in dire need of compassion movie online

groundwork to understand the negative impact of stress and trauma on learning and the importance of compassion and resilience in our work with students. What Is The Difference Between To Kill A Mockingbird Book And Movie Modern teenagers, more than anyone, are in dire need of the insightful life lessons. Our theme this month is The Rosary in Our Lives with the DVD: Pray the Movie. No cost or RSVP. Due to Covid restrictions no meal.

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In Dire Need of Compassion a film by Jonathan Nelson (Full Length Feature)

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Mei 2020, 2.00-3.30 pm SAST

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8 Ways to Communicate with a Husband When He Doesn’t Want to Listen

As wives, if our husbands aren’t listening to us, it’s a cue to re-evaluate how we’re speaking to them. Questions to ask ourselves include “How are we approaching them with our words?”

Are we pointing out all the negative things happening in the world, complaining, nagging, picking fights, or overloading our husbands with information?

As Proverbs 21:19 points out, “Better to live in a desert than with a quarrelsome and nagging wife.”

Because many men are wired to fix problems, our words can cause them to feel overwhelmed and overloaded, in trying to figure out how they can make everything right for us.

Whereas we may have all this information pent up inside of us and just want to vent or share it with our husbands, it may come out unleashed like a volcano, erupting and spewing a hot lava fire of words over him, covering him with a heavy burden to bear.

Proverbs 25:24, explains how a husband might feel at this bombarding, “Better to live on a corner of the roof than share a house with a quarrelsome wife.”

Through self-reflection we can determine if we need to adjust our speech, to consider more effective ways of approaching our husbands with our words on a day-to-day basis. We can examine the patterns we’ve set up of communicating with them and be open to changing how we speak to them.

2. Communicate through Editing

I’ve discovered like many women, that sometimes the more words I speak to my husband, the less of my words he seems to hear. 

Although I may think my talking is offering needed direction to him, stressing and strengthening my points, they may just be falling by the excessive expressions wayside.

Many women may believe “more is better,” when it comes to the amount of words we speak to our husbands. But instead of being beneficial, the more words we say can actually have the opposite effect, where our words become like a leaky, dripping roof in a rainstorm (Proverbs 27:15). 

Mysteriously the less words I speak to my husband, the more impact they seem to have on him and the more effectively he seems to receive them.  

Photo Credit: ©fizkes

Источник: https://www.ibelieve.com/relationships/ways-to-communicate-with-a-husband-when-he-doesnt-want-to-listen.html

[Watch] In Dire Need of Compassion 480p Download 2017










    In Dire Need of Compassion 2017-era-hell-error-2017-mbatha-raw-In Dire Need of Compassion-global-evil-stream hd-FLV-focus-spierig-reggae-2017-affiliates-In Dire Need of Compassion-pope-4k BluRay-genres-earlier-ifc-2017-jason-In Dire Need of Compassion-miniseries-media-2017-SDDS-places-luke-buddy-2017-simulations-In Dire Need of Compassion-sketch-DVDrip-location-entendre-portal-2017-young-In Dire Need of Compassion-jude-Watch In Dire Need of Compassion Online Reddit.jpg



    [Watch] In Dire Need of Compassion 480p Download 2017




    Movieteam

    Coordination art Department : Félicie Gweni

    Stunt coordinator : Rupert Cherise

    Script layout :Kalilou Jaimie

    Pictures : Éloïse Dalla
    Co-Produzent : Ginnie Gorz

    Executive producer : Conwell Naqib

    Director of supervisory art : Felipe Rivard

    Produce : Miley Lively

    Manufacturer : Madoka Paillet

    Actress : Ellie Dorotha


    Jovan is a Serbian immigrant whose wife has just died in child labor. He moves to Los Angeles to live with his wife’s twin sister, with whom he discovers a kindred romance. Jovan takes a job as a ride share driver, and finds himself in trouble using drugs and promiscuous sex to cope with loss. Living in a new world beyond his control, Jovan is anointed by visions of his wife that keep him on a path to salvation.









    Movie Title

    In Dire Need of Compassion

    Hour

    131 minute

    Release

    2017-03-14

    Quality

    MPEG 720p
    DVD

    Categorie

    Drama

    language


    castname

    Danaya
    C.
    Raison, Prerna R. Mélodie, Chereen A. Luna





    [HD] [Watch] In Dire Need of Compassion 480p Download 2017



    Film kurz

    Spent : $796,376,115

    Revenue : $792,221,719

    categories : Reden - Werbung , Patriotismus - Freiheit , Isolation - Terrorismus , Strategie - Barmherzigkeit

    Production Country : Birma

    Production : Troyca



    Источник: https://nhyabasarya.blogspot.com/2019/09/watch-in-dire-need-of-compassion-480p.html

    Coming Attractions: November 29 Through December 12 — What Will Light Your Fire

    Compiled by Bill Marx

    As the age of Covid-19 wanes (or waxes?), Arts Fuse critics supply a guide to film, dance, visual art, theater, and music. Please check with venues about whether the event is available by streaming or is in person. More offerings will be added as they come in.

    Film

    Prism
    November 29

    A Docyard Series presentation. Racism is deeply entrenched in our film culture in many ways, including its technical assumptions. For example, the lighting for movie cameras has traditionally been calibrated for white skin. Other production tools also reflect cinema’s racial prejudices. Three filmmakers explore the literal, theoretical, and philosophical dimensions of this history in a discursive, playful, and profound work of nonfiction that takes the form of a series of provocative and thematically linked discussions and interrogations.

    Luzzu
    through December 1
    Brattle Theater, Cambridge

    This stunning film from Malta, which played IFFBoston and Sundance, is a human drama shot in a neorealist style. Fisherman Jesmark, spends his days struggling at his trade — the fish are few and money is tight. He is a proud man with a colorful luzzu, a hand-painted wooden fishing boat that’s been passed down through the generations. When his infant son requires medical attention he is forced to compromise time-honored principles. A riveting study of Old World values pit against the realities of the modern world. Trailer

    Artificial Gamer
    Coolidge Corner Theatre
    December 2 at 7 p.m.

    A passionate team of engineers from the company OpenAI is challenged to develop an artificial intelligence capable of defeating the World Champions of DOTA 2, a video game more complex than anything attempted by AI in the past — and given only one year to do it. The outcome could alter the way we think about advanced AI systems. Q&A with filmmaker Chad Herschberger, producer Jennifer 8. Lee, and film subjects

    Wood and Water
    Coolidge Corner Theatre
    December 5 at 1:30 p.m.

    The Goethe Institute presentation. Anke retires from her job at a church in rural Black Forest in order to to reunite with her children who are living near the Baltic Sea. They had been together there, happily, as a young family. Her son Max is unable to join them because of protests in Hong Kong. She has been out of touch with him for many years and after an otherwise uneventful summer, spent in nostalgia and facing the void of retirement, she decides to visit him. A mother wants to check in on her children every now and then, but Hong Kong is also her adventure, her escape. The Goethe Institute presentation.

    Reviewed on The Arts Fuse and Currently Playing

    C’Mon C’Mon reviewed by Erica Abeel
    Belfast reviewed by Ezra Haber Glenn
    The Power of the Dog reviewed by Tim Jackson
    The Electrical Life of Louis Wain reviewed by Peg Aloi
    Karen Dalton: In My Own Time reviewed by Ed Symkus

    — Tim Jackson


    Theater

    COVID PROTOCOLS: Check with specific theaters: requirements often include proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 rapid test. Also, companies are requiring masks at indoor performances.

    The Alchemist by Ben Jonson. Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher. Directed by Jesse Berger. Staged by Red Bull Theater at New World Stages, 340 West 50th Street, New York, New York, through December 19.

    Jonsonians rejoice! A chance to see (an adaptation) of the 1610 script, first performed by the King’s Men, that Samuel Taylor Coleridge considered to have one of the three most perfect plots in literature. Has anything changed? Bullies of all description still fleece each other during plague time. “When a wealthy gentleman flees to the country, his trusted servant opens his house to a pair of con artists who set up an animated den of criminal capitalism. Claiming alchemical powers, the quick-witted trio fleece an onslaught of greedy sheep with their miraculous ability to improvise amidst increasingly frantic comings and goings. It’s comic gold with dupes, double-dupes, duels, disguises, and a lucky flea named ‘Lewis.'”

    I hope Hatcher didn’t get rid of one of Jonson’s great jokes. Lovewit, panicked member of the upper-middle class, returns home to London once he believes it is safe, but he is wary. (He has kept his distance “While there dies one, a week, / O’ the plague.” Some claimed that corrupted human breath could transmit the disease, which explains Lovewit’s nervous instructions to a servant (who insists he has not been ill) to “Breathe less, and further off.” Jonson knew that the audience members at the show, hearing that line, would look nervously at those seated around them. The plague was not entirely gone in 1610.

    White Rabbit Red Rabbit by Nassim Soleimanpour. An online event presented by Arts Emerson, December 7 through 12.

    “This contemporary piece features a different actor each night who reads the play for the first time in front of a live virtual audience. From there the actor gives their interpretation of the words of Iranian dramatist Nassim Soleimanpour — resulting in a theatrical experience that can never be replicated. Soleimanpour wrote White Rabbit Red Rabbit in 2010 while he was forbidden from leaving his home country because of his refusal to participate in military service. The play dissects power in a wild, truly original structure, pairing the experience of isolation with daring, unexpected comedy. A new actor will open the script in front of a live virtual audience for the first and last time during the play’s run at ArtsEmerson; in total, six actors will perform the piece as part of this engagement.”

    Theater of War: Institute for Veterans and MilitaryFamilies, an online event, December 7.

    “Theater of War is an innovative public health project that presents readings of scenes from ancient Greek plays as a catalyst for guided discussions about the challenges faced by service members, veterans, and their families. Using Sophocles’ Ajax –an ancient play about the suicide of a great, respected warrior—to forge a common vocabulary for openly discussing the visible and invisible wounds of war, these events are aimed at generating compassion and understanding between diverse audiences.”

    “This special presentation is being co-presented by the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University as part of their Syracuse Serves initiative and is open to the public.”

    Featuring performances by Taylor Schilling, David Strathairn, David Denman, Nyasha Hatendi, Marjolaine Goldsmith (Company Manager of Theater of War Productions), Jumaane Williams (Public Advocate of New York City), and Bryan Doerries.

    The Last Five Years, written and composed by Jason Robert Brown. Directed by Leigh Barrett. Musical direction by Dan Rodriguez. Staged by the Lyric Stage Company at 140 Clarendon Street, Boston, through December 12.

    “There are always two sides to every story; the story depends on who is telling it. This is an emotionally powerful and intimate musical about two New Yorkers in their twenties who fall in and out of love over the course of five years. The show’s unconventional structure consists of Cathy telling her story backwards while Jamie tells his story chronologically.” Arts Fusereview

    The Half-Life of Marie Curie by Lauren Gunderson. Directed by Bryn Boice. Produced by The [email protected] Square Theater (A Catalyst [email protected] Production) at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, through December 12.

    The plot: “Summer, 1912. Two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie takes refuge with her friend Hertha Aryton, renowned mechanical engineer, after the outing of Marie’s scandalous affair with the married Paul Langevin.” This two-hander dramatizes their “deep friendship, their struggles with double standards, the danger of discoveries, and their passion for science and family.” Considerable theatrical radiance will no doubt be supplied by the casting of vets Lee Mikeska Gardner and Underground Railway’s Debra Wise. Arts Fusereview

    The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Danielle Fauteux Jacques. Staged by the Apollinaire Theatre Company at the Chelsea Theatre Works 189 Winnisimmet Street, Chelsea, MA, through December 19.

    A revival of an Apollinaire Theatre Company production of Wilde’s comedy. That new version contains 4 of the 8 original actors “taking over all the roles!”

    The Rise and Fall of Holly Fudge by Trista Baldwin. Directed by Courtney Sale. Staged by the Merrimack Repertory Theatre at Liberty Hall, 50 East Merrimack Street, Lowell, MA, through December 12. Video on Demand: December 16-26

    The world premiere of a very relevant holiday comedy (which takes place during the pandemic!) commissioned by Merrimack Rep. “Christmas 2020. Carol is a hard-working single mother who makes award-winning “Holly” fudge, named after her daughter. She serves it every holiday. She gifts it to her friends and co-workers. She’s determined that this year won’t be any different, even if she has to wear a mask while whipping up her famous dessert. But with her daughter Holly’s girlfriend crashing Christmas, her neighbor’s new-found love of confectionery, and the protests erupting on her front lawn, Carol is finding it tough to make this the most wonderful time of year.”

    Witness by Nana Grinstein with Blair Cadden & Igor Golyak. Conceived and directed by Igor Golyak . Scenography & Costume Design by Anna Fedorova. Produced by Sara Stackhouse Featuring the Arlekin Acting Company. Staged by Arlekin Players Theatre and Zero Gravity (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab, a live virtual offering that will include a post-show talkback with members of the cast and creative team, December 10 through January 23, 2022.

    The world premiere of  “a new documentary theater piece about Jewish immigration in the face of antisemitism.” The play “brings actors and audience together from around the world for a shared immersive experience set on a boat in digital space.  The piece is inspired by the journey of the MS St. Louis, which left Hamburg in 1939 with over 900 Jewish people on board and headed to Cuba only to be turned away, leaving the passengers stranded with nowhere to go and no escape.” The play “shares stories of Jewish immigrants from around the globe through an interactive virtual theater experience at the nexus of film, theater and video games.”

    Incels and Other Myths by Ally Sass. Directed by Erica Terpening-Romeo. A BU New Play Initiative production, produced by Boston Playwrights’ Theatre and the Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Theatre at the Boston Playwrights Theatre, 949 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, December 2 through 12.

    “The drama journeys into the online realms of gender, power and mythology when Elaine, a teacher of Women in Mythology, grows concerned when son Avery spends much of his time playing the online adventure game Oracle, involving himself in the notorious, misogynistic “incel” community. Through their descent into fraught online territory, Avery and Elaine discover unexpected and intoxicating new realities that shape how they see their own worlds.

    Teenage Dickby Mike Lew. Directed by Moritz von Stuelpnagel. Staged by the Huntington Theatre Company at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, Boston, December 2 through January 2, 2022 (with digital access to the filmed performance through January 16, 2022). The production is produced in association with Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company (Washington, DC) and Pasadena Playhouse (Pasadena, CA). The play originated at Ma-Yi Theatre Company (New York, NY) in association with The Public Theater (New York, NY).

    This adaption of Shakespeare Richard III “centers on a high school outsider named Richard. Bullied because of his cerebral palsy, Richard decides to exact revenge on his class enemies by becoming the senior class president. But all the scheming, manipulation, and revenge plots force him to ask the age-old question: is it better to be loved or feared?”

    — Bill Marx


    Rock

    A tradition returns, as the Tedeschi Trucks Band performs its final shows of the year at a four-night residency at the Orpheum Theater in Boston starting Nov. 30. Tickets for that two-set “evening with” show and for the Dec. 1 concert with opener Miko Marks remain. The two-set concerts on Dec. 3 and 4 are sold out.

    The pandemic put the kibosh on the residency last year, and it’s only been a few months now since the full-strength Tedeschi Trucks Band has been back in business. Guitar mavens and band leaders Derek Trucks and Norwell native Susan Tedeschi led a scaled-down version of the troupe for a run of summer concerts, which proved to be a very satisfying alternative.

    Yet when the whole 12-member-strong TTB took the stage at New York City’s Beacon Theater for a seven-night run earlier this fall, it was a joyous explosion of music, with the full horn section and all of the backing vocalists elevating the proceedings. The band’s new drummer, Isaac Eady, has also seamlessly woven his talents into the group alongside co-drummer Tyler Greenwell.

    If past years of the Orpheum residency prove anything, expect TTB to leave it all on the stage — the 2019 three-night residency, for instance, featured 61 unique songs with no repeats — before the band members head home for the holidays.

    — Scott McLennan


    Roots and World Music

    Warren Ertle’s Hot Peppers with special guest Vince Giordano
    November 30
    Crystal Ballroom, Somerville Theater

    The Somerville Theater’s new upstairs venue has been dedicating Tuesday to the kind of swing dances that might have been presented when the ballroom was first in use decades ago. Pianist Warren Ertle, a student of the Jelly Roll Morton approach, will be leading a band that includes bassist Vince Giordano, whose Nighthawks are the longtime kings of the New York vintage jazz scene.

    Matt Flinner and Low Lily
    December 8
    Club Passim, Cambridge

    The music calendar is chock full of holiday shows. One of the more enticing, low-key options is this Solstice-themed night of roots and bluegrass from veteran superpicker Flinner in combination with Low Lily, an aggregation of three of New England’s beloved acoustic singers and players: Lissa Schneckenburger (vocals, fiddle), Liz Simmons (vocals, guitar), and Flynn Cohen (vocals, guitar, mandolin) .

    — Noah Schaffer


    Dance

    KAIROS at Medicine Wheel
    November 30, 11:59 p.m.
    Boston Center for the Arts, Boston

    Produced annually since 1992, Medicine Wheel is the largest recurring site-specific public art event in Boston. It is led by visual artist Michael Dowling and presented in the historic Cyclorama at Boston Center for the Arts. KAIROS Dance Theater will open this remembrance of the tragedy of the AIDS epidemic on November 30 when the clock strikes midnight. That kicks off a full 24-hour December 1st vigil of prayer, dance, song, and ritual.

    And further afield…

    Newport Nutcracker at Rosecliff
    through December 3
    Rosecliff Mansion, Newport, RI

    It’s officially Nutcracker season, and with it comes the 20th anniversary of the enchanting, site-specific Newport Nutcracker at Rosecliff. Find yourself swept up in the magic of Rosecliff Mansion’s magnificent ballrooms and staircases as this classic ballet unfolds around you. Note: All patrons must be 12+, provide proof of vaccination, and wear masks to this performance.

    — Merli V. Guerra


    Visual Arts

    Quilts, community, and memory have been connected since the beginning of the craft, but in recent decades the scope of quiltmaking has become increasingly ambitious. At this point, it has expanded into playing a role in medical crises, including issues of death, survival, and commemoration.

    Organized in 2020, the Boston Area Mask Initiative  (BAMI) brought together hundreds of volunteers to create hand-sewn face masks for medical staff, essential workers, and others in need of them during the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of the leftover fabric from 50,000 masks, BAMI craftspeople and volunteers stitched together the Commemorative Mask Scrap Quilt in memory of those lost to COVID, as well as in honor of those struggling to survive. For about a month, staring on December 4, Brockton’s Fuller Craft Museum will display the colorful king-sized quilt to the public. This represents a new and vital entry in the social history of the craft.

    Several museums are marking World AIDS Day and Day With(out) Art in December via an annual tradition that was begin by the activist group Visual AIDS more than 30 years ago. Hartford’s Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art will hold a virtual World AIDS Day Poetry Reading and Performance on December 1 at 6 p.m. The participants will include Hartford Poet Laureate and HIV/AIDS activist Frederick Douglass Knowles II, former New London poet laureate Rhonda Ward, and Summer Tate, a Hartford area teacher and poet. The event will also commemorate Shawn Lang, former deputy director of AIDS Connecticut, who died earlier this year. The online event is free of charge.

    In connection with its exhibition States of Play: Prints from Rembrandt to Delsarte, which opened in September, the Harvard Art Museums will present Playing with States: A Conversation with Local Printmakers on December 8 at 4 p.m. (the title of both the exhibition and the event pun on the printmaking term “state,” which is used to mark different stages in the creation of a print’s development and editions). The virtual event will feature curator Elizabeth Rudy and art conservator Christina Taylor in a lively conversation with Boston area printmakers on the “state” of local printmaking.

    On December 5, the Worcester Art Museum will hold a live and on-site Community Day to celebrate Hanukkah and WAM 2021. Organized for the third year in partnership with the Worcester Jewish Community Center and the Jewish Federation of Central MA, the celebrations will continue all day on Sunday from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. There will be presentations for all ages, including Klezmer music, live latke-making demonstrations, story times, and discussions about the traditions and history of the holiday. Admission to the museum and all the events are free all day long.

    The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown will present the lecture Graphic Battles — Art as Quilombo on December 7 at 5 p.m., with Roberto Conduru, the Endowed Distinguished Professor of Art History at Southern Methodist University. Professor Conduru’s talk will focus on the Brazilian quilombos, or communities of escaped African slaves known as maroons in the colonial period, as “marginal” territories (of temporary or permanent duration) that served as opposition to formal colonial settlements. He will juxtapose maps from the 17th and 18th centuries with recent works (in many media) by Afro-Brazilian artists, including James Lauriano, Wagner Leitz Viana, Goya Lopes, and Tiago Sant’Ana, who draw on quilombos as symbols for their artistic activism. The lecture video will be posted on December 7 and will be available until December 11 on the museum’s website.

    — Peter Walsh


    Jazz

    Donal Fox
    December 3 at 8 p.m.
    Live Stream

    GBH and JazzBoston present this live, free virtual concert by distinguished, multifaceted pianist and composer Donal Fox, live from GBH’s Fraser Performance Studio. Fox came to the fore with his jazz mashups of composers like Monk, Bach, and Scarlatti. This show will include a mix of Fox’s original takes on those composers as well as pieces inspired by Chopin, Coltrane, Piazzolla, Horace Silver, and others. GBH jazz radio host Eric Jackson and classical music host Cathy Fuller will co-moderate the event, including discussion with Fox and taking questions from the virtual audience. The event is free, but registration is required.

    Eliane Elias
    December 3 and 4 at 8 p.m.
    Scullers Jazz Club, Boston

    No doubt these four performances will show off the multimillion-record-selling, Grammy-winning talents of the Brazilian-born Eliane Elias as a double threat: Brazilian samba and bossa singer and killer jazz pianist. (Her latest disc, Mirror Mirror, is a series of duets with Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés.)

    Julian Lage Trio
    December 3 at 8 p.m
    Berklee Peformance Center, Boston

    Guitarist Julian Lage has been a rising star to watch ever since his emergence with the Gary Burton Quartet as a teenager. Now 33, with a clutch of impressive albums as a leader behind him (including outstanding duo discs with pianist Fred Hersch and guitarist Nels Cline), he’s the fully realized deal. This year’s Squint shows his ever voracious ears are what feed his extraordinary chops and make them worth hearing — post-bop, country, French impressionism, international folk musics. It’s all there, fully synthesized in Lage’s unique sound. He’s joined for this show by his trio-mates from the album, bassist Jorge Roeder and drummer Dave King (of the Bad Plus).

    “New Standards”
    December 8 at 8 p.m.
    Red Room at Café 939, Boston

    Kinda crazy supergroup playing Berklee’s Red Room at Café 939: drummer-composer-activist Terri Lyne Carrington, pianist-composer Kris Davis, bassist-composer Linda May Han Oh, and special guest, trumpeter-composer Ambrose Akinmusere. These heavy cats will be playing with students from the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice, of which Carrington is the founding artistic director and Davis is an associate director. They’ll be playing songs from the forthcoming book New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, which will also be featured the upcoming album New Standards, Vol. One.

    Jason Palmer Quintet
    December 11 at 3 p.m.
    Arlington Street Church, Boston
    Free

    Trumpeter and composer Jason Palmer has been one of the most important jazz musicians on the Boston scene for the past decade — helming the house jazz band at the venerable Wally’s in the South End, a go-to guy for local bandleaders and bands visiting town, leading his own bands and releasing his own provocative recordings projects. Besides being a singular musical intelligence on the bandstand, he’s one of the people who make this scene happen. For this show, the theme will be “holiday favorites, inspired by Ellington and Jones.” (Duke and Thad, that is.) This free concert from Celebrity Series of Boston (the last of this season’s Neighborhood Arts & Community Music Series) will also be available to stream on-demand on YouTube, for three months, beginning December 16 at 8 p.m. But come on, check it out in person!

    Eddie Palmieri
    December 11 at 8 and 10 p.m.
    Scullers Jazz Club, Boston

    If you want to hear great salsa-jazz, you might as well check out one of the guys who invented it — pianist and composer Eddie Palmieri. Palmieri’s Afro-Latin grooves are deathless, just as his inventiveness as a pianist is endless (his prime influences were Thelonious Monk and McCoy Tyner). About to turn 85 (December 15), Palmieri in recent clips and recordings is still a wonder.

    — Jon Garelick


    Author Events

    Virtual Event: Kevin Birmingham – Harvard Book Store
    The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece
    November 29 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 suggested donation

    The Sinner and the Saint is the deeply researched and immersive tale of how Dostoevsky came to write his great murder story [Crime and Punishment] and why it changed the world. As a young man, Dostoevsky was a celebrated writer, but his involvement with the radical politics of his day condemned him to a long Siberian exile. There, he spent years studying the criminals that were his companions. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in the 1860s, he fought his way through gambling addiction, debilitating debt, epilepsy, the deaths of those closest to him, and literary banishment to craft an enduring classic.”

    Virtual Event: Faith Jones with Amanda Montell – brookline booksmith
    Sex Cult Nun
    November 29 at 8 p.m.
    Free

    Educated meets The Vow in this story of liberation and self-empowerment — an inspiring and stranger-than-fiction memoir of growing up in and breaking free from the Children of God, an oppressive, extremist religious cult.

    “Faith Jones was raised to be part of an elite army preparing for the End Times. Growing up on an isolated farm in Macau, she prayed for hours every day and read letters of prophecy written by her grandfather, the founder of the Children of God. Tens of thousands of members strong, the cult followers looked to Faith’s grandfather as their guiding light. As such, Faith was celebrated as special and then punished doubly to remind her that she was not.”

    Virtual Event: Robert A. Gross – Harvard Book Store
    The Transcendentalists and Their World
    November 30 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 suggested donation

    The Transcendentalists and Their World offers a fresh view of the thinkers whose outsize impact on philosophy and literature would spread from tiny Concord to all corners of the earth. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the Alcotts called this New England town home, and Thoreau drew on its life extensively in his classic Walden. But Concord from the 1820s through the 1840s was no pastoral place fit for poets and philosophers.”

    Virtual Event: Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, and Jeremy M. Weinstein – Harvard Book Store
    System Error: How Big Tech Went Wrong and How To Reboot It
    December 2 at 12 p.m.
    Free with $5 contribution

    System Error exposes the root of our current predicament: how big tech’s relentless focus on optimization is driving a future that reinforces discrimination, erodes privacy, displaces workers, and pollutes the information we get. This optimization mindset substitutes what companies care about for the values that we as a democratic society might choose to prioritize. Well-intentioned optimizers fail to measure all that is meaningful and, when their creative disruptions achieve great scale, they impose their values upon the rest of us.”

    Virtual Event: Neal Stephenson with David Keith – Porter Square Books
    Termination Shock: A Novel
    December 2 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 contribution

    “Ranging from the Texas heartland to the Dutch royal palace in the Hague, from the snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas to the sunbaked Chihuahuan Desert, Termination Shock brings together a disparate group of characters from different cultures and continents who grapple with the real-life repercussions of global warming. Ultimately, it asks the question: Might the cure be worse than the disease?

    Epic in scope while heartbreakingly human in perspective, Termination Shock sounds a clarion alarm, ponders potential solutions and dire risks, and wraps it all together in an exhilarating, witty, mind-expanding speculative adventure.”

    WBUR CitySpace: Huma Abedin – brookline booksmith
    December 7 at 6 p.m.
    Tickets are $25 w/ reservations, $15 general admission, $5 student

    “Radio Boston host Tiziana Dearing moderates a conversation with Huma Abedin, longtime aide to Hillary Clinton, about her new memoir, Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds. From a cloistered childhood spent in Saudi Arabia to the inner circle of the Clinton White House, Abedin chronicles her journey and addresses for the first time the humiliating collision of her personal and professional life.”

    Live with Brookline Booksmith! Adam Schiff: Midnight in Washington – brookline booksmith
    Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could
    December 11 at 2 p.m.
    $35 with signed copy of book, $8 general admission

    “In Midnight in Washington, Schiff argues that the Trump presidency has so weakened our institutions and compromised the Republican Party that the peril will last for years, requiring unprecedented vigilance against the growing and dangerous appeal of authoritarianism.

    The congressman chronicles step by step just how our democracy was put at such risk, and traces his own path to meeting the crisis—from serious prosecutor, to congressman with an expertise in national security and a reputation for bipartisanship, to liberal lightning rod, scourge of the right, and archenemy of a president. Schiff takes us inside his team of impeachment managers and their desperate defense of the constitution amid the rise of a distinctly American brand of autocracy.”

    — Matt Hanson

    By: Bill MarxFiled Under: Coming Attractions, Featured, PreviewTagged: Bill-Marx, Jon Garelick, Matt Hanson, Merli V. Guerra, Noah Schaffer, peter-Walsh, Scott McLennan, Tim Jackson

    Источник: https://artsfuse.org/241829/coming-attractions-november-29-through-december-12-what-will-light-your-fire/




    1. Chloë Caro


    Sometimes credited as: Chloe Caro


    "In Dire Need of Compassion"



















    Keywords:

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    IP address and access time recorded for security purposes. Unauthorized access attempts will result in immediate suspension and cancellation. Go here, if you don't remember your account details.




    Источник: https://www.erotic4u.eu/Chlo%C3%AB_Caro-nude-in-In-Dire-Need-of-Compassion-157504.htm

    We are following what is happening all over the world related to Covid-19 and the impact it has on artists, the arts and the cultural field and life in general everywhere. Many artists, festival and arts organisers by now had to cancel events, festivals, performances etc and it seems that this unprecedented crisis will have further effect on all our activities for the upcoming months.

    At the same time, we see proposals for solidarity arising as well as new initiatives and online festivals. We are all in this together: artists, festivals, staff, arts organisations, audiences, sponsors, funders etc.

    We share here initiatives our alumni and festival colleagues are developing as a response, as proposals for solidarity or as strategies on how to deal with this situation of the Covid-19 epidemic.

    If you would like to share any initiatives, feel free to contact us at [email protected]

    We continue our work, which is needed as ever, together with you!

    Alumni Working group

    One year after taking part in the Valetta Atelier (23-29 March 2019), some of its alumni initiated an online gathering to reconnect and share stories on how the global COVID-19 pandemic is affecting their festivals and communities. Mentors from the programme and alumni of other Ateliers also joined the conversation.

    Each person shared a short update of the situation in their country, how this was impacting their festival and livelihood, their most pressing concerns and challenges, and any creative solutions they had come across or were pursuing.  

    While we are still trying to grasp what is going on, with most of us currently in quarantine or going into lockdown, we are simultaneously trying to understand what this may mean for the future of arts, festivals and society as a whole. Some early questions and outcomes where formulated during this first informal meeting which you can find here.

    We hope these discussions in dire need of compassion movie online us to find the courage and creativity to take this crisis as an opportunity to dare and re-imagine a post COVID-19 world. What are the key lessons from this crisis, for humanity as a whole, what do we want to see changed, how can the arts and festivals play a leading role in this transformation?

    As a result themed alumni working sessions have been set up which are organised bi-weekly to continue sharing our stories, to tackle some of these issues more in depth and to collect information and ideas that come out of these sessions with a broader community. Please follow us online here. 

    You can find out more about these sessions here.

    COVID-19 Risk Assessment Generator

    In the UK and many other countries any musicians that perform have to provide a risk assessment document. To make things easy, Adam Mezzatesta of the Bands For Hire music agency has created a free risk assessment tool that allows musicians to input their details, edit the template fields and download a pdf.

    You can find the tool here. 

    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the city of San Francisco, California has put forth a number of proposals for immediate action to support the arts, including a universal basic income (UBI) program for local artists. The UBI programme will provide up to 130 artists, teaching artists, arts organizations, and cultural workers with $1,000 a month for at least six months starting early 2021. 

    Find more information about the city's proposals to support artists here. 

    Information about how to apply for an artist's grant can be found here. 

    The African Culture Fund is opening call for proposals within its Solidarity Fund for African Artists & Cultural Organisation (SOFACO). It aims to support for creation and resilience to African artists facing the COVID-19 crisis. 

    Read the entire call here.

    Festivals for Compassion is giving the chance to festivals around Europe to express their solidarity in these times of Corona by presenting a new solo composition by the Greek-Dutch composer Calliope Tsoupaki. Each festival selects their own artist and instrument. The piece will be premiered on the Dutch NPO Radio 4 on 20 June, with the Flemish Klara taking over the next day.  After this, like a relay race of compassion, the work will begin its journey through Europe travelling from festival to festival, and will be shared online.

    Find out more here.

    The European Cultural Foundation aims to promote an European sentiment through developing and supporting cultural initiatives.

    On Friday 11 September, they will host a webcare session  on Community Conversations Democracy festivals, Corona & the future with the case study of the Latvian Conversation Festival LAMPA. 

    Found out more on their website and Facebook page. 

    The Sustaining Theatre and Dance (STAND) Foundation is an independent, non-profit and public benefit entity created by individuals within the sector to nurture, promote and celebrate contemporary South African dance and theatre.

    Recently, they have been developing many projects related to the situation with Covid-19, mental wellness and the current state of the arts.

    Find out more about their projects here.

    Function Central published this helpful guide which covers important topics such as:

    • How Coronavirus impacted the events industry worldwide, but also led to innovations like virtual conferences and digital events capable of reaching global audiences.
    • How events might look like during (and after) the pandemic, and how event planners can ensure food hygiene, safety, and social distancing.
    • Why it's more important than ever to plan for inclusivity and accessibility (e.g. captioning, sign language interpretation, audio descriptions) - whether it's an in-person, virtual, or hybrid event.
    • Other useful disability awareness and event planning resources - found in the other chapters of the guide.

    Read it here.

    This music-oriented digital magazine aiming to provide the best reviews and guides on musical instruments is sharing in-depth guides helping musicians cope during this Covid pandemic. Have a look at it below: 

    QANTARA Platform

    The initiative is to launch concerts via internet live streaming.

    Many artists are willing to participate in this initiative, bbva compass clearspend was named "Qantara"

    Qantara is a program in partnerships with artists and cultural institutions in Egypt during the current pause of cultural activities due to the Coronavirus.

    Qantara in the Arabic language is the bridge that we wish to pass safely through all of the moments and difficult days that we go through together, for other happy days after the end of this epidemic.

    Artists and bands:

    • Massar Egbari
    • Hawas
    • Meshwar
    • Amr Galal
    • Egypador
    • Rokam
    • Hageen

    The Qantara team will announce the rest of the participants soon, as they are continuing to receive requests to participate in their initiative.

    Have a look at their page to know more about the initiative.

    Due to the corona virus many artists are stuck in quarantine zones, not being able to travel, to do their jobs, to earn a living. Jakob Lohmann created a Facebook group which aims to create a community of artists in such situation to help each other through this period.

    This initiative was started after the Corona Virus forced Italy to close off the entire region of Lombardia. 
    Many artists are struggling under the Virus as they lose access to their studios, as exhibitions and shows are being canceled, as theatres stay closed. Especially for self-employed artists the consequences very quickly result in a financially existential threat. People are finding creative ways to deal with the individual situations they are in, they make the best of it.

    "With this initiative I want to shine a light onto these people and to tell their stories." Jakob Lohmann

    You can have a look at the Facebook page here and you can support these artists through sharing the page, liking their posts, as well as through donations to the artists themselves. 

    The Social Distancing Festival

    Nick Green is a playwright in Toronto. On Friday March 13, he became one of many artists to have a production cancelled due to the need for social distancing because of the spread of Coronavirus (COVID-19).

    He created a site for celebrating  artists and the work that has been cancelled/delayed/disrupted. So far, submissions have included clips from rehearsals, scenes done with cast-mates over webcam, recordings from previous workshops, design plans, and performers just doing the song they were really excited about singing into their webcam. 

    Nick and his team are collecting work to put up on the site, and will be launching a TON of content on Saturday, and then updating regularly.

    In the meantime, their Live Streamed Events page is being updated regularly, and Nick will be featuring work throughout the week, as you can see on their Feature Work page!

    This is a chance to celebrate the work that Artists didn’t get to share, and enjoy a sense of solidarity and community with fellow artists.

    Have a look at the website !

    "Keep engaged! Keep creating! You aren’t alone!" Nick Green

    Teatru Malta

    Teatru Malta is inviting all performing artists to send them a short video (up to 15min long), to allow these artists to share their theatrical work through the platform in this time of Covid-19 unstable environment. It can be a group or individual video.

    Here are some possibilities (but not limited to!) 

    • A theatrical performance, mime, skit or storytelling
    • A poetry reading or a series of haiku
    • An interactive community dance theatre piece with your family (pets welcome too)
    • An original musical theatre performance with instruments and home appliances

    The citizens financial group news will choose the ideas they believe can become the best possible videos. Teatru Malta will then pay €100 to each performer/artist involved in the making, upon receipt of invoice. 

    Applications started being received as of Friday the 13th and will close on March 20th at noon. All the short-listed selected videos will be posted on Teatru Malta’s facebook page. Their FOUR favourite videos will then be posted on World Theatre Day, on the 27th March 2020

    The video should be sent to Teatru Malta and will be uploaded exclusively by the team, the creative property of the video will remain of the artists. 

    Applications with the below details should be sent to: [email protected]

    You can have a look at their website here!

    FIST SOCIETY

    Festival of International Student Theatre (FIST) is created in 2005, at the initiative of the students of Management and Production of Theatre, Radio and Culture at the Faculty of Dramatic Arts in Belgrade. Organized by students, FIST’s mission is to create an environment that brings together young theatre enthusiasts and gives them a platform to talk about their experiences and show their skills, as well as to present different theatrical practices of students from all around the world.

    The fifteenth edition of FIST will is being held from march 14th to march 20th 2020, only this year it is arriving in digital environment.

    Given the current social situation on a global level, previously planned activities of the Festival of International Student Theatre (FIST) are taking place online. The Festival was originally supposed to gather 11 academies from all Europe in different theatres in Belgrade, but having in mind the recent social events, we are moving its activities to web.

    The new conception of the Festival does not include the arrival of the troupes from abroad anymore, though it is including and presenting them with an innovative, contemporary and interactive way. Previous conception and form of the Festival are adapted and moved to online environment, that way the troupes from abroad have the chance to participate via live stream or by broadcasting the videos of their plays as a part of main program. 

    Have a look at their website here! Here is also a link to their manifest.

    GIFT

    GIFT 2020 will still be going ahead between 1st - 3rd May - online, as a digital festival.

    The team has developed plans with the artists who were due to be part of the festival in Gateshead this year, to create an online experience in keeping with the spirit of GIFT - with lots of opportunity for connection between artists, audiences and participants. They are celebrating this as a real opportunity for experimentation, and to build on the experiences from their online iteration of GIFT 2015.

    They are using this as an opportunity to explore what is possible across a range of open access platforms, and as a way of remaining connected as a community. We also see this as an exciting opportunity to reach new audiences and participants for GIFT globally. 

    The team will be making announcements across their social platforms about this imminently.

     GIFT 2020 will include work by a host of really exceptional artists and companies including Tania El Khoury, Action Hero, Greg Wohead, Atresbandes, Luca Rutherford, Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion amongst others.

    They have been able to maintain their agreement with the programmed artists and the freelance team who deliver GIFT at this point in time  - at what is obviously a devastating time for the sector.

    Catch global artists and brilliant new works. Immerse yourself in sensory experiences, experimental works in progress and lively debates - and all from the comfort of your armchair. Book up your festival weekend now, with a packed programme of events and performances shown in real time, and join artists and audiences tuning in worldwide to encounter bold new works, share human stories and build personal networks (with a virtual cocktail party if that’s your thing) at giftfestival.co.uk. 

    To be kept up to date with their plans, you can follow them across social media platforms @GIFTfest and also via their website.

    Have a look at an article recounting the impressive and ingenious work it has been here.

    Since GIFT took place last weekend, the GIFT team had a number of people contact them with queries about some of the decisions they took moving GIFT online. 

    As a response to these queries, this Thursday 14 May at 3pm, members of the GIFT team will be hosting a zoom webinar called Strategy to Stage - taking a theatre festival online as a way of sharing some of the processes and decision making they went through to deliver GIFT 2020. 

    Spaces are limited and need to be booked in advance via this link 

    RECONNECT ONLINE PERFORMANCE FESTIVAL

    The team has decided to launch a festival of live digital performances. An online festival for all the artists to challenge their creativity, to come together on an online platform to "Re-Connect", to network and to bring joy to themselves and their audience.

    This Festival is a nonprofit volunteer activity and in dire need of compassion movie online invitation to participate in a group to create an alternative space for artists. 

    Performances should be designed for Instagram live feature, taking into account the features of this media.

    Each performance can be performed by one or more performers. (In one space, or sharing live feed online - of course for health consideration In the current situation, the presence of artists in one space is not recommended.)

    The use of classical texts or stage plays is permitted if the texts and performances are based on the online platform. The priority is with works written and designed solely for online performance.

    The time limit for each performance is between 15- 2 minutes.

    Deadline to apply: 30 March 2020. You can contact them at [email protected]

    You can have a look at the article presenting this new Online Festival here.

    Dr Bill Aitchison

    Dr Bill Aitchison started an initiative as the collective Last Minute Live Art which is working with people around the world to create interactive 1 to 1 performances that can be given and watched in private apartments. These performances are made in response to the situation of being quarantined as a result of the virus. The performances are made over a video call and that will connect performer and audience. The collective has just organized their first performances which will start next month within the festival programme of the Chinese University of Hong Kong. They are actively looking for performers who are willing to work with them to develop a performance and for opportunities to present this work to a wider public.

    Have a look at his website and at his Facebook Page !

    Coronavirus

    All sectors are affected by the Covid-19 pandemia but we are very much aware that the alternative and independent art scene is / will be particularly under pressure. This list of resources has been compiled by On the Move, in partnership with Circostrada*, as a way to gather information and initiatives internationally (particularly in Europe, Asia and the USA) that can be useful to share, know about and/or be inspired from. 

    This list is by no means comprehensive and can be easily enriched thanks to your feedback and proposal to include new resources. Feel free to email them any initiative related to one of the sub-topics below at mobility(at)on-the-move.org 

    Have a look at the website here.

    NordicBaltic Festival Platform

    The NordicBaltic Festival Paltform aims to foster cultural cooperation in the region by enhancing the number and strength of connections as well as the capacity and visibility of festivals in the area. 

    The team offers Live streams which are unique opportunities to see a LIVEstreamed performances on the FestivalsOnDemand website. The first one took place on Wednesday, 18.03.2020, from the Plastforma: Forum of Physical Theaters in Minsk, Belarus.

    In this time of Quarantine, the team is sharing performing arts online, providing the chance to continue engaging with the regions festivals! Find out more about the production and join the free live stream here - https://festivalsondemand.com/…/welcoming-the-sun-live-fro…/

    International Virtual Conference

    Cultural  Funding  Watch in  partnership  with Rambourg  Foundation  have  joined  with  various parties  of  the  Creative  and  Cultural  sector  around the  world  to  gather  their  knowledge  and experiences  of  best practices  in  the field,  to debate and  carry out an  inquiry  by  putting  into profit the technological and digital assets we have to communicate and connect in this time of physical disconnection, through an international virtual conference on March 20th.

    International Virtual Conference “Art Emergency Response Mechanisms: what can inspire us for the CC sector?’’

    Registration on this link: https://bit.ly/33tOovm

    This virtual  space  aims  to  gather  artists,   cultural  workers  and  creatives,  institutional representatives,  fund  initiators  where  they  could  share  their  best  practices  from  previous experiences on how to mobilize funds, exchange their know-how in handling crisis; making a clear  shift  of  our  attention  to  how  we  can  support  artists  and  audiences,  collaborators  and comrades, ideas and work, through present platforms and programs. The idea is to be a step ahead on an organizational level and find out how to best allocate our resources by  asking  the  right  questions. 

    Have a look at the Facebook Page here.

    Janelas de São Paulo

    The City of São Paulo, together with the Municipal Secretary of Culture, announced on 19 March the launch of a public notice for artistic production on the windows of buildings and houses in the city of São Paulo. The project will include around 8,000 initiatives, has a total budget of R $ 10 million and will cover theater, music and poetry, among other languages. 

    Called Janelas de São Paulo, the announcement also contemplates the availability of content produced on a virtual platform, so that residents can view the artistic production at any time. Information on the ceiling for resources allocated to each project, as well as the date on which registration begins, will be released soon, according to the secretariat.

    Have a look at the article here.

    Trickle Up NYC Artists Network

    Helping Those Affected by the COVID-19 Shutdowns.

    This platform has been created for independent NYC based artists. It is a subscription based service so artists can continue to create work and upload it to the website and receive some income for it.

    "This is an artists helping artists network. If we can get 10,000 subscribers at $10 a month, then every month we can give $10,000 to 10 different artists affected by the Covid-19 cancelations. And every month 10 new artists in need will get $10,000.  If we surpass our goal, more people will get help." (Trickle Up- NYC Artists Network)

    Find more information by looking at the website.

    Web Panel: Immunity of the arts

    This web panel, initiated by Master Performing Public Space, invites you to join a discussion about in dire need of compassion movie online possible impact of the current global health crisis (COVID-19) on artistic and cultural interventions in public space.

    What is the state of the arts field right now?
    How can the arts adapt to social behavioural changes?
    What is the future for public space as a 'shared space for engagement'?

    International Speakers:
    - Karen Cheung, Head Dance & Performing Arts, West Kowloon Cultural District 西九文化區, China
    - Ása Richardsdóttir, Secretary General, IETM Network, Belgium
    - Alessandro Carboni, Performer & Researcher, Italy
    - Bojana Panevska, Managing Editor & Educator, DutchCulture centre for international cooperation / TransArtists

    Moderated by Heleen de Hoon, Head Master Performing Public Space, The Netherlands

    Share your thoughts in a post panel Q&A.
    JOIN MEETING:
    https://us04web.zoom.us/s/893296418?pwd=Q0dpeWJvU3JiVlc4eTJDWUc4clhvdz09

    Have a look at the Facebook page !

    Creative Europe at Home

    The European Commission asks beneficiaries of the Creative Europe Programme to showcase their art work using #CreativeEuropeAtHome. 

    The European Commission has launched #CreativeEuropeAtHome – a social media campaign that is running on our Creative Europe accounts on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. With this, the European Commission is crowd sourcing the effort to highlight great online cultural activities throughout the Creative Europe community – available to culture lovers currently stuck at home.

    The European Commission asks beneficiaries that offer online cultural activities to post about it on social media. The posts should include the dedicated hashtag #CreativeEuropeAtHome and the handle/username of Creative Europe on the platform in question.

    The European Commission will share selected posts that adhere to these criteria on the Creative Europe official accounts. Commissioners Mariya Gabriel and Thierry Breton, will also give visibility on her Twitter account to these activities.

    Find more information here.

    The Australia Council for the Arts is hosting a series of First Nations' Roundtables for arts and creative independents, and organisations, to discuss the current situation that affects us all in relation to COVID-19.

    A weekly Roundtable enables people to connect, share and put forward ideas on how we navigate this period of the COVID-19 challenge.

    Join Chair of the First Nations Arts Strategy Panel, Wesley Enoch, and Executive Director, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Arts, Lydia Miller, in the third roundtable forum in an ongoing series of updates and discussions.

    You can register here for the next edition on 3 April.

    If you are interested contact [email protected]

    Have a look at previous roundtables here.

    Covid-19 Cultural and Creative Industries

    Covid-19 Culture and Creative Industries portal www.cci-covid19.org is an initiative of Nhimbe Trust, under Nhimbe Global Affairs Observatory. Through an innovative, responsive and proactive approach, the Observatory curates culture, arts and heritage oriented interventions in response to complex emergencies. Programming is targeted at countries / communities at risk of conflict, in conflict, engaged in post-conflict reconstruction, affected by natural disasters and impacted by political or socio-economic ‘crisis.’

    Mission Statement: To offer information resources, technical support and crisis response expertise, to the Cultural and Creative Industries ecosystem, for the strengthening of sector
    COVID-19 preparedness and response mechanisms.

    Have a look at the Facebook page here.

    To contribute to this information resource portal, email at [email protected] or reach
    the portal’s contact form.

    hireartists

    hireartists is a marketplace designed to facilitate creative exchange during an unprecedented economic crisis for the already-precarious arts and creative sector at large.

    Built by artists and for artists, hireartists connects buyers and supporters with experienced practitioners possessing decades of experience, for the purposes of online instruction or to help with creative and non-creative tasks.

    For artists, this is an opportunity to deploy their skills, diversify their income, and hopefully gain meaningful support, For everyone else, this is a moment where we can both help and use this moment of confinement as an opportunity to grow your world.

    hireartists takes no commission: your money will go straight to artists.

    Register Now!

    Have a look at the website here.

    Nowhere Online Platform - Music from here

    Nowhere Online Platform presents the third edition of the music album "Music from Here".

    The album, as in the previous two editions, includes a diverse mix of music genres that will be enjoyed by audience, critics and cultural managers in Egypt and the Arab world.

    During the previous two editions, the main purpose of the project was to present bands from within Alexandria, which the team tried to overcome and open up to modern musical works from all over Egypt to discover everything new that could not be envisaged, given the centrality of the musical movement in Egypt.

    The musical artworks presented in this edition do not represent the opinion of Platform but the views of its owners. This free product is intended to spread and publicize existing bands in action.

    Listen and download “Music from here - Third edition” Music album here !

    Universal Minutes

    Timely Art. Do take part! Capture your 17:21/5:21 pm wherever you are in the world.

    The team asks you to send them one photograph that you take at 17:21 from March 30- April 19. "A time when most of us would be finishing work. Or starting our journey home… But not now."

    They ask you to take as many photographs as you want at 17:21 / 5:21 pm And select just one each day and send it on to them: [email protected]

    "These are surreal times and we need to capture it in some personal way". 

    Random Scream (Davis Freeman & Sam Vanoverschelde) has been working on a project that was supposed to be in the Zsenne gallery during this week but they had to adapt. It’s a photography project where multiple photographers, artist and enthusiast synchrony bank cancelled my card take photographs during the same minute all over a city 5 days in a row.

    You have to send your name, a short three line Biography and an optional short text on the final day that might add some context to your vision over the days, to create a book/exhibition with all pictures at the end.

    Have a look at the Facebook page here !

    European Cultural Foundation

    European Cultural Foundation launches the Culture of Solidarity fund. 

    The European Cultural Foundation invites you to apply !

    The fund supports imaginative cultural initiatives that, in the midst of the global pandemic crisis reinforce European solidarity and the idea of Europe as a shared public space.

    All around the globe we see people reaching out to each other, practicing small and often imaginative human gestures of everyday solidarity, uniting us, across balconies, social networks, cities and countries. It is exactly this culture of solidarity the European Cultural Foundation has set out to capture and encourage. 

    Find all details, including the April 27 deadline, via https://www.culturalfoundation.eu/culture-of-solidarity. 

    UNO Fest Online

    UNO Fest, created by Intrepid Theatre has always pushed the boundaries of what solo performance can be. Facing this global pandemic, they are not able to gather in the theatre together and must keep their communities safe. They are not cancelling or postponing this year’s UNO Fest, instead they are working to bring UNO to your home with UNO Fest Online.

    Experience full shows online, interviews with the artists, video content from new shows in development, free streaming solo performances, and Facebook Happy Hours with artists and artistic staff.

    You can buy a ticket to access online shows and content for Week 1 or Week 2. Tickets are $10, $20 or $50 (which includes a $30 tax receipt). Once you buy a ticket, you will receive a code and link to unlock shows in that week of the festival. There will also be free online content on our Facebook Live throughout the festival. E

    Explore the calendar on their website. Have a look at the Facebook page!

    This festival is a Visual Art & Augmented Reality project of INFINI3, funded by the National Arts Council of In dire need of compassion movie online Africa, which showcases collaborative work by selected Free State based artists.

    The festival partnered with The Radioactive Blog, which hosted a 4 day hackathon with the 21 artists (and this group of artists consists of 7 poets, 7 visual/fine artists and 7 digital artists), from the 24th to the 27th of March 2020. Thuthukani Ndlovu was the facilitator of the hackathon.

    The artists were tasked with responding to the current Corona Virus Pandemic, therefore this is the main theme of the whole exhibition. In order to get the full experience of this exhibition, please download the Artivive App (available on iStore. Google Play for free) before entering the site. This Augmented Reality app will enable to scan each artwork in order listen to the poems and watch the AR video/pictures based on or inspired by each artwork. We will be sharing the link to the Online Exhibition here on this platform on the 9th of April at 12, so invite as many friends as possible.

    One of the amazing things about this online launch is that you can attend it from anywhere, as long as you got a Facebook account. We hope you enjoy the art we've created, and don't forget to share the Art and exhibition link with others. (Facebook event artwork by Tshepang Jiane, one of the selected visual artists).

    Have a look at the website  and the Facebook page here.

    Performance of Snapshots by Convergence Theatre: New Virtual Theatre about Islam, Sexuality, and Cultural Appropriation

    Convergence Theatre presented its virtual performance of by Asif Majid, livestreamed on the global, commons-based, peer-produced HowlRound TV network at howlround.tv on Friday March 27 2020 at 4 p.m. PDT (San Francisco, UTC-7) / 6 p.m. CDT (Chicago, UTC-5) / 7 p.m EDT (New York, UTC-4) / 11 p.m. GMT (London, UTC+0).

    Snapshots is the latest production in Convergence’s Incubation Cycle. This new and innovative dramatic text examines the intersection of Islam, sexuality, history, and cultural appropriation in an effort to foster open and supportive dialogue about these issues. Framed as a series of video and phone interactions between two couples, Snapshots delves into the struggles to embrace and communicate the multiple identities one can hold.

    As a result of public health concerns around COVID-19, Snapshots is being presented as an entirely virtual work -- no performer is in the same physical space as any other. Thus, this performance of Snapshots offers an opportunity for theatre-makers around the world to consider what virtual theatre can be, at a moment of self-reckoning for the field. Join Convergence for this experiment in virtual theatre, followed by a Converging Minds post-show discussion on Zoom led by Convergence’s Artistic Director Elena Velasco (accessible via this link immediately following the performance).

    Have a look at the performance on the website here (12:20) or on Youtube here.

    Tallin Music Week

    Conference from a Distance - Series of interviews with some of the foreseen conference speakers 2020

    Due to COVID-19, Tallinn Music Week 2020 and the Creative Impact Conference scheduled 25-29 March 2020 has been postponed to 26-30 August, but meanwhile they are sharing thoughts and experiences of this strange time by some of their brilliant conference speakers.

    The Talin Music Week team is now interviewing speakers who were supposed to take part into the Tallinn Music Week. They ask them how they feel about the situation, how they deal with it and how they understand it. You can click here to read more about this.

    Keith Nurse (Principal/President Sir Arthur Lewis Community College Morne Fortune, St. Lucia and Unesco Expert), The Festival Academy expert, was supposed to be a speaker for the Tallinn Music Week. He participated into this ‘conference from a distance’ through video in which he expressed his thoughts about the Covid-19 crisis and the impact and opportunities coming from it. Have a look at the full length video here.

    Safe Events

    Safe Events take a practical approach to Event Safety that makes your life easier and your attendees safer.

    They will be including details of upskilling / training opportunities that they know of that may be of interest to event professionals. They offer a list of Courses, FB Lives, Webinars and so on.

    You can get in touch and let them know of any opportunities you think should be included.  Email them at [email protected]

    Have a look at the website and the list here.

    Counterculture

    A free webinar from Countercultureon the post-Coronavirus opportunities for cultural organisations and artists

    Not knowing when the dawn will come, I open every door.” - Emily Dickinson

    On Tuesday 21 April, this free webinar will explore how the Covid-19 pandemic might affect society, the economy, politics, human interaction and artistic practice; examining how the arts and creative industries could find advantages amidst the challenges in the first 100 days after restrictions are lifted and in the longer term.

    Mark Ball (Creative Director, Manchester International Festival) is one of the previous experts of our Ateliers, he will be a speaker for this Webinar.

    Registrations are now closed !

    Have a look at the website here.

    In the view of the health and containment situation in many countries, the FAI-AR  (Higher Art Education in Public Space) has decided to re-open the MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) Create in public space.

    Registration and courses are open at least until 30 April 2020. Click here to access.

    What is public space? Why do artists choose to work in these unconventional places? How do they use these spaces around the world? What kinds of legislation and technical characteristics do professionals have to take into account?

    You can access this 4-week MOOC packed with tools and inspiration to help you understand and play a role in artistic creation in public space.

    As you progress through the course, you will learn about different artworks designed for public space, the way they interact with their locations, and the specific features of writing and audience relations in this context.

    You will be given methodological tools and practical exercises to help you try out these ideas and take on the role of a creator. You will get support from various European artists and professionals, who will share their experience and knowledge with you.

    Would you like to organize a training session before this date around Create in public space? Contact the team at [email protected]

    Get more information on the website.

    Follow Your Art

    Follow Your Art is a funding campaign to support artists and art workers hit by the covid-19 measures across European countries and beyond. Each funding cycle aims to provide 500 euros to 50 artists / art workers in 3 different countries, since art and solidarity don’t stop at the borders. The first cycle targets Belgium, Tunisia and Italy. The testimonials by artists and art workers applying for the support prove how urgent the support is needed: theatre and dance performances, concerts and exhibitions are cancelled world wide. Follow Your Art encourages people all over the world to make a donation from 5 euros onwards, and thus creates an international solidarity movement.

     Follow your Art is a non-profit designed to help support artists and art workers. It’s an initiative of Sana Ouchtati, supported by Ziad Erraiss and Eva Blaute.

    This initiative is two-sided:

    Per cycle we want to support 50 artists and art workers from 3 countries with 500 euros. The first cycle targets Belgium, Italy and Tunisia.

    Depending on your situation: register for the call as an artist / art worker, or donate to support artists and art workers who are left in an insecure situation.

    Like and share the fb-page here !

    Learn more about this initiative :

    https://www.follow-your-art.org/about-us/
    https://www.follow-your-art.org/call-for-artists/
    https://www.follow-your-art.org/donate/

    01 - 03 May 2020

    "We are Kukaya Festival, Malawi's third biggest music festival platform for local artists to nurture talent and earn a living through such art. We are raising funds to support our online festival dubbed Kukaya Social Distance Festival. Malawi's First ever Virtual Festival, with an aim of providing visual content and quality entertainment in the build-up, (throughout the month of April,) and during the Festival, slated for 1st - 3rd May 2020. 

    As a Festival that has also been affected by the pandemic, as many in our industry have, our main aim is to still continue to do what we love and share our art during this time, and what better time than whilst the world is in lockdown, to continue to provide entertainment to those staying home."

    They have collaborated on a collective call to action for social awareness on the ongoing Covid 19 global pandemic. The collaboration will consist of a multiple level content series, inclusive of four (4) main activations.

    Further support for Artists: Donations are open for all those interested to support our artists (who have all committed to performing pro bono,) on their gofundme page follow this link KukayaFest

    Have a look at the Facebook page here and at the website here.

    Have a look at the full presentation of the Kukaya Social Distance Festival !

    Episode 4: Arts in crisis: the role of creativity and the in dire need of compassion movie online in times of physical isolation

    Writer Ben Okri argues that in the crisis of this pandemic we need art more than ever. “We need art to remind us why life is worth living. …It is in the face of death that art becomes most powerful”

    However, the arts industry that includes artists and many more behind the scenes labour, came to a complete standstill before the lockdown. This has put many people in the arts sector in a precarious position.Art is often understood as being crucial to a sense of hope and well-being; to express resistance and to offer room for imagining alternatives. What are the opportunities and difficulties for artists to respond to this moment? How are arts-activists adapting to a world that is in isolation? What does the future hold for the arts?

    Mike van Graan Productions, Qondiswa James and Anele Selekwa will lead a conversation exploring what this moment means for artists and educators - what they're facing, how they're responding and what paths may lie ahead.

    Tuesday, 28 April 2020
    13:00 – 14:30

    Have a look at the website here.

    The webinar has been live streamed on their Facebook page

    This episode was part of a 5-part video education series on the Covid-19 crisis. More information about episode 5 will follow.

    Howlround Theatre Commons

    HowlRound TV is a global, commons-based peer produced, open access livestreaming and video archive project stewarded by the nonprofit HowlRound. HowlRound TV is a free and shared resource for live conversations and performances relevant to the world's performing arts and cultural fields. Its mission is to break geographic isolation, promote resource sharing, and to develop our knowledge commons collectively. Participate in a community of peer organizations revolutionizing the flow of information, knowledge, and access in our field by becoming a producer and co-producing with us.

    The Martin E. Segal Theatre Center presents SEGAL TALKS: Rimini Protokoll’s Daniel Wetzel, Helgard Haug, and Stefan Kaegi (Germany) live-streaming on the global, commons-based, peer-produced HowlRound TV network at howlround.tv on Monday 27 April 2020 at 9 a.m. PDT (San Francisco, UTC-7) / 11 a.m. CDT (Chicago, UTC-5) / 12 p.m. EDT (New York, UTC-4) / 17:00 BST (London, UTC+1) / 18:00 CEST (Berlin, UTC+2)

    SEGAL TALKS is a daily one-hour LIVE online conversation from Monday to Friday about making art and making sense in the Time of Corona.

    SEGAL TALKS was conceived, created and curated by Frank Hentschker in March 2020.

    SEGAL TALKS has been made possible by the support of Susan and Jack Rudin(†), the Hearst Foundation, and Marvin Carlson, Sidney E. Cohn Chair, The Graduate Center CUNY.

    Find more information here.

    Here is the Youtube page where you can see all livestreamings and Segal talks. Here you can see the past events and talks.

    Contagious cities

    The Cultural Research Network organises a global webinar on April 30 2020 - Contagious Cities: Facing and Understanding the Pandemic. Participants are invited to register for the zoom webinar.

    Are we ready to face the global challenge of Covid-19 pandemic outbreak? Do we know how microbes, migration and metropolises cohabitate or relate to each other? Can we tap into the artistic and cultural creativity to better understand the global infectious diseases or even investigate how they travel across urban and human borders?

    The webinar will raise and discuss these questions in a live conversation with artists, curators, researchers and cultural producers of the Contagious Cities. This international cultural project was developed by Wellcome Trust in 2018 to mark the centenary of the 1918 flu pandemic that infected a third of the world’s population and killed 50 million people. The VSG will share important insights from the Contagious Cities project, that brought together international curators, artists and scientists through residences across New York, Hong Kong and Geneva to explore how epidemics spread in urban environments.

    The webinar will be available via zoom. To register please visit here: https://contagious-cities.eventbrite.com

    Date & Time: April 30, 2020

    New York 8:30 AM / London 1:30 PM / Moscow 3:30 PM / Hong Kong 8:30 PM / Sydney 10:30 PM

    Contagious Cities was an international cultural project led by Wellcome which supported local conversations around the global challenges of epidemic preparedness. It ran from September 2018 to September 2019.

    Have a look at the website here.

    Zolani Mahola is among the artists using BUSQR.

    An online donation platform has been launched to help musicians and performers generate livestreaming income during the COVID-19 crisis

    BUSQR (pronounced ‘busker’) provides registered artists with a simple snap QR code that can be embedded into any live stream on Facebook, YouTube and Instagram.

    This allows fans to contribute funds to their favourite artists in real time while they perform live on social media. The platform also notifies artists if someone has contributed and allows fans to send a personal note to an artist. 

    “The uptake from artists from around the country has been phenomenal,” BUSQR founder and radio personality Jon Savage said. “It’s functionality has started to be noticed by other industries looking to connect with audiences in a different way. Some of my personal heroes are already using it regularly including the likes of Zolani Mahola, Arno Carstens and Rob van Vuuren.

    Savage’s partner at BUSQR, Jason Stewart, said: peoples united bank login ct also like to encourage any influencer who wants to raise donations during this period, as well as charities with ambassadors, to sign up with BUSQR to raise funds using a unique QR code. It’s the perfect mechanism.”

    BUSQR says it seeks to solve “a lot of the ‘pain-points’ for live performers like musicians, singers and comedians who have lost their income streams due to lockdown and social distancing protocols put in place by countries seeking to halt the coronavirus pandemic.”

    Interested artists can sign up with BUSQR here

    Have a look at the article here.

    ITALY- GREECE "RESTART PROJECT"

    Bibart - Bari International Art Biennial at this historic moment it is transformed into an international public art container for the promotion of artistic creation through technology and new media in collaboration with  Eye's Walk  Digital festival in Athens.

    The theme of the first edition of  Digital VideoArt festival is: “ITALY-  GREECE: "RESTART PROJECT”. A platform for contemporary video art and audio-visual performances.

    We passionately believe in Digital Arts, in the poetry they can provide to our life.This is the time for everyone to enjoy their  experimental and poetic  turn-of images, sounds and words.

    The selected works will be displayed  on the Bibart Biennale TV youtube channel  from May 9th until  September 12th 2020. From 5 to 12 September 2020, a week of live screenings will be scheduled at the Bibart Biennale exhibition site, located in Bari at the Church of Santa Teresa dei Maschi.

    Participation is free. Video art and performance videos, also in the form of a youtube link, must be sent by 7 May 2020 to: [email protected]

    For more info you can have a look at the Facebook page of BibartBiennale or Eyeswalk.

    Here are their Instagram accounts:  @eyeswalk_festival and @bibartbiennale

    Music from Here - Special edition "Time out"

    In response to the current conditions that the world is going through, and due to the outbreak of the Corona pandemic. Platform invites Arab musicians and bands residing in the Arab region and abroad to send their musical works that were produced during the global quarantine due to the pandemic, to exploit their use within the special volume of the music album "Music from Here" that is presented online to listen and download for free.

    At Nowhere online Music Platform, the team aspires to discover musical works produced by Arab musicians and their partners around the world, using different production techniques inside their homes and with different production possibilities.

    They do not aim to provide musical works that talk directly about the ban or infections or even Covid-19 around the world. but we seek to discover musical works that carry a good technical contribution that was done during that period and archiving those materials to allow reference to them someday in the future.

    The invitation is open to Arab artists residing in the Arab region and abroad and their partners around the world.

    • The bands or musicians chosen for the last selection will receive a payment for the use of the music product.
    • All works submitted for participation will be put on the Platform website for listening in addition to announcing them on social media.
    • The final selection process for the winning works will be carried out according to different stages (the best thirty music works from the audience’s selection and then the final selection of a music committee across the Arab world that includes directors, critics and musicians from the Arab world).
    • Applying for participation from 5th may 2020 to 5th June 2020
    • First selection June 15, 2020
    • Final selection June 30, 2020
    • All musical genres and shapes are welcome, while keeping these works at an acceptable level in recording and handling.

    You can apply through the following link: (link will be available 5th of may 2020)

    This work is supported by the Arab Fund for Arts and Culture 

    Have a look at the website here. To listen to previous releases of music from here

    1. First edition: https://www.nowhereonlineplatform.com/vol-1
    2. Second edition: https://www.nowhereonlineplatform.com/vol-2
    3. Third Edition: https://www.nowhereonlineplatform.com/vol-3

    In May 2020, TheatreWorks started its virtual programme in the form of a series of alternative training and a shared space in ZOOM led by Dr. Ong Keng Sen, one of the experts of The Festival Academy, for The Curators Academy. 

    He hold a series of 4 separate lectures to the wider public, together with consultations and clinics to train and share with a smaller group of participants. Ong says, “I will be lecturing and sharing my knowledge in a series known as “Curating No-thing.” 

    This thought leadership programme looked at activating one’s communities through art and rethinking our relationships with money and production. Many artists, writers, producers and cultural workers are already curating in their daily work but there is little reflection space for them to evaluate what is curating, how to curate, and for whom they should be curating for". 

    The series spanned topics such as Creating Worlds, Ethical Generosity, Rethinking Value, Small Actions and Listening.

    Date and Time:
    Lecture Series #1 - 19 May 2020, 7pm (SIN) / 11am (GMT) 
    Lecture Series #2 - 21 May 2020, 7pm (SIN) / 11am (GMT) 
    Lecture Series #3 - 26 May 2020, 7pm (SIN) / 11am (GMT) 
    Lecture Series #4 - 28 May 2020, 7pm (SIN) / 11am (GMT)

    If you have any questions or did not receive a link, please e-mail SOH Kai Ruo at [email protected]

    BOZAR at Home

    Anton Vanderhasselt is a Music Production Officer at BOZAR, Belgium. He was interviewed by Indian Dribble concerning his experience during the corona crisis.

    The team launched the “BOZAR at Home” online program that features the artistic and cultural diversity of BOZAR, offering live concerts, a virtual visit of the Keith Haring exhibition, singing workshops, sofa screenings, a selection of suggested literature during the crisis, and more. 

    It requires collaboration to set this up, for example with their artist in residence Avi Avital whose concert they had to cancel due to the lockdown. Luckily he was very flexible, and open to their suggestion of live streaming his concert via the BOZAR online network. In a weird way this situation brings them all closer together.

    Other than the online program that they offer on their website they are still perfecting their app. "For an institution like BOZAR it is imperative that the art we program reaches the public in one way or another, so these online solutions are important for us to keep in touch with our audience (and maybe reach a new one as well, two birds with one stone-wise)". The virtual tour of the Keith Haring expo is a perfect example of this.

    Have a look at the Bozar Website !

    You can also check the article by Indian Dribble here.

    Vrystaat Kunstefeed are offering conversations during the month of May.

    Next one is about Theatre for young audiences, presented by Yvette Hardie, one of the Experts of The Festival Academy.

    📅When





    1. Chloë Caro


    Sometimes credited as: Chloe Caro


    "In Dire Need of Compassion"



















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    Источник: https://www.erotic4u.eu/Chlo%C3%AB_Caro-nude-in-In-Dire-Need-of-Compassion-157504.htm

    (New York) – The International Olympic Committee’s (IOC) collaboration with Chinese authorities on tennis star Peng Shuai’s reappearance undermines its expressed commitment to human rights, including the rights and safety of athletes, Human Rights Watch said today.

    On November 21, 2021, the IOC said in a statement that its president, Thomas Bach, had a 30-minute video call with three-time Olympian Peng Shuai, joined by a Chinese sports official and an IOC official. The statement said that, during the call, Peng appeared to be “doing fine” and “relaxed,” and said she “would like to have her privacy respected.” The IOC did not explain how the video call with Peng had been organized, given the difficulties other concerned parties have had reaching her.

    “The IOC has vaulted itself from silence about Beijing’s abysmal human rights record to active collaboration with Chinese authorities in undermining freedom of speech and disregarding alleged sexual assault,” said Yaqiu Wang, senior China researcher at Human Rights Watch. “The IOC appears to prize its relationship with a major human rights violator over the rights and safety of Olympic athletes.”

    Meanwhile, the Chinese authorities have continued to impose a media and internet blackout of discussions of Peng’s case. Even words such as “tennis” and the surname “Peng” have been censored or shadow banned online.

    Peng, 35, went missing on November 2 after she said on Chinese social media that she had been in dire need of compassion movie online assaulted and forced into a sexual relationship with Zhang Gaoli, 75, who was China’s vice premier from 2013 to 2018.

    On November 18 the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) received a statement purporting to be from Peng, recanting her abuse claim. In response, the IOC said that it was “encouraged by assurance that she is safe.” On November 19 and 20, photos and videos of Peng appearing in her home, in a restaurant, and at a youth tennis event in Beijing emerged on Twitter accounts affiliated with government-run media. At the same time, Peng has not spoken directly with the media or the WTA.

    The authorities do not appear to have initiated an investigation into Peng’s complaint against Zhang. The IOC claims to be “actively taking steps to protect athletes from all forms of harassment and abuse in sport.” However, it has not said whether it has offered support to Peng concerning her sexual assault allegations.

    Since the #MeToo movement took off in China in early 2019, the authorities have censored victims of sexual harassment and harassed women’s rights activists. In September, Guangzhou police detained journalist and #MeToo activist Huang Xueqin on charges of “inciting subversion of state power.”

    The Chinese government forcibly disappears individuals whose views or conduct it sees as problematic, employs extralegal forms of detention and torture, and publishes forced confessions to make dubious cases appear legitimate. Chinese authorities have gone to great lengths to silence critics, including human rights lawyers, journalists, Nobel Peace Prize laureates, and Hong Kong publishers such as Swedish bookseller Gui Minhai. Other prominent people such as billionaire businessman Jack Ma, movie star Fan Bingbing, and Interpol chief Meng Hongwei have also been forcibly disappeared after running afoul of the authorities. After fleeing China or being released from detention, some former detainees recanted statements they were forced to make on camera.

    In contrast to the IOC’s response to Peng’s case, the WTA has repeatedly expressed concerns about Peng’s health and safety, called for an investigation into her complaint, and said it is prepared to pull tournaments out of China if it does not get an appropriate response. Reacting to the online videos of Peng and the IOC’s call, the WTA said “they don’t alleviate or address the WTA's concern about her well-being and ability to communicate without censorship or coercion.” World tennis champions including Novak Djokovic, Martina Navratilova, Naomi Osaka, and Serena Williams have also voiced concern about Peng’s safety.

    By cooperating with Chinese authorities in this video call, the IOC failed to adhere to its own human rights commitments and to protect the free expression rights of Olympic athletes, Human Rights Watch said. The IOC’s conduct also undermined the efforts by the WTA and other international sports organizations and individuals to secure Peng’s safety and freedom, and hold the Chinese government to account for human rights violations.

    In light of the Bach-Peng call, Human Rights Watch calls on the IOC to:

    • Retract its statement regarding the video call;
    • Explain publicly the circumstances surrounding the call and the statement, including any details of Chinese government involvement;
    • Urge the Chinese government to open an independent and transparent investigation into Peng’s allegations;
    • Urge the Chinese government to cease all censorship of reporting and discussions of Peng’s case; and
    • Urge the Chinese government to allow Peng to leave China if she so desires, and not retaliate against family members remaining in China.

    Human Rights Watch has previously called for the IOC to carry out human rights due diligence for the 2022 Beijing Winter Games. However, the IOC has given no indication that it has conducted or plans to publish a human rights risk assessment. The IOC has also not challenged Chinese authorities over their poor human rights record, including violations linked to the Olympics and crimes against humanity in Xinjiang.

    “If the IOC wants to credibly claim it’s a ‘force for good,’ it needs to stop participating in the Chinese government’s repressive practices,” Wang said. “The IOC should instead be standing up for human rights and the freedom and safety of athletes.”

    Источник: https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/11/22/olympics-dont-promote-chinese-state-propaganda

    The mindfulness conspiracy

    Mindfulness has gone mainstream, with celebrity endorsement from Oprah Winfrey and Goldie Hawn. Meditation coaches, monks and neuroscientists went to Davos to impart the finer points to CEOs attending the World Economic Forum. The founders of the mindfulness movement have grown evangelical. Prophesying that its hybrid of science and meditative discipline “has the potential to ignite a universal or global renaissance”, the inventor of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR), Jon Kabat-Zinn, has bigger ambitions than conquering stress. Mindfulness, he proclaims, “may actually be the only promise the species and the planet have for making it through the next couple of hundred years”.

    So, what exactly is this magic panacea? In 2014, Time magazine put a youthful blonde woman on its cover, blissing out above the words: “The Mindful Revolution.” The accompanying feature described a signature scene from the standardised course teaching MBSR: eating a raisin very slowly. “The ability to focus for a few minutes on a single raisin isn’t silly if the skills it requires are the keys to surviving and succeeding in the 21st century,” the author explained.

    But anything that offers success in our unjust society without trying to change it is not revolutionary – it just helps people cope. In fact, it could also be making things worse. Instead of encouraging radical action, mindfulness says the causes of suffering are disproportionately inside us, not in the political and economic frameworks that shape how we live. And yet mindfulness zealots believe that paying closer attention to the present moment without passing judgment has the revolutionary power to transform the whole world. It’s magical thinking on steroids.

    There are certainly worthy dimensions to mindfulness practice. Tuning out mental rumination does help reduce stress, as well as chronic anxiety and many other maladies. Becoming more aware of automatic reactions can make people calmer and potentially kinder. Most of the promoters of mindfulness are nice, and having personally met many of them, including the leaders of the movement, I have no doubt that their hearts are in the right place. But that isn’t the issue here. The problem is the product they’re selling, and how it’s been packaged. Mindfulness is nothing more than basic concentration training. Although derived from Buddhism, it’s been stripped of the teachings on ethics that accompanied it, as well as the liberating aim of dissolving attachment to a false sense of self while enacting compassion for all other beings.

    What remains is a tool of self-discipline, disguised as self-help. Instead of setting practitioners free, it helps them adjust to the very conditions that caused their problems. A truly revolutionary movement would seek to overturn this dysfunctional system, but mindfulness only serves to reinforce its destructive logic. The neoliberal order has imposed itself by stealth in the past few decades, widening inequality in pursuit of corporate wealth. People are expected to adapt to what this model demands of them. Stress has been pathologised and privatised, and the burden of managing it outsourced to individuals. Hence the pedlars of mindfulness step in to save the day.

    But none of this means that mindfulness ought to be banned, or that anyone who finds it useful is deluded. Reducing suffering is a noble aim and it should be encouraged. But to do this effectively, teachers of mindfulness need to acknowledge that personal stress also has societal causes. By failing to address collective suffering, and systemic change that might remove it, they rob mindfulness of its real revolutionary potential, reducing it to something banal that keeps people focused on themselves.

    The fundamental message of the mindfulness movement is that the underlying cause of dissatisfaction and distress is in our heads. By failing to pay attention to what actually happens in each moment, we get lost in regrets about the past and fears for the future, which make us unhappy. Kabat-Zinn, who is often labelled the father of modern mindfulness, calls this a “thinking disease”. Learning to focus turns down the volume on circular thought, so Kabat-Zinn’s diagnosis is that our “entire society is suffering from attention deficit disorder – big time”. Other sources of cultural malaise are not discussed. The only mention of the word “capitalist” in Kabat-Zinn’s book Coming to Our Senses: Healing Ourselves and the World Through Mindfulness occurs in an anecdote about a stressed investor who says: “We all suffer a kind of ADD.”

    Mindfulness advocates, perhaps unwittingly, are providing support for the status quo. Rather than discussing how attention is monetised and manipulated by corporations such as Google, Facebook, Twitter and Apple, they locate the crisis in our minds. It is not the nature of the capitalist system that is inherently problematic; rather, it is the failure of individuals to be mindful and resilient in a precarious and uncertain economy. Then they sell us solutions that make us contented, mindful capitalists.

    By practising mindfulness, individual freedom is supposedly found within “pure awareness”, undistracted by external corrupting influences. All we need to do is close our eyes and watch our breath. And that’s the crux of the supposed revolution: the world is slowly changed, one mindful individual at a time. This political philosophy is oddly reminiscent of George W Bush’s “compassionate conservatism”. With the retreat to the private sphere, mindfulness becomes a religion of the self. The idea of a public sphere is being eroded, and any trickledown effect of compassion is by chance. As a result, notes the political theorist Wendy Brown, “the body politic ceases to be a body, but is, rather, a group of individual entrepreneurs and consumers”.

    Mindfulness, like positive psychology and the broader happiness industry, has depoliticised stress. If we are unhappy about being unemployed, losing our health insurance, and seeing our children incur massive debt through college loans, it is our responsibility to learn to be more mindful. Kabat-Zinn assures us that “happiness is an inside job” that simply requires us to attend to the present moment mindfully and purposely without judgment. Another vocal promoter of meditative practice, the neuroscientist Richard Davidson, contends that “wellbeing is a skill” that can be trained, like working out one’s biceps at the gym. The so-called mindfulness revolution meekly accepts the dictates of the marketplace. Guided by a therapeutic ethos aimed at enhancing the mental and emotional resilience of individuals, it endorses neoliberal assumptions that everyone is free to choose their responses, manage negative emotions, and “flourish” through various modes of self-care. Framing what they offer in this way, most teachers of mindfulness rule out a curriculum that critically engages with causes of suffering in the structures of power and economic systems of capitalist society.


    The term “McMindfulness” was coined by Miles Neale, a Buddhist teacher and psychotherapist, who described “a feeding frenzy of spiritual practices that provide immediate nutrition but no long-term sustenance”. The contemporary mindfulness fad is the entrepreneurial equal of McDonald’s. The founder of McDonald’s, Ray Kroc, created the fast food industry. Very early on, when he was selling milkshakes, Kroc spotted the franchising potential of a restaurant chain in San Bernadino, California. He made a deal to serve as the franchising agent for the McDonald brothers. Soon afterwards, he bought them out, and grew the chain into a global empire. Kabat-Zinn, a dedicated meditator, had a vision in the midst of a retreat: he could adapt Buddhist teachings and practices to help hospital patients deal with physical pain, stress and anxiety. His masterstroke was the branding of mindfulness as a secular spirituality.

    Kroc saw his chance to provide busy Americans with instant access to food that would be delivered consistently through automation, standardisation and discipline. Kabat-Zinn perceived the opportunity to give stressed-out Americans easy access to MBSR through an eight-week mindfulness course for stress reduction that would be taught consistently using a standardised curriculum. MBSR teachers would gain certification by attending programmes at Kabat-Zinn’s Center for Mindfulness in Worcester, Massachusetts. He continued to expand the reach of MBSR by identifying new markets such as corporations, schools, government and the military, and endorsing other forms of “mindfulness-based interventions” (MBIs).

    Both men took measures to ensure that their products would not vary in quality or content across franchises. Burgers and fries at McDonald’s are the same whether one is eating them in Dubai or in Dubuque. Similarly, there is little variation in the content, structuring and curriculum of MBSR courses around the world.

    Mindfulness has been oversold and commodified, reduced to a technique for just about any instrumental purpose. It can give inner-city kids a calming time-out, or hedge-fund traders a mental edge, or reduce the stress of military drone pilots. Void of a moral compass or ethical commitments, unmoored from a vision of the social good, the commodification of mindfulness keeps it anchored in the ethos of the market.

    This has come about partly because proponents of mindfulness believe that the practice is apolitical, and so the avoidance of moral inquiry and the reluctance to consider a vision of the social good are intertwined. It is simply assumed that ethical behaviour will arise “naturally” from practice and the teacher’s “embodiment” of soft-spoken niceness, or through the happenstance of self-discovery. However, the claim that major ethical changes will follow from “paying attention to the present moment, non-judgmentally” is patently flawed. The emphasis on “non-judgmental awareness” can just as easily disable one’s moral intelligence.

    In Selling Spirituality: The Silent Takeover of Religion, Jeremy Carrette and Richard King argue that traditions of Asian wisdom have been subject to colonisation in dire need of compassion movie online commodification since the 18th century, producing a highly individualistic spirituality, perfectly accommodated to dominant cultural values and requiring no substantive change in lifestyle. Such an individualistic spirituality is clearly linked with the neoliberal agenda of privatisation, especially when masked by the ambiguous language used in mindfulness. Market forces are already exploiting the momentum of the mindfulness movement, reorienting its goals to a highly circumscribed individual realm.

    Mindfulness is easily co-opted and reduced to merely “pacifying feelings of anxiety and disquiet at the individual level, rather than seeking to challenge the social, political and economic inequalities that cause such distress”, write Carrette and King. But a commitment to this kind of privatised and psychologised mindfulness is political – therapeutically optimising individuals to make them “mentally fit”, attentive and resilient, so they may keep functioning within the system. Such capitulation seems like the farthest thing from a revolution – more like a quietist surrender.

    Mindfulness is positioned as a force that can help us cope with the noxious influences of capitalism. But because what it offers is so easily assimilated by the market, its potential for social and political transformation is neutered. Leaders in the mindfulness movement believe that capitalism and spirituality can be reconciled; they want to relieve the stress of individuals without having to look deeper and more broadly at its causes.

    Mindfulness is being sold to executives as a way to de-stress, focus and bounce back from working 80-hour weeks

    A truly revolutionary mindfulness would challenge the western sense of entitlement to happiness irrespective of ethical conduct. However, mindfulness programmes do not ask executives to examine how their managerial decisions and corporate policies have institutionalised greed, ill will and delusion. Instead, the practice is being sold to executives as a way to de-stress, improve productivity and focus, and bounce back from working 80-hour weeks. They may well be “meditating”, but it works like taking an aspirin for a headache. Once the pain goes away, it is business as usual. Even if individuals become nicer people, the corporate agenda of maximising profits does not change.

    If mindfulness just helps people cope with the toxic conditions that make them stressed in the first place, then perhaps we could aim a bit higher. Should we celebrate the fact that this perversion is helping people to “auto-exploit” themselves? This is the core of the problem. The internalisation of focus for mindfulness practice also leads to other things being internalised, from corporate requirements to structures of dominance in society. Perhaps worst of all, this submissive position is framed as freedom. Indeed, mindfulness thrives on doublespeak about freedom, celebrating self-centered “freedoms” while paying no attention to civic responsibility, or the cultivation of a collective mindfulness that finds genuine freedom within a co-operative and just society.

    Of course, reductions in stress and increases in personal happiness and wellbeing are much easier to sell than serious questions about injustice, inequity and environmental devastation. The latter involve a challenge to the social order, while the former play directly to mindfulness’s priorities – sharpening people’s focus, improving their performance at work and in exams, and even promising better sex lives. Not only has mindfulness been repackaged as a novel technique of psychotherapy, but its utility is commercially marketed as self-help. This branding reinforces the notion that spiritual practices are indeed an individual’s private concern. And once privatised, these practices are easily co-opted for social, economic and political control.

    Rather than being used as a means to awaken individuals and organisations to the unwholesome roots of greed, ill will and delusion, mindfulness is more often refashioned into a banal, therapeutic, self-help technique that can actually reinforce those roots.


    Mindfulness is said to be a $4bn industry. More than 60,000 books for sale on Amazon have a variant of “mindfulness” in their title, touting the benefits of Mindful Parenting, Mindful Eating, Mindful Teaching, Mindful Therapy, Mindful Leadership, Mindful Finance, a Mindful Nation, and Mindful Dog Owners, to name just a few. There is also The Mindfulness Colouring Book, part of a bestselling subgenre in itself. Besides books, there are workshops, online courses, glossy magazines, documentary films, smartphone apps, bells, cushions, bracelets, beauty products and other paraphernalia, as well as a lucrative and burgeoning conference circuit. Mindfulness programmes have made their way into schools, Wall Street and Silicon Valley corporations, law firms, and government agencies, including the US military.

    The presentation of mindfulness as a market-friendly palliative explains its warm reception in popular culture. It slots so neatly into the mindset of the workplace that its only real threat to the status quo is to offer people ways to become more skilful at the rat race. Modern society’s neoliberal consensus argues that those who enjoy power and wealth should be given free rein to accumulate more. It’s perhaps no surprise that those mindfulness merchants who accept market logic are a hit with the CEOs in Davos, where Kabat-Zinn has no qualms about preaching the gospel of competitive advantage from meditative practice.

    Over the past few decades, neoliberalism has outgrown its conservative roots. It has hijacked public discourse to the extent that even self-professed progressives, such as Kabat-Zinn, think in neoliberal terms. Market values have invaded every corner of human life, defining how most of us are forced to interpret and live in the world.

    Perhaps the most straightforward definition of neoliberalism comes from the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu, who calls it “a programme for destroying collective structures that may impede the pure market logic”. We are generally conditioned to think that a market-based society provides us with ample (if not equal) opportunities for increasing the value of our “human capital” and self-worth. And in order to fully actualise personal freedom and potential, we need to maximise our own welfare, freedom, and happiness by deftly managing internal resources.

    Since competition is so central, neoliberal ideology holds that all decisions about how society is run should be left to the workings of the marketplace, the most efficient mechanism for allowing competitors to maximise their own good. Other social actors – including the state, voluntary associations, and the like – are just obstacles to the smooth operation of market logic.

    For an actor in neoliberal society, mindfulness is a skill to be cultivated, or a resource to be put to use. When mastered, it helps you to navigate the capitalist ocean’s tricky currents, keeping your attention “present-centred and non-judgmental” to deal with the inevitable stress and anxiety from competition. Mindfulness helps you to maximise your personal wellbeing.

    All of this may help you to sleep better at night. But the consequences for society are potentially dire. The Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek has analysed this trend. As he sees it, mindfulness is “establishing itself as the hegemonic ideology of global capitalism”, by helping people “to fully participate in the capitalist dynamic while retaining the appearance of mental sanity”.

    By deflecting attention from the social structures and material conditions in a capitalist culture, mindfulness is easily co-opted. Celebrity role models bless and endorse it, while Californian companies including Google, Facebook, Twitter, Apple and Zynga have embraced it as an adjunct to their brand. Google’s former in-house mindfulness tsar Chade-Meng Tan had the actual job title Jolly Good Fellow. “Search inside yourself,” he counselled colleagues and readers – for there, not in corporate culture – lies the source of your problems.

    The rhetoric of “self-mastery”, “resilience” and “happiness” assumes wellbeing is simply a matter of developing a skill. Mindfulness cheerleaders are particularly fond of this trope, saying we can train our brains to be happy, like exercising muscles. Happiness, freedom and wellbeing become the products of individual effort. Such so-called “skills” can be developed without reliance on external factors, relationships or social conditions. Underneath its therapeutic discourse, mindfulness subtly reframes problems as the outcomes of choices. Personal troubles are never attributed to political or pier one credit card payment center conditions, but are always psychological in nature and diagnosed as pathologies. Society therefore needs therapy, not radical change. This is perhaps why mindfulness initiatives have become so attractive to government policymakers. Societal problems rooted in inequality, racism, poverty, addiction and deteriorating mental health can be reframed in terms of individual psychology, requiring therapeutic help. Vulnerable subjects can even be told to provide this themselves.


    Neoliberalism divides the world into winners and losers. It accomplishes this task through its ideological linchpin: the individualisation of all social phenomena. Since the autonomous (and free) individual is the primary focal point for society, social change is achieved not through political protest, organising and collective action, but via the free market and atomised actions of individuals. Any effort to change this through collective structures is generally troublesome to the neoliberal order. It is therefore discouraged.

    An illustrative example is the practice of recycling. The real problem is the mass production of plastics by corporations, and their overuse in retail. However, consumers are led to believe that being personally wasteful is the underlying issue, which can be fixed if they change their habits. As a recent essay in Scientific American scoffs: “Recycling plastic is to saving the Earth what hammering a nail is to halting a falling skyscraper.” Yet the neoliberal doctrine of individual responsibility has performed its sleight-of-hand, distracting us from the real culprit. This is far from new. In the 1950s, the “Keep America Beautiful” campaign urged individuals to pick up their trash. The project was bankrolled by corporations such as Coca-Cola, Anheuser-Busch and Phillip Morris, in partnership with the public service announcement Ad Council, which coined the term “litterbug” to shame miscreants. Two decades later, a famous TV ad featured a Native American man weeping at the sight of a motorist dumping garbage. “People Start Pollution. People Can Stop It,” was the slogan. The essay in Scientific American, by Matt Wilkins, sees through such charades.

    To change the world, we are told to work on ourselves – to change our minds by being more accepting of circumstances

    At face value, these efforts seem benevolent, but they obscure the real problem, which is the role that corporate polluters play in the plastic problem. This clever misdirection has led journalist and author Heather Rogers to describe Keep America Beautiful as the first corporate greenwashing front, as it has helped shift the public focus to consumer recycling behaviour and thwarted legislation that would increase extended producer responsibility for waste management.

    We are repeatedly sold the same message: that individual action is the only real way to solve social problems, so we should take responsibility. We are trapped in a neoliberal trance by what the education scholar Henry Giroux calls a “disimagination machine”, because it stifles critical and radical thinking. We are admonished to look inward, and to manage ourselves. Disimagination impels us to abandon creative ideas about new possibilities. Instead of seeking to dismantle capitalism, or rein in its excesses, we should accept its demands and use self-discipline to be more effective in the market. To change the world, we are told to work on ourselves — to change our minds by being more mindful, nonjudgmental, and accepting of circumstances.

    It is a fundamental tenet of neoliberal mindfulness, that the source of people’s problems is found in their heads. This has been accentuated by the pathologising and medicalisation of stress, which then requires a remedy and expert treatment – in the form of mindfulness interventions. The ideological message is that if you cannot alter the circumstances causing distress, you can change your reactions to your circumstances. In some ways, this can be helpful, since many things are not in our control. But to abandon all efforts to fix them seems excessive. Mindfulness practices do not permit critique or debate of what might be unjust, culturally toxic or environmentally destructive. Rather, the mindful imperative to “accept things as they are” while practising “nonjudgmental, present moment awareness” acts as a social anesthesia, preserving the status quo.

    The mindfulness movement’s promise of “human flourishing” (which is also the rallying cry of positive psychology) is the closest it comes to defining a vision of social change. However, this vision remains individualised and depends on the personal choice to be more mindful. Mindfulness practitioners may of course have a very different political agenda to that of neoliberalism, but the risk is that they start to retreat into their own private worlds and particular identities — which is just where the neoliberal power structures want them.

    Mindfulness practice is embedded in what Jennifer Silva calls the “mood economy”. In Coming Up Short: Working-Class Adulthood in an Age of Uncertainty, Silva explains that, like the privatisation of risk, a mood economy makes “individuals solely responsible for their emotional fates”. In such a political economy of affect, emotions are regulated as a means to enhance one’s “emotional in dire need of compassion movie online. At Google’s Search Inside Yourself mindfulness programme, emotional intelligence (EI) figures prominently in the curriculum. The programme is marketed to Google engineers as instrumental to their career success — by engaging in mindfulness practice, managing emotions generates surplus economic value, equivalent to the acquisition of capital. The mood economy also demands the ability to bounce back from setbacks to stay productive in a precarious economic context. Like positive psychology, the mindfulness movement has merged with the “science of happiness”. Once packaged in this way, it can be sold as a technique for personal life-hacking optimisation, disembedding individuals from social worlds.

    All the promises of mindfulness resonate with what the University of Chicago cultural theorist Lauren Berlant calls “cruel optimism”, a defining neoliberal characteristic. It is cruel in that one makes affective investments in what amount to fantasies. We are told that if we practice mindfulness, and get our individual lives in order, we can be happy and secure. It is therefore implied that stable employment, home ownership, social mobility, career success and equality will naturally follow. We are also promised that we can gain self-mastery, controlling our minds and emotions so we can thrive and flourish amid the vagaries of capitalism.As Joshua Eisen, the author of Mindful Calculations, puts it: “Like kale, acai berries, gym memberships, vitamin water, and other new year’s resolutions, mindfulness indexes a profound desire to change, but one premised on a fundamental reassertion of neoliberal fantasies of self-control and unfettered agency.” We just have to sit in silence, watching our breath, and wait. It is doubly cruel because these normative fantasies of the “good life” are already crumbling under neoliberalism, and we make it worse if we focus individually on our feelings. Neglecting shared vulnerabilities and interdependence, we disimagine the collective ways we might bank of america free checking ourselves. And despite the emptiness of nurturing fantasies, we continue to cling to them.

    Mindfulness isn’t cruel in and of itself. It’s only cruel when fetishised and attached to inflated promises. It is then, as Berlant points out, that “the object that draws your attachment actively impedes the aim that brought you to it initially”. The cruelty lies in supporting the status quo while using the language of transformation. This is how neoliberal mindfulness promotes an individualistic vision of human flourishing, enticing us to accept things as they are, mindfully enduring the ravages of capitalism.

    Adapted from McMindfulness: How Mindfulness Became the New Capitalist Spirituality by Ronald Purser, published by Repeater Books on 9 July and available at guardianbookshop.com

    Follow the Long Read on Twitter at @gdnlongread, and sign up to the long read weekly email here.

    Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/jun/14/the-mindfulness-conspiracy-capitalist-spirituality

    Coming Attractions: November 29 Through December 12 — What Will Light Your Fire

    Compiled by Bill Marx

    As the age of Covid-19 wanes (or waxes?), Arts Fuse critics supply a guide to film, dance, visual art, theater, and music. Please check with venues about whether the event is available by streaming or is in person. More offerings will be added as they come in.

    Film

    Prism
    November 29

    A Docyard Series presentation. Racism is deeply entrenched in our film culture in many ways, including its technical assumptions. For example, the lighting for movie cameras has traditionally been calibrated for white skin. Other production tools also reflect cinema’s racial prejudices. Three filmmakers explore the literal, theoretical, and philosophical dimensions of this history in a discursive, playful, and profound work of nonfiction that takes the form of a series of provocative and thematically linked discussions and interrogations.

    Luzzu
    through December 1
    Brattle Theater, Cambridge

    This stunning film from Malta, which played IFFBoston and Sundance, is a human drama shot in a neorealist style. Fisherman Jesmark, spends his days struggling at his trade — the fish are few and money is tight. He is a proud man with a colorful luzzu, a hand-painted wooden fishing boat that’s been passed down through the generations. When his infant son requires medical attention he is forced to compromise time-honored principles. A riveting study of Old World values pit against the realities of the modern world. Trailer

    Artificial Gamer
    Coolidge Corner Theatre
    December 2 at 7 p.m.

    A passionate team of engineers from the company OpenAI is challenged to develop an artificial intelligence capable of defeating the World Champions of DOTA 2, a video game more complex than anything attempted by AI in the past — and given only one year to do it. The outcome could alter the way we think about advanced AI systems. Q&A with filmmaker Chad Herschberger, producer Jennifer 8. Lee, and film subjects

    Wood and Water
    Coolidge Corner Theatre
    December 5 at 1:30 p.m.

    The Goethe Institute presentation. Anke retires from her job at a church in rural Black Forest in order to to reunite with her children who are living near the Baltic Sea. They had been together there, happily, as a young family. Her son Max is unable to join them because of protests in Hong Kong. She has been out of touch with him for many years and after an otherwise uneventful summer, spent in nostalgia and facing the void of retirement, she decides to visit him. A mother wants to check in on her children every now and then, but Hong Kong is also her adventure, her escape. The Goethe Institute presentation.

    Reviewed on The Arts Fuse and Currently Playing

    C’Mon C’Mon reviewed by Erica Abeel
    Belfast reviewed by Ezra Haber Glenn
    The Power of the Dog reviewed by Tim Jackson
    The Electrical Life of Louis Wain reviewed by Peg Aloi
    Karen Dalton: In My Own Time reviewed by Ed Symkus

    — Tim Jackson


    Theater

    COVID PROTOCOLS: Check with specific theaters: requirements often include proof of vaccination or a negative Covid-19 rapid test. Also, companies are requiring masks at indoor performances.

    The Alchemist by Ben Jonson. Adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher. Directed by Jesse Berger. Staged by Red Bull Theater at New World Stages, 340 West 50th Street, New York, New York, through December 19.

    Jonsonians rejoice! A chance to see (an adaptation) of the 1610 script, first performed by the King’s Men, that Samuel Taylor Coleridge considered to have one of the three most perfect plots in literature. Has anything changed? Bullies of all description still fleece each other during plague time. “When a wealthy gentleman flees to the country, his trusted servant opens his house to a pair of con artists who set up an animated den of criminal capitalism. Claiming alchemical powers, the quick-witted trio fleece an onslaught of greedy sheep with their miraculous ability to improvise amidst increasingly frantic comings and goings. It’s comic gold with dupes, double-dupes, duels, disguises, and a lucky flea named ‘Lewis.'”

    I hope Hatcher didn’t get rid of one of Jonson’s great jokes. Lovewit, panicked member of the upper-middle class, returns home to London once he believes it is safe, but he is wary. (He has kept his distance “While there dies one, a week, / O’ the plague.” Some claimed that corrupted human breath could transmit the disease, which explains Lovewit’s nervous instructions to a servant (who insists he has not been ill) to “Breathe less, and further off.” Jonson knew that the audience members at the show, hearing that line, would look nervously at those seated around them. The plague was not entirely gone in 1610.

    White Rabbit Red Rabbit by Nassim Soleimanpour. An online event presented by Arts Emerson, Rooting for you meaning 7 through 12.

    “This contemporary piece features a different actor each night who reads the play for the first time in front of a live virtual audience. From there the actor gives their interpretation of the words of Iranian dramatist Nassim Soleimanpour — resulting in a theatrical experience that can never be replicated. Soleimanpour wrote White Rabbit Red Rabbit in 2010 while he was forbidden from leaving his home country because of his refusal to participate in military service. The play dissects power in a wild, truly original structure, pairing the experience of isolation with daring, unexpected comedy. A new actor will open the script in front of a live virtual audience for the first and last time during the play’s run at ArtsEmerson; in total, six actors will perform the piece as part of this engagement.”

    Theater of War: Institute for Veterans and MilitaryFamilies, an online event, December 7.

    “Theater of War is an innovative public health project that presents readings of scenes from ancient Greek plays as a catalyst for guided discussions about the challenges faced by service members, veterans, and their families. Using Sophocles’ Ajax –an ancient play about the suicide of a great, respected warrior—to forge a common vocabulary for openly discussing the visible and invisible wounds of war, these events are aimed at generating compassion and understanding between diverse audiences.”

    “This special presentation is being co-presented by the Institute for Veterans and Military Families (IVMF) at Syracuse University as part of their Syracuse Serves initiative and is open to the public.”

    Featuring performances by Taylor Schilling, David Strathairn, David Denman, Nyasha Hatendi, Marjolaine Goldsmith (Company Manager of Theater of War Productions), Jumaane Williams (Public Advocate of New York City), and Bryan Doerries.

    The Last Five Years, written and composed by Jason Robert Brown. Directed by Leigh Barrett. Musical direction by Dan Rodriguez. Staged by the Lyric Stage Company at 140 Clarendon Street, Boston, through December 12.

    “There are always two sides to every story; the story depends on who is telling it. This is an emotionally powerful and intimate musical about two New Yorkers in their twenties who fall in and out of love over the course of five years. The show’s unconventional structure consists of Cathy telling her story backwards while Jamie tells his story chronologically.” Arts Fusereview

    The Half-Life of Marie Curie by Lauren Gunderson. Directed by Bryn Boice. Produced by The [email protected] Square Theater (A Catalyst [email protected] Production) at Central Square Theater, Cambridge, through December 12.

    The plot: “Summer, 1912. Two-time Nobel Prize winner Marie Curie takes refuge with her friend Hertha Aryton, renowned mechanical engineer, after the outing of Marie’s scandalous affair with the married Paul Langevin.” This two-hander dramatizes their “deep friendship, their struggles with double standards, the danger of discoveries, and their passion for science and family.” Considerable theatrical radiance will no doubt be supplied by the casting of vets Lee Mikeska Gardner and Underground Railway’s Debra Wise. Arts Fusereview

    The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Directed by Danielle Fauteux Jacques. Staged by the Apollinaire Theatre Company at the Chelsea Theatre Works 189 Winnisimmet Street, Chelsea, MA, through December 19.

    A revival of an Apollinaire Theatre Company production of Wilde’s comedy. That new version contains 4 of the 8 original actors “taking over all the roles!”

    The Rise and Fall of Holly Fudge by Trista Baldwin. Directed by Courtney Sale. Staged by the Merrimack Repertory Theatre at Liberty Hall, 50 East Merrimack Street, Lowell, MA, through December 12. Video on Demand: December 16-26

    The world premiere of a very relevant holiday comedy (which takes place during the pandemic!) commissioned by Merrimack Rep. “Christmas 2020. Carol is a hard-working single mother who makes award-winning “Holly” fudge, named after her daughter. She serves it every holiday. She gifts it to her friends and co-workers. She’s determined that this year won’t be any different, even if she has to wear a dovenmuehle mortgage bill payment while whipping up her famous dessert. But with her daughter Holly’s girlfriend crashing Christmas, her neighbor’s new-found love of confectionery, and the protests erupting on her front lawn, Carol is finding it tough to make this the most wonderful time of year.”

    Witness by Nana Grinstein with Blair Cadden & Igor Golyak. Conceived and directed by Igor Golyak. Scenography & Costume Design by Anna Fedorova. Produced by Sara Stackhouse Featuring the Arlekin Acting Company. Staged by Arlekin Players Theatre and Zero Gravity (zero-G) Virtual Theater Lab, a live virtual offering that will include a post-show talkback with members of the cast and creative team, December 10 through January 23, 2022.

    The world premiere of  “a new documentary theater piece about Jewish immigration in the face of antisemitism.” The play “brings actors and audience together from around the world for a shared immersive experience set on a boat in digital space.  The piece is inspired by the journey of the MS St. Louis, which left Hamburg in 1939 with over 900 Jewish people on board and headed to Cuba only to be turned away, leaving the passengers stranded with nowhere to go and no escape.” The play “shares stories of Jewish immigrants from around the globe through an interactive virtual theater experience at the nexus of film, theater and video games.”

    Incels and Other Myths by Ally Sass. Directed by Erica Terpening-Romeo. A BU New Play Initiative production, produced by Boston Playwrights’ Theatre and the Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Theatre at the Boston Playwrights Theatre, 949 Commonwealth Ave., Boston, December 2 through 12.

    “The drama journeys into the online realms of gender, power and mythology when Elaine, a teacher of Women in Mythology, grows concerned when son Avery spends much of his time playing the online adventure game Oracle, involving himself in the notorious, misogynistic “incel” community. Through their descent into fraught online territory, Avery and Elaine discover unexpected and intoxicating new realities that shape how they see their own worlds.

    Teenage Dickby Mike Lew. Directed by Moritz bbva business credit card login Stuelpnagel. Staged by the Huntington Theatre Company at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, Boston, December 2 through January 2, 2022 (with digital access to the filmed performance through January 16, 2022). The production is produced in association with Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company (Washington, DC) and Pasadena Playhouse (Pasadena, CA). The play originated at Ma-Yi Theatre Company (New York, NY) in association with The Public Theater (New York, NY).

    This adaption of Shakespeare Richard III “centers on a high school outsider named Richard. Bullied because of his cerebral palsy, Richard decides to exact revenge on his class enemies by becoming the senior class president. But all the scheming, manipulation, and revenge plots force him to ask the age-old question: is it better to be loved or feared?”

    — Bill Marx


    Rock

    A tradition returns, as the Tedeschi Trucks Band performs its final shows of the year at a four-night residency at the Orpheum Theater in Boston starting Nov. 30. Tickets for that two-set “evening with” show and for the Dec. 1 concert with opener Miko Marks remain. The two-set concerts on Dec. 3 and 4 are sold out.

    The pandemic put the kibosh on the residency last year, and it’s only been a few months now since the full-strength Tedeschi Trucks Band has been back in business. Guitar mavens and band leaders Derek Trucks and Norwell native Susan Tedeschi led a scaled-down version of the troupe for a run of summer concerts, which proved to be a very satisfying alternative.

    Yet when the whole 12-member-strong TTB took the stage at New York City’s Beacon Theater for a seven-night run earlier this fall, it was a joyous explosion of music, with the full horn section and all of the backing vocalists elevating the proceedings. The band’s new drummer, Isaac Eady, has also seamlessly woven his talents into the group alongside co-drummer Tyler Greenwell.

    If past years of the Orpheum residency prove anything, expect TTB to leave it all on the stage — the 2019 three-night residency, for instance, featured 61 unique songs with no repeats — before the band members head home for the holidays.

    — Scott McLennan


    Roots and World Music

    Warren Ertle’s Hot Peppers with special guest Vince Giordano
    November 30
    Crystal Ballroom, Somerville Theater

    The Somerville Theater’s new upstairs venue has been dedicating Tuesday to the kind of swing dances that might have been presented when the ballroom was first in use decades ago. Pianist Warren Ertle, a student of the Jelly Roll Morton approach, will be leading a band that includes bassist Vince Giordano, whose Nighthawks are the longtime kings of the New York vintage jazz scene.

    Matt Flinner and Low Lily
    December 8
    Club Passim, Cambridge

    The music calendar is chock full of holiday shows. One of the more enticing, low-key options is this Solstice-themed night of roots and bluegrass from veteran superpicker Flinner in combination with Low Lily, an aggregation of three of New England’s beloved acoustic singers and players: Lissa Schneckenburger (vocals, fiddle), Liz Simmons (vocals, guitar), and Flynn Cohen (vocals, guitar, mandolin) .

    — Noah Schaffer


    Dance

    KAIROS at Medicine Wheel
    November 30, 11:59 p.m.
    Boston Center for the Arts, Boston

    Produced annually since 1992, Medicine Wheel is the largest recurring site-specific public art event in Boston. It is led by visual artist Michael Dowling and presented in the historic Cyclorama at Boston Center for the Arts. KAIROS Dance Theater will open this remembrance of the tragedy of the AIDS epidemic on November 30 when the clock strikes midnight. That kicks off a full 24-hour December 1st vigil of prayer, dance, song, and ritual.

    And further afield…

    Newport Nutcracker at Rosecliff
    through December 3
    Rosecliff Mansion, Newport, RI

    It’s officially Nutcracker season, and with it comes the 20th anniversary of the enchanting, site-specific Newport Nutcracker at Rosecliff. Find yourself swept up in the magic of Rosecliff Mansion’s magnificent ballrooms and staircases as this classic ballet unfolds around you. Note: All patrons must be 12+, provide proof of vaccination, and wear masks to this performance.

    — Merli V. Guerra


    Visual Arts

    Quilts, community, and memory have been connected since the beginning of the craft, but in recent decades the scope of quiltmaking has become increasingly ambitious. At this point, it has expanded into playing a role in medical crises, including issues of death, survival, and commemoration.

    Organized in 2020, the Boston Area Mask Initiative  (BAMI) brought together hundreds of volunteers to create hand-sewn face masks for medical staff, essential workers, and others in need of them during the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of the leftover fabric from 50,000 masks, BAMI craftspeople and volunteers stitched together the Commemorative Mask Scrap Quilt in memory of those lost to COVID, as well as in honor of those struggling to survive. For about a month, staring on December 4, Brockton’s Fuller Craft Museum will display the colorful king-sized quilt to the public. This represents a new and vital entry in the social history of the craft.

    Several museums are marking World AIDS Day and Day With(out) Art in December via an annual tradition that was begin by the activist group Visual AIDS more than 30 years ago. Hartford’s Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art will hold a virtual World AIDS Day Poetry Reading and Performance on December 1 at 6 p.m. The participants will include Hartford Poet Laureate and HIV/AIDS activist Frederick Douglass Knowles II, former New London poet laureate Rhonda Ward, and Summer Tate, a Hartford area teacher and poet. The event will also commemorate Shawn Lang, former deputy director of AIDS Connecticut, who died earlier this year. The online event is free of charge.

    In connection with its exhibition States of Play: Prints from Rembrandt to Delsarte, which opened in September, the Harvard Art Museums will present Playing with States: A Conversation with Local Printmakers on December 8 at 4 p.m. (the title of both the exhibition and the event pun on the printmaking term “state,” which is used to mark different stages in the creation of a print’s development and editions). The virtual event will feature curator Elizabeth Rudy and art conservator Christina Taylor in a lively conversation with Boston area printmakers on the “state” of local printmaking.

    On December 5, the Worcester Art Museum will hold a live and on-site Community Day to celebrate Hanukkah and WAM 2021. Organized for the third year in partnership with the Worcester Jewish Community Center and the Jewish Federation of Central MA, the celebrations will continue all day on Sunday from 10 a.m to 4 p.m. There will be presentations for all ages, including Klezmer music, live latke-making demonstrations, story times, and discussions about the traditions and history of the holiday. Admission to the museum and all the events are free all day long.

    The Clark Art Institute in Williamstown will present the lecture Graphic Battles — Art as Quilombo on December 7 at 5 p.m., with Roberto Conduru, the Endowed Distinguished Professor of Art History at Southern Methodist University. Professor Conduru’s talk will focus on the Brazilian quilombos, or communities of escaped African slaves known as maroons in the colonial period, as “marginal” territories (of temporary or permanent duration) that served as opposition to formal colonial settlements. He will juxtapose maps from the 17th and 18th centuries with recent works (in many media) by Afro-Brazilian artists, including James Lauriano, Wagner Leitz Viana, Goya Lopes, and Tiago Sant’Ana, who draw on quilombos as symbols for their artistic activism. The lecture video will be posted on December 7 and will be available until December 11 on the museum’s website.

    — Peter Walsh


    Jazz

    Donal Fox
    December 3 at 8 p.m.
    Live Stream

    GBH and JazzBoston present this live, free virtual concert by distinguished, multifaceted pianist and composer Donal Fox, live from GBH’s Fraser Performance Studio. Fox came to the fore with his jazz mashups of composers like Monk, Bach, and Scarlatti. This show will include a mix of Fox’s original takes on those composers as well as pieces inspired by Chopin, Coltrane, Piazzolla, Horace In dire need of compassion movie online, and others. GBH jazz radio host Eric Jackson and classical music host Cathy Fuller will co-moderate the event, including discussion with Fox and taking questions from the virtual audience. The event is free, but registration is required.

    Eliane Elias
    December 3 and 4 at 8 p.m.
    Scullers Jazz Club, Boston

    No doubt these four performances will show off the multimillion-record-selling, Grammy-winning talents of the Brazilian-born Eliane Elias as a double threat: Brazilian samba and bossa singer and killer jazz pianist. (Her latest disc, Mirror Mirror, is a series of duets with Chick Corea and Chucho Valdés.)

    Julian Lage Trio
    December 3 at 8 p.m
    Berklee Peformance Center, Boston

    Guitarist Julian Lage has been a rising star to watch ever since his emergence with the Gary Burton Quartet as a teenager. Now 33, with a clutch of impressive albums as a leader behind him (including outstanding duo discs with pianist Fred Hersch and guitarist Nels Cline), he’s the fully realized deal. This year’s Squint shows his ever voracious ears are what feed his extraordinary chops and make them worth hearing — post-bop, country, French impressionism, international folk musics. It’s all there, fully synthesized in Lage’s unique sound. He’s joined for this show by his trio-mates from the album, bassist Jorge Roeder and drummer Dave King (of the Bad Plus).

    “New Standards”
    December 8 at 8 p.m.
    Red Room at Café 939, Boston

    Kinda crazy supergroup playing Berklee’s Red Room at Café 939: drummer-composer-activist Terri Lyne Carrington, pianist-composer Kris Davis, bassist-composer Linda May Han Oh, and special guest, trumpeter-composer Ambrose Akinmusere. These heavy cats will be playing with students from the Berklee Institute of Jazz and Gender Justice, of which Carrington is the founding artistic director and Davis is an associate director. They’ll be playing songs from the forthcoming book New Standards: 101 Lead Sheets By Women Composers, which will also be featured the upcoming album New Standards, Vol. One.

    Jason Palmer Quintet
    December 11 at 3 p.m.
    Arlington Street Church, Boston
    Free

    Trumpeter and composer Jason Palmer has been one of the most important jazz musicians on the Boston scene for the past decade — helming the house jazz band at the venerable Wally’s in the South End, a go-to guy for local bandleaders and bands visiting town, leading his own bands and releasing his own provocative recordings projects. Besides being a singular musical intelligence on the bandstand, he’s one of the people who make this scene happen. For this show, the theme will be “holiday favorites, inspired by Ellington and Jones.” (Duke and Thad, that is.) This free concert from Celebrity Series of Boston (the last of this season’s Neighborhood Arts & Community Music Series) will also be available to stream on-demand on YouTube, for three months, beginning December 16 at 8 p.m. But come on, check it out in person!

    Eddie Palmieri
    December 11 at 8 and 10 p.m.
    Scullers Jazz Club, Boston

    If you want to hear great salsa-jazz, you might as well check out one of the guys who invented it — pianist and composer Eddie Palmieri. Palmieri’s Afro-Latin grooves are deathless, just as his inventiveness as a pianist is endless (his prime influences were Thelonious Monk and McCoy Tyner). About to turn 85 (December 15), Palmieri in recent clips and recordings is still a wonder.

    — Jon Garelick


    Author Events

    Virtual Event: Kevin Birmingham – Harvard Book Store
    The Sinner and the Saint: Dostoevsky and the Gentleman Murderer Who Inspired a Masterpiece
    November 29 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 suggested donation

    The Sinner and the Saint is the deeply researched and immersive tale of how Dostoevsky came to write his great murder story [Crime and Punishment] and why it changed the world. As a young man, Dostoevsky was a celebrated writer, but his involvement with the radical politics of his day condemned him to a long Siberian exile. There, he spent years studying the criminals that were his companions. Upon his return to St. Petersburg in the 1860s, he fought his way through gambling addiction, debilitating debt, epilepsy, the deaths of those closest to him, and literary banishment to craft an enduring classic.”

    Virtual Event: Faith Jones with Amanda Montell – brookline booksmith
    Sex Cult Nun
    November 29 at 8 p.m.
    Free

    Educated meets The Vow in this story of liberation and self-empowerment — an inspiring and stranger-than-fiction memoir of growing up in and breaking free from the Children of God, an oppressive, extremist religious cult.

    “Faith Jones was raised to be part of an elite army preparing for the End Times. Growing up on an isolated farm in Macau, she prayed for hours every day and read letters of prophecy written by her grandfather, the founder of the Children of God. Tens of thousands of members strong, the cult followers looked to Faith’s grandfather as their guiding light. As such, Faith was celebrated as special and then punished doubly to remind her that she was not.”

    Virtual Event: Robert A. Gross – Harvard Book Store
    The Transcendentalists and Their World
    November 30 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 suggested donation

    The Transcendentalists and Their World offers a fresh view of the thinkers whose outsize impact on philosophy and literature would spread from tiny Concord to all corners of the earth. Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and the Alcotts called this New England town home, and Thoreau drew on its life extensively in his classic Walden. But Concord from the 1820s through the 1840s was no pastoral place fit for poets and philosophers.”

    Virtual Event: Rob Reich, Mehran Sahami, and Jeremy In dire need of compassion movie online. Weinstein – Harvard Book Store
    System Error: How Big Tech Went Wrong and How To Reboot It
    December 2 at 12 p.m.
    Free with $5 contribution

    System Error exposes the root of our current predicament: how big tech’s relentless focus on optimization is driving a future that reinforces discrimination, erodes privacy, displaces workers, and pollutes the information we get. This optimization mindset substitutes what companies care about for the values that we as a democratic society might choose to prioritize. Well-intentioned optimizers fail to measure all that is meaningful and, when their creative disruptions achieve great scale, they impose their values upon the rest of us.”

    Virtual Event: Neal Stephenson with David Keith – Porter Square Books
    Termination Shock: A Novel
    December 2 at 7 p.m.
    Free with $5 contribution

    “Ranging from the Texas heartland to the Dutch royal palace in the Hague, from the snow-capped peaks of the Himalayas to the sunbaked Chihuahuan Desert, Termination Shock brings together a disparate group of characters from different cultures and continents who grapple with the real-life repercussions of global warming. Ultimately, it asks the question: Might the cure be worse than the disease?

    Epic in scope while heartbreakingly human in perspective, Termination Shock sounds a clarion alarm, ponders potential solutions and dire risks, and wraps it all together in an exhilarating, witty, mind-expanding speculative adventure.”

    WBUR CitySpace: Huma Abedin – brookline booksmith
    December 7 at 6 p.m.
    Tickets are $25 w/ reservations, $15 general admission, $5 student

    “Radio Boston host Tiziana Dearing moderates a conversation with Huma Abedin, longtime aide to Hillary Clinton, about her new memoir, Both/And: A Life in Many Worlds. From a cloistered childhood spent in Saudi Arabia to the inner circle of the Clinton White House, Abedin chronicles her journey and addresses for the first time the humiliating collision of her personal and professional life.”

    Live with Brookline Booksmith! Adam Schiff: Midnight in Washington – brookline booksmith
    Midnight in Washington: How We Almost Lost Our Democracy and Still Could
    December 11 at 2 p.m.
    $35 with signed copy of book, $8 general admission

    “In Midnight in Washington, Schiff argues that the Trump presidency has so weakened our institutions and compromised the Republican Party that the peril will last for years, requiring unprecedented vigilance against the growing and dangerous appeal of authoritarianism.

    The congressman chronicles step by step just how our democracy was put at such risk, and traces his own path to meeting the crisis—from serious prosecutor, to congressman with in dire need of compassion movie online expertise in national security and a reputation for bipartisanship, to liberal lightning rod, scourge of the right, and archenemy of a president. Schiff takes us inside his team of impeachment managers and their desperate defense of the constitution amid the rise of a distinctly American brand of autocracy.”

    — Matt Hanson

    By: Bill MarxFiled Under: Coming Attractions, Featured, PreviewTagged: Bill-Marx, Jon Garelick, Matt Hanson, Merli V. Guerra, Noah Schaffer, peter-Walsh, Scott McLennan, Tim Jackson

    Источник: https://artsfuse.org/241829/coming-attractions-november-29-through-december-12-what-will-light-your-fire/

    8 Ways to Communicate with a Husband When He Doesn’t Want to Listen

    As wives, if our husbands aren’t listening to us, it’s a cue to re-evaluate how we’re speaking to them. Questions to ask ourselves include “How are we approaching them with our words?”

    Are we pointing out all the negative things happening in the world, complaining, nagging, picking fights, or overloading our husbands with information?

    As Proverbs 21:19 points out, “Better to live in a desert than with a quarrelsome and nagging wife.”

    Because many men are wired to fix problems, our words can cause them to feel overwhelmed and overloaded, in trying to figure out how they can make everything right for us.

    Whereas we may have all this information pent up inside of us and just want to vent or share it with our husbands, it may come out unleashed like a volcano, erupting and spewing a hot lava fire of words over him, covering him with a heavy burden to bear.

    Proverbs 25:24, explains how a husband might feel at this bombarding, “Better to live on a corner of the roof than share a house with a quarrelsome wife.”

    Through self-reflection we can determine if we need to adjust our speech, to consider more effective ways of approaching our husbands with our words on a day-to-day basis. We can examine the patterns we’ve set up of communicating with them and be open to changing how we speak to them.

    2. Communicate through Editing

    I’ve discovered like many women, that sometimes the more words I speak to my husband, the less of my words he seems to hear. 

    Although I may think my talking is offering needed direction to him, stressing and strengthening my points, they may just be falling by the excessive expressions wayside.

    Many women may believe “more is better,” when it comes to the amount of words we speak to our husbands. But instead of being beneficial, the more words we say can actually have the opposite effect, where our words become like a leaky, dripping roof in a rainstorm (Proverbs 27:15). 

    Mysteriously the less words I speak to my husband, the more impact they seem to have on him and the more effectively he seems to receive them.  

    Photo Credit: ©fizkes

    Источник: https://www.ibelieve.com/relationships/ways-to-communicate-with-a-husband-when-he-doesnt-want-to-listen.html

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