfer students — from 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m., Saturday, June 8 on the university’s Denton campus.

TWU to conduct Spring 2019 Commencement

5/6/19

The Spring 2019 semester at Texas Woman’s University will draw to a close with commencement ceremonies scheduled Friday and Saturday, May 10-11 on TWU’s Denton campus, and Sunday, May 12 in Houston.

Graduation ceremony recognizes family members’ tarrant county college spring break 2015 wasn’t your typical pomp and circumstance.

Roughly 70 soon-to-be-graduates at Texas Woman’s University took part in a special ceremony Saturday tarrant county college spring break 2015 honor their children and other family members for their support during the students’ journey through college.

Governor Abbott appoints four to TWU Board of Regents

4/24/19

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has appointed Carlos Gallardo to the Texas Woman's University Board of Regents for a term set to expire on February 1, 2021. Additionally, the Governor appointed Robert “Bob” Hyde and Stacie McDavid and reappointed Mary Pincoffs Wilson for terms set to expire on February 1, 2025.

TWU students design garment to help astronauts fight back pain

4/19/19

A group of Texas Woman's University kinesiology seniors, known as the Acolytes of Apollo, have been working this semester on a special garment designed to reduce lower back pain experienced by astronauts in microgravity. The team presented their project at the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase on April 15, and placed fourth out of 14 teams at this semiannual competition sponsored by NASA.

TWU Athletics Director to lead new Pioneer MoneyWise Center

4/16/19

Texas Woman's University officials today announced the creation of a new center to help students manage their finances and have appointed Chalese Connors to lead the strategic effort. Connors has served the university for more than two decades, including the past 18 years as director of athletics. In her new role, she will be charged with building a center that will educate students about financial literacy and student loan debt.

TWU herbarium director receives conservation award

4/15/19

Texas Woman’s University biology professor and herbarium director, Camelia Maier, Ph.D., received the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution (NSDAR) Conservation Medal at the 120th Annual State Conference of the Texas Society Daughters of the American Revolution. In addition to the medal, Maier received a certificate from Texas State Regent Susan Tillman at the awards dinner in Houston in March.

TWU hosts Autism Awareness night at Frisco RoughRiders ballpark

4/12/19

Texas Woman's University faculty and students hit a home run in early April when they managed an Autism Awareness Night for children and their families tarrant county college spring break 2015 a Frisco RoughRiders baseball game. According to Gwen Weatherford, director of TWU's sport management program, the baseball team specifically requested support from TWU. Twenty TWU occupational therapy students and faculty members managed the event, with hosting support from TWU students in sport management and kinesiology

TWU to dedicate math and technology success center in honor of Don Edwards, Ph.D.

4/11/19

Texas Woman’s University will rename its math tutoring center in honor of retiring TWU Department of Mathematics and Computer Science professor and chair, Don Edwards, Ph.D. The “Dr. Don Edwards Mathematics & Technology Success Center” dedication ceremony will take place during a retirement reception at 3 p.m. Tuesday, Apr. 23 on the third floor of the Multipurpose Classroom and Laboratory Building.

TWU returns to NASA design challenge

4/10/19

Texas Woman's University's Acolytes of Apollo wowed everyone last November when they won top honors at the Texas Space Grant Consortium Design Challenge Showcase, competing against engineering and technology teams from universities across the state. Another TWU Acolytes team hopes to do the same next week when they show an improvement to the design developed last year.

Phi Kappa Phi chapter earns top honors

4/3/19

The Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi — the nation’s oldest and most selective collegiate honor society for all academic disciplines — recently recognized the Texas Woman's University chapter of Phi Kappa Phi as a Circle of Excellence Platinum Chapter, the highest commendation a chapter can receive from the organization.

TWU student to present undergraduate research at Capitol

3/26/19

Texas Woman’s University biology senior Hanna McDonald will be among a select group of undergraduate researchers from across the state presenting their work at the Undergraduate Research Day at the Texas Capitol in Austin on April 1.

TWU grad draws from personal success to inspire others

3/19/19

She graduated first in her class at Lake Worth High School and had a penchant for math, so it seemed like a good bet that Adriana Blanco would earn a degree in that discipline at Texas Woman’s University and then teach.

TWU Theatre presents ‘Cabaret’

3/19/19

 The Texas Security first insurance colorado University Theatre Program will conclude its 2018-2019 season with the Tony Award-winning musical Cabaret, written by Joe Masteroff, John Kander and Fred Ebb. The show will run April 4-7 and 11-13.

TWU presents ArtsWalk: Learning the Land April 4

3/18/19

The Texas Woman’s University School of the Arts invites area residents to join students, faculty and staff for ArtsWalk: Learning the Land. Event participants will interact with works by artist and designer Molly Sherman and explore sites on TWU’s Denton campus and surrounding areas. This free, all-ages event will be held from 5:15 to 8 p.m. Thursday, April 4.

Register now for TWU summer camps

3/14/19

Looking for educational and fun activities for your children this summer? Texas Woman's University provides a variety of camps for local children of all ages. Dance and theatre, writing, science and technology, sports and speech round out the offerings on the university's Denton campus.

TWU Jamison Lecture to feature US Congresswomen Sylvia Garcia and Kay Granger

3/11/19

U.S. Congresswomen Sylvia Garcia and Kay Granger will speak at Texas Woman’s University’s fourth annual Jamison Lecture, beginning at 7 p.m., March 21 on the university’s Denton campus. The lecture, titled “Women on the Rise: Reflections on the 2018 Election,” will take place in Margo Jones Performance Hall on Pioneer Circle. The lecture is free and open to the public.

Ferguson embarks on third Alternative Spring Break volunteer trip

3/12/19

While most cal south state cup lancaster are on vacation or enjoying a relaxing break from school, Shiley Ferguson donates her time to others through Alternative Spring Break (ASB) volunteer programs. Ferguson has already participated in two ASB trips and will embark on her third and final trip this year before graduating with a nursing degree in May.

Student, Mom, Employee, Superhero, Nataleigh Ritchey

2/27/19

Just two weeks before graduating from Collinsville High School in Collinsville, Texas, Nataleigh Ritchey received shocking news. She was pregnant.

Many high school graduates look forward to college and career aspirations. Facing her future, she realized it would look a little different for her now. Nevertheless, Nataleigh was determined to accomplish her degree.

TWU breaks ground on science and research center

2/22/19

Texas Woman's University officials today broke ground on a new science and research center that will add critical research space and enhance efforts to increase research activities at the institution.

2019 Edible Car Contest winners announced

2/11/19

Texas Woman’s University hosted its 21st annual Edible Car Contest Friday, Feb. 8. The contest challenged Dallas-Fort Worth area grade school students to combine their creative ideas with principles of mathematics and physics.

Sager designs official tartan, makes university history

1/29/19

From volunteering at the Texas Fashion Collection, designing and modeling in many TWU fashion shows, participating in the Alpha Alpha Chapter of the Phi Upsilon Omicron Honor Society and practicing Irish Step Dancing, Sager had a busy schedule. Then she designed Texas Woman’s official tartan.

New Graduate and Nigerian American, Alexander Adegbembo

1/28/19

Alexander Adegbembo and his family, having arrived in the US in early 2011, are a picturesque example of the opportunity and life-changing fortune of a new life in the United States as immigrants.

“My case is like winning the lottery,” he said. Quite literally.

TWU Department of Public Safety earns accreditation

1/28/19

The Texas Woman’s University Department of Public Safety has joined the ranks of only 1.5 percent of university police departments to achieve accreditation by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators, the leading authority for campus public safety.

Doctoral family therapy program earns national accreditation

1/24/19

The family therapy doctoral program at Texas Woman’s University recently received national accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE), becoming only the third doctoral program in Texas accredited by the agency, and the only one in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Jones leads gymnastics team in back-to-back national championships

1/22/19

Passion and focus helped Schyler Jones lead the TWU gymnastics team to back-to-back national championships in 2017 and 2018. Chances are pretty good those two personality traits will play a major role as she pursues a longtime dream of becoming a teacher.

Music and dance centers offer supportive environments for lifelong education

1/15/19

Texas Woman’s University invites children, buy amazon gift card with chase pay and adults to register for Spring 2019 Community Music and Community Dance Center lessons. Classes are taught by faculty members or graduate students at TWU’s Denton campus and include introductory, intermediate and advanced courses, culminating in a recital performed for an audience of friends and family.

TWU taps veteran lawyer for general counsel post

1/14/19

Texas Woman’s University has hired Katherine Antwi Green, a lawyer with 25 years of legal experience in government and higher education, as its next general counsel and associate vice president for compliance.

TWU to host Pioneer Preview Day Feb. 2, 2019

1/14/19

Texas Woman’s University will host Pioneer Preview Day — an open house event for potential first-year students — from 8 a.m. - 12:15 p.m., Saturday, Feb. 2 on tarrant county college spring break 2015 university’s Denton campus.

TWU 2019 Parry Lecture to Focus on Indigenizing Health Professions

1/11/19

Texas Woman’s University College of Nursing in Houston will host the annual Parry Distinguished Lectureship Thursday, March 7, from 5-7 pm, at the Houston campus in the Texas Medical Center. Margaret Moss, Ph.D., JD, RN, FAAN, Director of the First Nations House of Learning and nursing faculty member at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver Campus, will present “Indigenizing the Health Professions,” with a focus on health care for Native Americans and Alaska natives.

Wife, Mother, Student, La Toya Hart

1/14/19

When La Toya Hart—a Sherman, Texas, native—decided she wanted to get her college degree, she knew there was only one place she wanted to attend: Texas Woman’s University.

A wife of 17 years and mother of two sons, La Toya had been an early childhood educator and once her youngest received a diagnosis of ADHD, they made the decision to have her stay home and homeschool him while running an in-home daycare.

Sterling Stinson, Student entrepreneur

1/10/19

Sterling Stinson, a junior from Ponder, Texas, would likely agree with the old adage, “Variety is the spice of life.” Not one to shy away from a challenge or new experience, Sterling has been sure to rack up as many rich and diverse experiences while at TWU as she can.

Page last updated 4:53 PM, October 7, 2021 

Источник: https://twu.edu/news-events/news/archive/2019-news-releases/
Access.2

Annual Report Other, Curbs & Stoops and Rhythmology Pop-Up Exhibition, September 22- Nov 3. 2012
SHOW ME YOUR GLANDS, Curated Exhibition, NARS Foundation, Brooklyn, Bank of america gurgaon contact number. 2012
GRADUATE SELECTION Exhibition, Curated exhibition, Chace Center at the RISD Museum, Providence, RI. 2011
ON VIEW: Tarrant county college spring break 2015 PERFORMANCE EXHIBITION, Curated three-part exhibition, Gelman Gallery, Providence, RI. 2011
On the Threshold of Something Else, Something Other., Curated Exhibition, Sol Koffler Gallery, Providence, RI. 2011


Selected Press
Avram, Danielle, In a west Dallas gallery, artist Tamara Johnson harnesses the power of goo, Dallas Morning News, October 17, 2020.
Rockefeller, Hal, Women of Texas, Less Than Half, July 27, 2020
Modern Art Notes Podcast, No. 446: John Edmonds, Tamara Johnson, May 21, 2020
Ratcliff, Darryl, West Dallas sculpture park provides oasis in a rapidly changing neighborhood, Dallas Morning News, Jun 19, buy cash app gift card, Natalie, The Nasher Wants You to Visit Its Www california bank and trust, D Magazine, May 22, 2020
Fisher, Alyssa, A Semi-Permanent Picnic in the Park, Bushwick Daily, August 23, 2018.
Harding, Kate, Tamara Johnson No Your Boundaries, The Brooklyn Rail, April 6, 2016
Roffino, Sara, About Armadillos and Other Topics, CUE Art Foundation “No Your Boundaries” Catalogue, 2016
Greig, Laura, The Half-Hidden Garden, Excelsior! Blog, May 4, 2015    
Kendall, Harry, Listen up: See art and architecture in dialogue this fall, Crain’s 5boros, Oct 30, 2014
Frey, David Andrew, New Artist Feature Fall 2014, CULTUREHALL, Oct 8 2014
Zweig, Janet, Tamara Johnson’s Waterless Pools, Public Art Review Featured, Oct 1 2014
Solomon, Deborah, No work better captures this summer of our discontent than Tamara Johnson's waterless "Backyard Pool”, Twitter, July 20, 2014
McRae, Tess, Despite Mistakes, The Lot LIC series has what it takes to be great, Queens Chronicle: Qboro, 
August 7, 2014
ArtFCity Dream Exhibition Series: Week Nine: Dreaming About Pink Foam, Canned Shit, and SCULPTURE! 2014
RISD XYZ, Spring/Summer 2013
Salvador Castillo, I Wanna Be A Curator/ Instigate! 11, Bout What I sees blog, March 15
Rachel Eides, RISD Student Stages Art with Endangered Providence Building, Go Local Providence, May 18, 2011

Источник: http://www.tamarajohnsonstudio.com/about

 

B. 1984, Waco, TX
Currently lives in Dallas, TX.

 
Education

Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), Providence, RI
MFA Sculpture 2012

The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas
BFA Studio Art  2007

Solo central bank sedalia mo login Two Person Exhibitions
Squeeze, Tweeze, Please, MAD Arts, Dania Beach, FL. 2021
The Philosophy of Goo, in collaboration with Trey Burns, Wassaic Projects, Wassaic, NY, 2020
How to fold a fitted sheet, ex ovo, Dallas, TX. 2020
Nasher Windows Series, Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, TX. 2020
Picnic, Maria Hernandez Park, in conjunction with NYC Parks & Rec, Brooklyn, NY 2018
Bold Notion, The CORE: CLUB, New York, NY. 2018
No Your Boundaries, CUE Art Foundation, NY, NY. 2016
An Interior Complex, Sunroom Project Space at Wave Hill, Bronx, NY. 2015
Backyard Pool, @ The Lot in conjunction with Socrates Sculpture Park and Rockrose Development Corp., Long Island City, NY. 2014
Open to the Public, Rooster Gallery Contemporary Art: THE BATHROOM Project Space, NY, NY. 2014
Immaterial Labor, Callicarpa Gallery, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX. 2012


Selected Group Exhibitions
(UUU) Unbounded Unleashed Unforgiving: Reconsidering Cyberfeminism in 2021, Virtual exhibitionon New Art City hosted by College Art Association and
the New Media Caucus, 2021
Continuum,Carillon Gallery at Tarrant County College South, Ft Worth, TX. 2020
The Big T-Shirt Show, ex ovo Gallery, Dallas, TX. 2019
2019 Tuesday Evenings at the Modern: Films
, Ft Worth Modern Museum, Ft. Worth, TX. 2019
You’re Invited! Spring Break Art Show 2019,
New York, NY, 2019
Word/Play - SoundSpace,
The Blanton Museum of Art, Austin, TX, 2019
Shady Acres,
Utah Museum of Contemporary Art, SLC, UT, kansas ui benefits Lovin'
, Air Mattress Gallery, New York, NY, 2018
81: the shape of things to come, LatchKey Gallery, New York, NY, 2018
Call and Response, Wave Hill, Bronx, NY, 2017
SPRING BREAK Art Show, Fata Morgana, 4 Times Square, New York, NY, 2017
12 x 12, 2016, Black Ball Projects, Brooklyn, NY. 2016
GOING HARD: Digbeth First Friday Film Screenings, Grand Union Gallery, Birmingham, UK. 2016
U.K Performance Festival, Green River Project Room, Hillsdale, NY. 2016
12x12x12 Exhibition, Black Ball Project, Brooklyn, NY. 2015
SURPH, The Barn Show, East Hampton, NY. 2015
It’s Not What You Think, Philip Bloom Gallery, Nantucket, MA. 2015
SYMBOLIC SYMBIOTIC, Peridot Green quarterly salon hosted by American Cyborg, New York, NY. 2015
Positioning Systems, Microscope Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. 2015
Immediate Female, Judith Charles Gallery, New Doc holliday cross draw holster, NY. 2015                     
INFLUX 2014 pt. 1, CR10 Arts, Hudson, NY. 2014
GRAVITY, Projekt 722, Brooklyn, NY. 2014
SUN SCREENING vol. I, Videology, Brooklyn, NY. 2014
PATHWAYS: PAST/PRESENT, Mattress firm synchrony bank login Plant in conjunction with Burlington City Arts, Burlington, VT. 2014
I Try, and I Try, and I Try, Find & Form Space, Boston, MA. 2014
Fluid, Newhouse Center for Contemporary Art, Staten Island, NY. 2014
DALLAS BIENNIAL DB14, Eastfield College Gallery, Dallas, TX. 2014
A Public Pool, EAF 13: Emerging Artist Fellowship Exhibition, Socrates Sculpture Park, Long Island City, NY. 2013
VIDEOROVER: Season 7, NURTUREart Gallery, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
THIRTEEN TWENTY THREE EXHIBITION, 964 Dean St. Space, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
Bad Film Fest, NYC Comedy Bar, New York, NY. 2013
AUNTS TIME SHARE: CURATION CHAIN 4, Arts @ Renaissance, Brooklyn, NY. 2013
Spring Fever, 594 LOFT Gallery, Bushwick, NY. 2013
Game On, Spoke Gallery @ Medicine Wheel Productions, Boston, MA. 2013
State of the ART 2012, Chase Young Gallery, Boston, MA. 2012
Arrive Wherever You Can, Rooster Gallery Contemporary Art, New York, NY. 2012
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